#113 - Always Keep It 100

October 27, 2021

Get exposed to the American accent from New Orleans, Louisiana, and learn what it means to keep it 100.

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[00:00:00] What's up, everybody? You're listening to another episode of Life in English. I'm your host Tony Kaizen. And this episode is a reminder to always keep it a hundred.

[00:00:15] All right, y'all in this episode, we are going to take a trip down South to New Orleans, Louisiana. I found another interesting clip that will not only expose you to more real American English, but also send you a valuable message. 

[00:00:27] So first, I'll play the clip from start to finish and next I'll walk you through the clip line by line to make sure you understand everything that is being said. And don't feel if you don't understand the clip, the first time you hear it, the New Orleans accent is very particular and it's hard to understand if you're not familiar with it. But let's not waste any more time, let's get into this episode. 

[00:00:51] See, you could be a hundred to people every day, all day. You heard me? And they could be fifty to you every day, all day. And it's all good. But once you catch on to them being a fifty and you always being a hundred, and you start moving differently, guess what they do. They get mad at you. 'Cause you done caught on to they fake bullshit they bringing to the table, and they doing, and what they want to do. They want to play victim and act like you doing them some bad.

[00:01:22] When the whole time you been a hundred and they been fifty. But guess what? Fuck them people, man. Fuck them. Real talk. At the end of the day, fuck them people. You heard me? In the middle of the night, fuck them people. 

[00:01:36] Move around them people. Let them be fifty with the fifty people they want to be fifty with. You keep being a hundred. Don't let them fifties stop you from being a hundred. You always keep it a thousand. You heard me? No matter what. Just lay there and clear your catalog, close your circle

[00:01:51] All right, y'all, like I said before, don't feel bad if you couldn't understand the entire clip or even the majority of it. I'm sure there are even some people in the U.S. that would have a hard time understanding this accent and dialect.

[00:02:04] So first, let me explain what it means when we say 'keep it a hundred'. To keep it a hundred simply means to stay true to yourself. In other words, it means to be yourself and live by your values, no matter what someone else says or thinks about it. 

[00:02:17] So, 'keep it' means to maintain it the way it is or to maintain it in your possession.

[00:02:24] Now, the idea of a hundred is that the number 100 represents completeness or fullness. Like when you get a hundred percent on your English exam or you feel a hundred percent healthy, right? So if you're keeping it in a hundred, you're being a hundred percent, your authentic self. Right? Now, to keep it a hundred can also mean to be honest, which is more or less the same thing, depending on how you look at it.

[00:02:47] For example, I might say, “I'ma keep it a hundred with you.” And just in case you couldn't understand that, another way or... yeah, another way of saying that is, “I'm going to keep it one hundred with you.” But naturally I would say. “I'ma keep it a hundred with you.” Which is the same thing as saying, “I'm going to be completely honest with you.” 

[00:03:07] I'm gonna keep it a hundred with you, bro. Like, I'm gonna be honest with you. You see what I'm saying? 

[00:03:11] Now, there are a few variations of this phrase as well, so we can say keep it a hundred or keep it a thousand, keep it a band, keep it a stack, keep it all the way tall or simply keep it real. Like I said, these all mean the same thing.

[00:03:26] So when you think of a thousand, it's a hundred times ten. So it's just kind of, like, emphasis on the phrase. You're saying all the way real, one hundred and fifty percent, a thousand percent real and authentic. 

[00:03:38] Now, the word 'band', in this case, is slang for a thousand. And the same thing with the word 'stack'. A stack is $1,000. So to keep it a band or keep it a stack needs to keep it a thousand, which means to keep it a hundred. You see what I'm saying? 

[00:03:52] And to keep it all the way tall is similar to the phrase straight up, which just means honest or direct or a hundred percent real. Now, I don't want to start to confuse you. So we'll stay focused on this phrase for now. And just remember that at the end of the day, they all mean the same thing. Keep it real, keep it a band, keep it all the way tall, keep it a hundred. It's all the same. 

[00:04:14] So now you should understand the meaning of the phrase, keep it a hundred. So let's listen to the clip again, so you can understand everything that was said and the true message of this man's words. So let's do it. 

[00:04:27] See, you can be a hundred to people every day, all day, you heard me?

[00:04:35] Alright. See, you can be a hundred to people every day, all day. You heard me. So there's a couple of things I want to explain in this line. The first one, the pronunciation of the words, a hundred. 

[00:04:47] It's very common here in the U.S., depending on where you're from and what your culture is, we don't pronounce the words a hundred. It's much faster and easier, um, to say, 'uh hunnid'. 'Uh hunnid'. You can be a hundred with people, or you can be one hundred or a hundred. It's the same thing, just a difference of pronunciation. 

[00:05:05] So then he said, “You heard me?” at the end of the sentence. You heard me? And this is a phrase that's very particular to New Orleans. I don't know if they say in other parts of Louisiana or in other states near Louisiana, but I know for sure in New Orleans they say, “You heard me?”

[00:05:22] Which is the words 'you heard me'. Right? And technically the grammatically correct way to ask, 'cause it is a question, so the grammatically correct way to say that is, “Did you hear me?” Right? But a more, let's say, informal way of asking the question is, “You heard me?” Right? 

[00:05:40] And that's the same thing as saying, you feel me, you dig what I'm saying. Do you understand what I'm saying? Can you identify? Are you following? You heard me?. It's very particular to New Orleans, maybe Louisiana, but I'm not sure, but definitely New Orleans. And you're going to hear that a lot in this clip, but also, probably when you're talking to some people from New Orleans or listening to music from there. All right. So let's move on to the next line

[00:06:05] And they can be fifty to you everyday, all day. And it's all good. And they can be fifty to you every day, all day. And it's all good. So there's two things I want to explain here. The first one is the pronunciation of the word, fifty F I F T Y. The number, let's say, and he didn't say fifty, he said fitty... fitty. Now, again, depending on where you're from, you might say fifty, or you might say fifty, fifty is faster and easier. Um, So it's really your choice. I'm just trying to get you to understand what he actually said. And it's just a difference of pronunciation. Some people say fifty, some people say fifty, so there you go. 

[00:06:49] And at the end of that sentence, he said, it's all good, which is three words. It's all good. But he kind of blended those words together. Using connected speech and said is'sall'good. It's all good. You see? And when we say it's all good, it just means everything is fine. There's no problems. So you can be a hundred with people, you can be real, you can be authentic and somebody else can still be fake with you. And for them it's no problem. It's all good. Right? All right. Hopefully, that makes sense. So let's move on to the next line. 

[00:07:23] And it's all good. But once you catch on to them being a fifty and you always being a hundred and you start moving differently, guess what they do. They get mad at you. 

[00:07:36] All right. There's a lot I need to explain in that idea right there. He said, but once you catch on to them being fifty. So the first thing is catch on. The phrasal verb catch on basically means to start to understand something. And we typically use catch on in a case where it takes you some time to start to understand what's going on or what's happening. You see what I'm saying?

[00:07:58] So these people can be fifty percent real and authentic with you. They can be fake with you, and it might take you some time to start to understand or really see what's happening, you know? So once you catch on to them, being a fifty and you always being 100, and you start moving differently, which is the next thing I want to explain.

[00:08:17] He says, moving differently. He doesn't mean, like, physically moving. When we say moving in this case, when you start moving differently, he means start behaving differently. You start acting differently, right? We're talking about how you move through the world or through life. It's more figurative. So your behavior, your decisions, your actions, your words, and all that, all of that is included in the way you move. The way you behave, you see? 

[00:08:40] So you start moving differently, you start acting or behaving differently, and guess what they do, they get mad at you. And that's the last thing I want to explain here. 'Cause he said they get mad at you. So you might notice, it sounds a little different. It's not at you because the word ‘at’ ends with the letter T and the word ‘you’ starts with the letter Y. So in almost every case where that happens, a lot of Americans will say 'tchu'. The, the word that ends with a T that's followed by a word that starts with a Y makes a 'tcha' sound. So instead of saying at you, we connect them and say at you, they get mad at you. Okay? 

[00:09:17] So one more time, the whole idea. Once you start to understand and become aware of the fake shit that's going on and you start to move differently or behave differently, guess what happens? They get mad at you. Okay. Hopefully that makes sense. And we gon' move on to the next line.

[00:09:37] Guess what they do. They get mad at you 'cause you done caught on to they fake bullshit they bringing to the table and they doing and what they wanna do. 

[00:09:47] All right. A lot of stuff to explain here, my friend. So here we go. He says, 'cause you done caught on to they fake bullshit. So the first thing you probably know, but just in case you don't, he said, because you done caught on and 'cause, in this case... A lot of Americans will say, 'cause instead of because. The complete word is because, but we kind of shorten it and just say, 'cause, all right? 

[00:10:08] So the next thing is you done caught on. So here he is, he's using the present perfect. But according to the grammar rules, it's grammatically incorrect. 'Cause he should say you have caught on, but a lot of places in the U.S. depending on your culture, the region and things like that, a lot of people would say you done caught on.

[00:10:27] Anytime they're using the present perfect, instead of saying 'have' and then the verb, they say 'done' and then the verb. You done caught on, or you done seen, or you done gone where you done been, instead of you have been, you have caught on, you have seen, you have done. Why? I don't know, but just understand technically it's grammatically incorrect, but you will hear it, you know, depending on the region or the person you're talking to in the U.S. All right? 

[00:10:53] So you should know what caught on means at this point. So you done caught on, or you have caught on to they fake bullshit. Another case where he said they, but technically he should have said their fake bullshit, because we're talking about the bullshit that belongs to them. It's theirs. It's not they, it's their bullshit. You see what I'm saying? But again, depending on where you are, a lot of people speak this way. Instead of saying their they say, they, I don't know why, but they do. So instead of saying, like, they're bullshit or their kids or their money, they would say they bullshit, they kids, they money. But what they mean to say is their, technically. All right? 

[00:11:32] And fake bullshit. You should know what fake means. It's just the opposite of real, the opposite of authentic. And bullshit, in this case, it's kind of like nonsense. They fake nonsense. Ridiculousness, you know, that's the basic idea. So you have caught on to their fake bullshit that they bringing to the table. Another case where he said they, and he should have said they're, or they are because we're using the present continuous here. The fake bullshit that they are bringing to the table, but he said the fake shit that they bringing to the table. It's just faster to say it that way. And again, it's incorrect grammatically, but a lot of people speak that way. All right? 

[00:12:12] So bring to the table, the fake shit that they are bringing to the table. To bring something to the table means to contribute something. So if somebody asks you, “What do you bring to the table?” They're saying, what do you have to contribute? What are you contributing to this situation or relationship or whatever it is. So you have caught on to they fake bullshit that they bringing to the table or bringing to the relationship. You see what I'm saying? 

[00:12:38] And they doing and what they want to do. That's the last thing he said. And that they doing and they want to do, and this was kind of redundant. So it's hard to explain that entire thing. So let me play it one more time and I'll try to explain the last part of that idea.

[00:12:56] Because you done caught on to they fake bullshit they bringing to the table and they doing, and what they want to do. 

[00:13:02] So he said that they bringing to the table, and they doing, and what they want to do. Just kind of being redundant at this point. 'Cause he's saying the fake shit that they are bringing to the table. And then he continues to say that they doing and that they want to do. And he's still talking about the fake bullshit. So the fake bullshit, that one, they are bringing to the table, two, that they are doing, and three, that they want to do. Hopefully, that makes sense. 

[00:13:27] And the last thing I want to explain is he said that they doing another case where he should say they are doing, but he said they doing, I guess it's just faster and easier. 

[00:13:36] And that they want to do... that. Oh, no, he said, “What they want to do.” “And what they want to do.” So the last thing I want to bring to your attention here is instead of saying what they want to do, he used connect to speech and said, “they wanna do.” “And what they wanna do.” Okay? Hopefully, I'm not confusing you. Hopefully, you're still with me.

[00:13:58] It's kind of difficult to explain these things because some of it is cultural, not, it's not just about the language. You know, the reason that we say certain things, even though it's grammatically incorrect, and which people say it this way, it's kind of difficult to explain it. But hopefully, you still with me, I think we're about halfway through the clip, so let's continue.

[00:14:19] And what they want to do. They wanna play victim, and act like you doing them something bad. When the whole time... 

[00:14:25] All right. So the next line, they want to play victim and act like you doing them something bad. Again, a lot to explain. So, he said, “They want to play victim.” Again, it's want to, and you just connect the words and say, wanna. 

[00:14:41] The next thing is play victim. Now, the complete phrase is play the victim, but you can say play victim and it's the same exact thing. And what that means... he's not saying play like have fun or like it's a game or anything like that. He's saying act like the victim. To play someone or something in this context... In this context, to play the victim, to play the hero, to play the boss, to play the employee, whatever, it means to act like this thing. So if you want to play victim, it means you want to act like the victim. You see? 

[00:15:13] So, so they want to play victim and act like you doing them something bad. So again, another case where we're using the present continuous, but he's not using the word 'are' in this case. He just said you doing them something bad. When technically, you should say, 'you are doing' or 'you're doing'. You see? 

[00:15:32] And then he says, 'doing them something bad'. This one is a little hard to explain... doing them something bad. Because it's like a colloquial phrase that we have. If you do somebody some kind of way, it means to treat somebody some kind of way. So if you do somebody wrong, if you do her wrong or do him wrong or do me wrong, it means that you treat me wrong or incorrectly. You do something wrong to me, it's just a colloquial way of speaking. 

[00:15:59] So he's saying you're doing them something bad. Probably sounds a little strange, the sentence structure, but it's very normal to us. You're doing them something bad, which is the same thing as saying you're doing something bad to them. Okay. So I wouldn't recommend that you write this way if you're trying to pass a test or the IELTS or some type of English exam, but you will hear people speak that way in the U.S. All right? Cool. Let's move on to the next line.

[00:16:30] Something bad. When the whole time you've been a hundred and they been fifty. But guess what? Fuck them people, man. Fuck them. Real talk. At end of the day, fuck them people. 

[00:16:43] All right. Actually played too much. Let me go... I played two lines instead of one, but anyway, I'll still explain. When the whole time, you've been a hundred, and they been fifty. So the first thing I want to bring to your attention is he says, 'when the whole time', but he didn't pronounce it like that. He connected the words 'when' and 'the', and he said 'whena'. When the whole time, when the whole time you've been a hundred. 'When-a-whole time', instead of when the whole time. You see? So you don't have to speak this way to sound natural. I just want you to understand every single thing that's being said and the little details and the patterns of speech and pronunciation in some people here in the U.S. All right?

[00:17:28] So when the whole time you've been a hundred and they been fifty. So, another grammar observation. He says, 'you been a hundred'. When technically, you should say 'you have been a hundred' or 'you've been a hundred'. But he omitted the verb 'have' in this case and just said, 'you been'. Okay? It's grammatically incorrect, but very common.

[00:17:50] All right. And then he said they been fifty. So you've been hundred and they been fifty. The same thing. You should say, ' they have been' fifty. But he just omits that verb from his phrase. Probably because it's faster and easier, but like I said, it's grammatically incorrect, just so you know. 

[00:18:06] Then he says, “But guess what? Fuck them people, man. Fuck them people.” Now, the way he pronounced the word, isn't the typical pronunciation. I think he was just putting, you know, emphasis on it. Maybe not to be funny, but he was just putting emphasis on it, just so you know. So let me play it one more time so you can hear it. 

[00:18:26] And they've been fifty. But guess what? Fuck them people, man. Fuck them. Real talk. 

[00:18:33] All right. Fuck them people. So I already talked about the pronunciation of fuck, but then he says, fuck them people when he should say, fuck those people. Okay? But it's just another colloquial thing, instead of saying, you know, 'them', or, excuse me, instead of saying 'those' people, we'll say 'them'. 

[00:18:53] 'I don't like them people', or 'I don't want them things', or some, 'I don't know them people', or something like that when you should be saying those, the grammatically correct thing to say is 'those'. Okay? He said, “fuck them people.”

[00:19:06] Um, and then the next thing I want to bring to your attention is fuck them. Fuck them. Just the way he pronounced it. He didn't say, fuck them. He said, “fuck'em.” “Fuck'em.” So he completely removed the TH from the word 'them' and said “fuck'em.” It's very, very common, a very connected way of saying the words. Fuck'em! Very, very common. All right. Just so you can understand what he said. 

[00:19:31] And then the last thing he said in that phrase was 'real talk'. Real talk is a phrase that just means like, um, this is, what I'm saying is true. What I'm saying is authentic. What I'm saying is real. Real talk. So if somebody says something that you think is absolutely true and you agree with, and you want to kind of emphasize the fact that you do agree and you think it's true and a hundred percent authentic, you can say, “real talk.” You know, I agree. That's real what you just said. That's true. That's authentic. You know? 

[00:19:59] But you can also say it when you're talking, like, “This is my point A, B and C, real talk.” Which is like saying, “This is my point A, B and C, I mean, what I say, you know, this is a hundred percent true and authentic what I'm saying. It's real talk.” You know, what I'm saying is real. That's the idea. All right, let's move on to the next line. 

[00:20:21] ...people, man. Fuck them. Real talk. At end of the day, fuck them people. You heard me? 

[00:20:28] At the end of the day, fuck them people. You heard me? So, at the end of the day is a phrase that just means when all things are taken into consideration. All right. So it's a, an expression let's say. So when everything's taken into consideration, after everything is said and done, which is another way of saying it, fuck them people or those people. Same thing. It's just one is grammatically correct, the other one is not. 

[00:20:54] But at the end of the day, fuck them people, you heard me? So there's that phrase again. That New Orleans phrase 'you heard me?' Maybe Louisiana... I'm not sure, like I said. But let's move on to the next line 'cause it's connected to this line. So let's play them both.

[00:21:09] Fuck them people, you heard me? In the middle of the night, fuck them people. 

[00:21:15] All right. In the middle of the night, fuck them people. Now this isn't something that we say all the time. It's just, it's just a creative way of using the language because the actual expression is 'at the end of the day'. That's normal, everybody uses that and understands that, but then he says, and at, “in the middle of the night.” So he's kind of taking the literal meaning of 'at the end of the day', and then he's playing with the language and saying also in the middle of the night. 

[00:21:40] So 'at the end of the day' just means when everything's taken into consideration, but the literal meaning 'at the end of the day', we're talking about the time of day. You have morning, afternoon, and evening... At the end of the day. So the next line, he's playing with the literal meaning and saying also in the middle of the night, which basically means... he's trying to say all the time, not just in the morning, not just at the end of the day, but also in the middle of the night, fuck them people. Fuck them in the morning. Fuck them in the afternoon. Fuck them in the evening. Fuck them at night. Fuck them a midnight. Fuck them people, all the time. You know? So hopefully you can understand, he's just playing with the language, putting emphasis on the fact that you need to say, “Fuck them people.” Every day, all day. That's the idea. Hopefully, it makes sense. All right, so let's move on to the next line. 

[00:22:28] You heard me? In the middle of the night, fuck them people. Move around them people. Let them be fifty with the fifty people they wanna be fifty with. 

[00:22:38] All right. Like I said, do not feel bad if this is hard to follow, I'm going to explain it for you. Hopefully you'll understand. All right. Move around them people. To move around, in this case, is literal and figurative 'cause to move around basically means to pass to the other side of. Right? So let's imagine these people are in front of you. You pass to the other side of them and you keep moving. You don't let them stop you. You don't let them be an obstacle. Just step to the side and keep moving forward, move around them. All right? 

[00:23:06] Move around them people. Again, you should say 'those' people, but especially if you're watching this on YouTube, you can see the words that I've highlighted in different colors. You can see the patterns of grammar in his speech. You can see the patterns of pronunciation in his speech. All right. So move around 'them' people should be move around 'those' people, technically. All right. 

[00:23:26] Then he says, let them be fifty with the fifty people they wanna be fifty with. Goddamn. So again, the word 'fifty' he's pronouncing 'fitty'. And he says it multiple times, “Let them be fifty with the fifty people they wanna be fifty with.” Okay. 

[00:23:43] He also said 'with the', let them be fifty with the fifty people. But he didn't say 'with the'. He said, “wit'the.” He connected those two words. Let them be fifty with the fifty... with the. Let them be fifty with the fifty people they want to be fifty with. So again, he connected want and to and said 'wanna be fifty with'. So let me say it one more time. Let them be fifty with the fifty people they want to be fifty with. Let them be fake with the fake people they want to be fake with. Okay. 

[00:24:18] Again, don't feel bad if this is kind of hard to follow or understand. You know, it's, it's a colloquial way of speaking, man. So if you can't understand it, don't feel bad. 'Cause this is the type of stuff that they don't really teach in school, they don't expose you to. So this is your first time hearing somebody speak like this is going to be difficult. So don't feel bad if you're still following me at this point, congrats to you because it is difficult, man, but I'm trying to help you understand the way people actually talk here in the United States. There's many different ways to speak English and this is one of them. All right? So let's continue.

[00:24:51] Move around them people. Let them be fifty with the fifty people they wanna be fifty with. You keep being a hundred. Don't let them fifties stop you from being a hundred. 

[00:24:59] All right. So you keep being a hundred. Which.. You should know what that means now. You keep being authentic. You keep.. keeping it a hundred. You keep being real. 

[00:25:09] And the next thing you said is “Don't let them fifties stop you from being hundred.” Another case where he should say, don't let 'those' fifties or fake people keep you or stop you from being a hundred. So don't.. You keep being real. Don't let those fake people stop you from being real. That's the idea here. All right. Next line. 

[00:25:34] Don't let them fifties stop you from being a hundred. You always keep it a thousand. You heard me? No matter what. Just lay there and clear your catalog, close your circle. 

[00:25:44] All right. I played two lines only meant to play one. So let me go back to the first one. 

[00:25:49] Stop you from being a hundred. You always keep it a thousand. You heard me? No matter what. 

[00:25:54] All right, you always keep it at a thousand. So he's just continuing his idea. Don't let the fifties stop you from being a hundred. You always keep it a thousand. And again, when you say keep it a thousand, you're just putting emphasis on the idea of keeping it a hundred. All the way real, all the way authentic. You always keep it a thousand. Always keep it real. You heard me? Right? 

[00:26:14] And then he says, “No matter what.” So when we use the phrase, 'no matter what', it's like saying, 'not under any circumstances, not in any case or situation'. So you always keep it real and you never be fake. You never let somebody else stop you from being real, under any circumstances. No matter what happens. It doesn't matter what happens, regardless of what happens, independent of what happens. You see what I'm saying? That's the idea of when we say 'no matter what', not under any circumstances. Okay? Last line. 

[00:26:44] Just lay there and clear your catalog, close your circle. 

[00:26:49] Just lay there and clear your catalog, close your circle. So the first thing, he used the word, 'just'. In this case, when we use the word 'just', in this context, it means 'simply'. Simply lay there and clear your catalog. 

[00:27:03] So the next thing you says is 'lay there'. And this is a colloquial way of speaking. And when we say 'lay there', we don't mean physically lay down. We just mean sit there or stay in your current position. And that's really what it means. So just sit there, stay in your current position and clear your catalog. 

[00:27:20] So when he says 'clear your catalog', it's a figure of speech. It's like... He's saying.. Let's imagine you have a list of friends in a catalog. Friend, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7. To clear your catalog means to remove everything from the catalog, to clear it, to take it back to zero, to make it so that there's nothing in the catalog. You see? So when he says clear your catalog, he's talking about your list of friends. Lay there, simply sit there and remove all those fake people from your list of friends. That's the idea. 

[00:27:52] And he emphasizes that when he says, “Close your circle.” Because a lot of times, at least in English, we talk about your group of friends or colleagues or associates as 'your circle', your social circle. So when he says 'close your circle', that means it's not open anymore. People don't have access to the circle because you closed it.

[00:28:10] So take or remove everybody, all the fake people from your social circle and close the circle. Don't let anything fake or inauthentic into your circle. Clear your catalog, close your circle. You always keep it a hundred. You always keep it real. Don't let the fake, you know, stop you from being real. That's the idea.

[00:28:33] All right. My friend now, hopefully, hopefully, you should understand every single word that was said in the clip. So let's go back and listen to the entire thing. One more time from start to finish and see if you can get the true message of what's being said here without any help. All right? Let's do it. 

[00:28:51] See, you can be a hundred to people every day, all day, you heard me? And they can be fifty to you every day, all day. And it's all good. But once you catch on to them being a fifty and you always being a hundred, and you start moving differently, guess what they do... They get mad at you. ‘Cause you done caught on to they fake bullshit they bringing to the table, and they doing, and what they want to do. They want to play victim and act like you're doing them something bad. When the whole time, you been a hundred and they been fifty. But guess what? Fuck them people, man. Fuck them. Real talk. At end of the day, fuck them people. You heard me? In the middle of the night, fuck them people. Move around on people. Let them be fifty with the fifty people they want to be fifty with. You keep being a hundred. Don't let them fifties stop you from being a hundred. You always keep a thousand. You heard me? No matter what. Just lay there and clear your catalog, close your circle. 

[00:29:52] All right, my friend. So just in case you still couldn't understand.. Hopefully, you could, but just in case, the main idea of this clip is from time to time, you will find yourself in situations with people who don't appreciate your authenticity or your good nature.

[00:30:06] You might do everything you can to contribute to a relationship, romantic or platonic, by being generous and authentic, and your partner could still take it for granted. You might give them the best of you and still get the worst of them in return. At the end of the day, you have no control over that. You can be a hundred percent authentic and honest with someone and they will still be fake with you. They'll still lie to you, deceive you, and treat you like an invaluable option.

[00:30:35] The resolution to this type of situation isn't to get mad and call them out on it. And you definitely shouldn't start being fake with them because when you do things like that, they will most likely get defensive and try to turn the tables. They'll try to play the victim and make it seem like you're the one that's tripping. You're the one that's being fake now. You see what I'm saying? 

[00:30:55] You simply need to say, “Fuck them.” Respectfully. Don't let someone else's fake behavior influence you and change your authentic behavior. Just remove the fake, deceitful, and unappreciative people from your life. Close your circle and continue to keep it a hundred. No matter what. Peace.

[END OF PODCAST]

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[00:00:00] What's up, everybody? You're listening to another episode of Life in English. I'm your host Tony Kaizen. And this episode is a reminder to always keep it a hundred.

[00:00:15] All right, y'all in this episode, we are going to take a trip down South to New Orleans, Louisiana. I found another interesting clip that will not only expose you to more real American English, but also send you a valuable message. 

[00:00:27] So first, I'll play the clip from start to finish and next I'll walk you through the clip line by line to make sure you understand everything that is being said. And don't feel if you don't understand the clip, the first time you hear it, the New Orleans accent is very particular and it's hard to understand if you're not familiar with it. But let's not waste any more time, let's get into this episode. 

[00:00:51] See, you could be a hundred to people every day, all day. You heard me? And they could be fifty to you every day, all day. And it's all good. But once you catch on to them being a fifty and you always being a hundred, and you start moving differently, guess what they do. They get mad at you. 'Cause you done caught on to they fake bullshit they bringing to the table, and they doing, and what they want to do. They want to play victim and act like you doing them some bad.

[00:01:22] When the whole time you been a hundred and they been fifty. But guess what? Fuck them people, man. Fuck them. Real talk. At the end of the day, fuck them people. You heard me? In the middle of the night, fuck them people. 

[00:01:36] Move around them people. Let them be fifty with the fifty people they want to be fifty with. You keep being a hundred. Don't let them fifties stop you from being a hundred. You always keep it a thousand. You heard me? No matter what. Just lay there and clear your catalog, close your circle

[00:01:51] All right, y'all, like I said before, don't feel bad if you couldn't understand the entire clip or even the majority of it. I'm sure there are even some people in the U.S. that would have a hard time understanding this accent and dialect.

[00:02:04] So first, let me explain what it means when we say 'keep it a hundred'. To keep it a hundred simply means to stay true to yourself. In other words, it means to be yourself and live by your values, no matter what someone else says or thinks about it. 

[00:02:17] So, 'keep it' means to maintain it the way it is or to maintain it in your possession.

[00:02:24] Now, the idea of a hundred is that the number 100 represents completeness or fullness. Like when you get a hundred percent on your English exam or you feel a hundred percent healthy, right? So if you're keeping it in a hundred, you're being a hundred percent, your authentic self. Right? Now, to keep it a hundred can also mean to be honest, which is more or less the same thing, depending on how you look at it.

[00:02:47] For example, I might say, “I'ma keep it a hundred with you.” And just in case you couldn't understand that, another way or... yeah, another way of saying that is, “I'm going to keep it one hundred with you.” But naturally I would say. “I'ma keep it a hundred with you.” Which is the same thing as saying, “I'm going to be completely honest with you.” 

[00:03:07] I'm gonna keep it a hundred with you, bro. Like, I'm gonna be honest with you. You see what I'm saying? 

[00:03:11] Now, there are a few variations of this phrase as well, so we can say keep it a hundred or keep it a thousand, keep it a band, keep it a stack, keep it all the way tall or simply keep it real. Like I said, these all mean the same thing.

[00:03:26] So when you think of a thousand, it's a hundred times ten. So it's just kind of, like, emphasis on the phrase. You're saying all the way real, one hundred and fifty percent, a thousand percent real and authentic. 

[00:03:38] Now, the word 'band', in this case, is slang for a thousand. And the same thing with the word 'stack'. A stack is $1,000. So to keep it a band or keep it a stack needs to keep it a thousand, which means to keep it a hundred. You see what I'm saying? 

[00:03:52] And to keep it all the way tall is similar to the phrase straight up, which just means honest or direct or a hundred percent real. Now, I don't want to start to confuse you. So we'll stay focused on this phrase for now. And just remember that at the end of the day, they all mean the same thing. Keep it real, keep it a band, keep it all the way tall, keep it a hundred. It's all the same. 

[00:04:14] So now you should understand the meaning of the phrase, keep it a hundred. So let's listen to the clip again, so you can understand everything that was said and the true message of this man's words. So let's do it. 

[00:04:27] See, you can be a hundred to people every day, all day, you heard me?

[00:04:35] Alright. See, you can be a hundred to people every day, all day. You heard me. So there's a couple of things I want to explain in this line. The first one, the pronunciation of the words, a hundred. 

[00:04:47] It's very common here in the U.S., depending on where you're from and what your culture is, we don't pronounce the words a hundred. It's much faster and easier, um, to say, 'uh hunnid'. 'Uh hunnid'. You can be a hundred with people, or you can be one hundred or a hundred. It's the same thing, just a difference of pronunciation. 

[00:05:05] So then he said, “You heard me?” at the end of the sentence. You heard me? And this is a phrase that's very particular to New Orleans. I don't know if they say in other parts of Louisiana or in other states near Louisiana, but I know for sure in New Orleans they say, “You heard me?”

[00:05:22] Which is the words 'you heard me'. Right? And technically the grammatically correct way to ask, 'cause it is a question, so the grammatically correct way to say that is, “Did you hear me?” Right? But a more, let's say, informal way of asking the question is, “You heard me?” Right? 

[00:05:40] And that's the same thing as saying, you feel me, you dig what I'm saying. Do you understand what I'm saying? Can you identify? Are you following? You heard me?. It's very particular to New Orleans, maybe Louisiana, but I'm not sure, but definitely New Orleans. And you're going to hear that a lot in this clip, but also, probably when you're talking to some people from New Orleans or listening to music from there. All right. So let's move on to the next line

[00:06:05] And they can be fifty to you everyday, all day. And it's all good. And they can be fifty to you every day, all day. And it's all good. So there's two things I want to explain here. The first one is the pronunciation of the word, fifty F I F T Y. The number, let's say, and he didn't say fifty, he said fitty... fitty. Now, again, depending on where you're from, you might say fifty, or you might say fifty, fifty is faster and easier. Um, So it's really your choice. I'm just trying to get you to understand what he actually said. And it's just a difference of pronunciation. Some people say fifty, some people say fifty, so there you go. 

[00:06:49] And at the end of that sentence, he said, it's all good, which is three words. It's all good. But he kind of blended those words together. Using connected speech and said is'sall'good. It's all good. You see? And when we say it's all good, it just means everything is fine. There's no problems. So you can be a hundred with people, you can be real, you can be authentic and somebody else can still be fake with you. And for them it's no problem. It's all good. Right? All right. Hopefully, that makes sense. So let's move on to the next line. 

[00:07:23] And it's all good. But once you catch on to them being a fifty and you always being a hundred and you start moving differently, guess what they do. They get mad at you. 

[00:07:36] All right. There's a lot I need to explain in that idea right there. He said, but once you catch on to them being fifty. So the first thing is catch on. The phrasal verb catch on basically means to start to understand something. And we typically use catch on in a case where it takes you some time to start to understand what's going on or what's happening. You see what I'm saying?

[00:07:58] So these people can be fifty percent real and authentic with you. They can be fake with you, and it might take you some time to start to understand or really see what's happening, you know? So once you catch on to them, being a fifty and you always being 100, and you start moving differently, which is the next thing I want to explain.

[00:08:17] He says, moving differently. He doesn't mean, like, physically moving. When we say moving in this case, when you start moving differently, he means start behaving differently. You start acting differently, right? We're talking about how you move through the world or through life. It's more figurative. So your behavior, your decisions, your actions, your words, and all that, all of that is included in the way you move. The way you behave, you see? 

[00:08:40] So you start moving differently, you start acting or behaving differently, and guess what they do, they get mad at you. And that's the last thing I want to explain here. 'Cause he said they get mad at you. So you might notice, it sounds a little different. It's not at you because the word ‘at’ ends with the letter T and the word ‘you’ starts with the letter Y. So in almost every case where that happens, a lot of Americans will say 'tchu'. The, the word that ends with a T that's followed by a word that starts with a Y makes a 'tcha' sound. So instead of saying at you, we connect them and say at you, they get mad at you. Okay? 

[00:09:17] So one more time, the whole idea. Once you start to understand and become aware of the fake shit that's going on and you start to move differently or behave differently, guess what happens? They get mad at you. Okay. Hopefully that makes sense. And we gon' move on to the next line.

[00:09:37] Guess what they do. They get mad at you 'cause you done caught on to they fake bullshit they bringing to the table and they doing and what they wanna do. 

[00:09:47] All right. A lot of stuff to explain here, my friend. So here we go. He says, 'cause you done caught on to they fake bullshit. So the first thing you probably know, but just in case you don't, he said, because you done caught on and 'cause, in this case... A lot of Americans will say, 'cause instead of because. The complete word is because, but we kind of shorten it and just say, 'cause, all right? 

[00:10:08] So the next thing is you done caught on. So here he is, he's using the present perfect. But according to the grammar rules, it's grammatically incorrect. 'Cause he should say you have caught on, but a lot of places in the U.S. depending on your culture, the region and things like that, a lot of people would say you done caught on.

[00:10:27] Anytime they're using the present perfect, instead of saying 'have' and then the verb, they say 'done' and then the verb. You done caught on, or you done seen, or you done gone where you done been, instead of you have been, you have caught on, you have seen, you have done. Why? I don't know, but just understand technically it's grammatically incorrect, but you will hear it, you know, depending on the region or the person you're talking to in the U.S. All right? 

[00:10:53] So you should know what caught on means at this point. So you done caught on, or you have caught on to they fake bullshit. Another case where he said they, but technically he should have said their fake bullshit, because we're talking about the bullshit that belongs to them. It's theirs. It's not they, it's their bullshit. You see what I'm saying? But again, depending on where you are, a lot of people speak this way. Instead of saying their they say, they, I don't know why, but they do. So instead of saying, like, they're bullshit or their kids or their money, they would say they bullshit, they kids, they money. But what they mean to say is their, technically. All right? 

[00:11:32] And fake bullshit. You should know what fake means. It's just the opposite of real, the opposite of authentic. And bullshit, in this case, it's kind of like nonsense. They fake nonsense. Ridiculousness, you know, that's the basic idea. So you have caught on to their fake bullshit that they bringing to the table. Another case where he said they, and he should have said they're, or they are because we're using the present continuous here. The fake bullshit that they are bringing to the table, but he said the fake shit that they bringing to the table. It's just faster to say it that way. And again, it's incorrect grammatically, but a lot of people speak that way. All right? 

[00:12:12] So bring to the table, the fake shit that they are bringing to the table. To bring something to the table means to contribute something. So if somebody asks you, “What do you bring to the table?” They're saying, what do you have to contribute? What are you contributing to this situation or relationship or whatever it is. So you have caught on to they fake bullshit that they bringing to the table or bringing to the relationship. You see what I'm saying? 

[00:12:38] And they doing and what they want to do. That's the last thing he said. And that they doing and they want to do, and this was kind of redundant. So it's hard to explain that entire thing. So let me play it one more time and I'll try to explain the last part of that idea.

[00:12:56] Because you done caught on to they fake bullshit they bringing to the table and they doing, and what they want to do. 

[00:13:02] So he said that they bringing to the table, and they doing, and what they want to do. Just kind of being redundant at this point. 'Cause he's saying the fake shit that they are bringing to the table. And then he continues to say that they doing and that they want to do. And he's still talking about the fake bullshit. So the fake bullshit, that one, they are bringing to the table, two, that they are doing, and three, that they want to do. Hopefully, that makes sense. 

[00:13:27] And the last thing I want to explain is he said that they doing another case where he should say they are doing, but he said they doing, I guess it's just faster and easier. 

[00:13:36] And that they want to do... that. Oh, no, he said, “What they want to do.” “And what they want to do.” So the last thing I want to bring to your attention here is instead of saying what they want to do, he used connect to speech and said, “they wanna do.” “And what they wanna do.” Okay? Hopefully, I'm not confusing you. Hopefully, you're still with me.

[00:13:58] It's kind of difficult to explain these things because some of it is cultural, not, it's not just about the language. You know, the reason that we say certain things, even though it's grammatically incorrect, and which people say it this way, it's kind of difficult to explain it. But hopefully, you still with me, I think we're about halfway through the clip, so let's continue.

[00:14:19] And what they want to do. They wanna play victim, and act like you doing them something bad. When the whole time... 

[00:14:25] All right. So the next line, they want to play victim and act like you doing them something bad. Again, a lot to explain. So, he said, “They want to play victim.” Again, it's want to, and you just connect the words and say, wanna. 

[00:14:41] The next thing is play victim. Now, the complete phrase is play the victim, but you can say play victim and it's the same exact thing. And what that means... he's not saying play like have fun or like it's a game or anything like that. He's saying act like the victim. To play someone or something in this context... In this context, to play the victim, to play the hero, to play the boss, to play the employee, whatever, it means to act like this thing. So if you want to play victim, it means you want to act like the victim. You see? 

[00:15:13] So, so they want to play victim and act like you doing them something bad. So again, another case where we're using the present continuous, but he's not using the word 'are' in this case. He just said you doing them something bad. When technically, you should say, 'you are doing' or 'you're doing'. You see? 

[00:15:32] And then he says, 'doing them something bad'. This one is a little hard to explain... doing them something bad. Because it's like a colloquial phrase that we have. If you do somebody some kind of way, it means to treat somebody some kind of way. So if you do somebody wrong, if you do her wrong or do him wrong or do me wrong, it means that you treat me wrong or incorrectly. You do something wrong to me, it's just a colloquial way of speaking. 

[00:15:59] So he's saying you're doing them something bad. Probably sounds a little strange, the sentence structure, but it's very normal to us. You're doing them something bad, which is the same thing as saying you're doing something bad to them. Okay. So I wouldn't recommend that you write this way if you're trying to pass a test or the IELTS or some type of English exam, but you will hear people speak that way in the U.S. All right? Cool. Let's move on to the next line.

[00:16:30] Something bad. When the whole time you've been a hundred and they been fifty. But guess what? Fuck them people, man. Fuck them. Real talk. At end of the day, fuck them people. 

[00:16:43] All right. Actually played too much. Let me go... I played two lines instead of one, but anyway, I'll still explain. When the whole time, you've been a hundred, and they been fifty. So the first thing I want to bring to your attention is he says, 'when the whole time', but he didn't pronounce it like that. He connected the words 'when' and 'the', and he said 'whena'. When the whole time, when the whole time you've been a hundred. 'When-a-whole time', instead of when the whole time. You see? So you don't have to speak this way to sound natural. I just want you to understand every single thing that's being said and the little details and the patterns of speech and pronunciation in some people here in the U.S. All right?

[00:17:28] So when the whole time you've been a hundred and they been fifty. So, another grammar observation. He says, 'you been a hundred'. When technically, you should say 'you have been a hundred' or 'you've been a hundred'. But he omitted the verb 'have' in this case and just said, 'you been'. Okay? It's grammatically incorrect, but very common.

[00:17:50] All right. And then he said they been fifty. So you've been hundred and they been fifty. The same thing. You should say, ' they have been' fifty. But he just omits that verb from his phrase. Probably because it's faster and easier, but like I said, it's grammatically incorrect, just so you know. 

[00:18:06] Then he says, “But guess what? Fuck them people, man. Fuck them people.” Now, the way he pronounced the word, isn't the typical pronunciation. I think he was just putting, you know, emphasis on it. Maybe not to be funny, but he was just putting emphasis on it, just so you know. So let me play it one more time so you can hear it. 

[00:18:26] And they've been fifty. But guess what? Fuck them people, man. Fuck them. Real talk. 

[00:18:33] All right. Fuck them people. So I already talked about the pronunciation of fuck, but then he says, fuck them people when he should say, fuck those people. Okay? But it's just another colloquial thing, instead of saying, you know, 'them', or, excuse me, instead of saying 'those' people, we'll say 'them'. 

[00:18:53] 'I don't like them people', or 'I don't want them things', or some, 'I don't know them people', or something like that when you should be saying those, the grammatically correct thing to say is 'those'. Okay? He said, “fuck them people.”

[00:19:06] Um, and then the next thing I want to bring to your attention is fuck them. Fuck them. Just the way he pronounced it. He didn't say, fuck them. He said, “fuck'em.” “Fuck'em.” So he completely removed the TH from the word 'them' and said “fuck'em.” It's very, very common, a very connected way of saying the words. Fuck'em! Very, very common. All right. Just so you can understand what he said. 

[00:19:31] And then the last thing he said in that phrase was 'real talk'. Real talk is a phrase that just means like, um, this is, what I'm saying is true. What I'm saying is authentic. What I'm saying is real. Real talk. So if somebody says something that you think is absolutely true and you agree with, and you want to kind of emphasize the fact that you do agree and you think it's true and a hundred percent authentic, you can say, “real talk.” You know, I agree. That's real what you just said. That's true. That's authentic. You know? 

[00:19:59] But you can also say it when you're talking, like, “This is my point A, B and C, real talk.” Which is like saying, “This is my point A, B and C, I mean, what I say, you know, this is a hundred percent true and authentic what I'm saying. It's real talk.” You know, what I'm saying is real. That's the idea. All right, let's move on to the next line. 

[00:20:21] ...people, man. Fuck them. Real talk. At end of the day, fuck them people. You heard me? 

[00:20:28] At the end of the day, fuck them people. You heard me? So, at the end of the day is a phrase that just means when all things are taken into consideration. All right. So it's a, an expression let's say. So when everything's taken into consideration, after everything is said and done, which is another way of saying it, fuck them people or those people. Same thing. It's just one is grammatically correct, the other one is not. 

[00:20:54] But at the end of the day, fuck them people, you heard me? So there's that phrase again. That New Orleans phrase 'you heard me?' Maybe Louisiana... I'm not sure, like I said. But let's move on to the next line 'cause it's connected to this line. So let's play them both.

[00:21:09] Fuck them people, you heard me? In the middle of the night, fuck them people. 

[00:21:15] All right. In the middle of the night, fuck them people. Now this isn't something that we say all the time. It's just, it's just a creative way of using the language because the actual expression is 'at the end of the day'. That's normal, everybody uses that and understands that, but then he says, and at, “in the middle of the night.” So he's kind of taking the literal meaning of 'at the end of the day', and then he's playing with the language and saying also in the middle of the night. 

[00:21:40] So 'at the end of the day' just means when everything's taken into consideration, but the literal meaning 'at the end of the day', we're talking about the time of day. You have morning, afternoon, and evening... At the end of the day. So the next line, he's playing with the literal meaning and saying also in the middle of the night, which basically means... he's trying to say all the time, not just in the morning, not just at the end of the day, but also in the middle of the night, fuck them people. Fuck them in the morning. Fuck them in the afternoon. Fuck them in the evening. Fuck them at night. Fuck them a midnight. Fuck them people, all the time. You know? So hopefully you can understand, he's just playing with the language, putting emphasis on the fact that you need to say, “Fuck them people.” Every day, all day. That's the idea. Hopefully, it makes sense. All right, so let's move on to the next line. 

[00:22:28] You heard me? In the middle of the night, fuck them people. Move around them people. Let them be fifty with the fifty people they wanna be fifty with. 

[00:22:38] All right. Like I said, do not feel bad if this is hard to follow, I'm going to explain it for you. Hopefully you'll understand. All right. Move around them people. To move around, in this case, is literal and figurative 'cause to move around basically means to pass to the other side of. Right? So let's imagine these people are in front of you. You pass to the other side of them and you keep moving. You don't let them stop you. You don't let them be an obstacle. Just step to the side and keep moving forward, move around them. All right? 

[00:23:06] Move around them people. Again, you should say 'those' people, but especially if you're watching this on YouTube, you can see the words that I've highlighted in different colors. You can see the patterns of grammar in his speech. You can see the patterns of pronunciation in his speech. All right. So move around 'them' people should be move around 'those' people, technically. All right. 

[00:23:26] Then he says, let them be fifty with the fifty people they wanna be fifty with. Goddamn. So again, the word 'fifty' he's pronouncing 'fitty'. And he says it multiple times, “Let them be fifty with the fifty people they wanna be fifty with.” Okay. 

[00:23:43] He also said 'with the', let them be fifty with the fifty people. But he didn't say 'with the'. He said, “wit'the.” He connected those two words. Let them be fifty with the fifty... with the. Let them be fifty with the fifty people they want to be fifty with. So again, he connected want and to and said 'wanna be fifty with'. So let me say it one more time. Let them be fifty with the fifty people they want to be fifty with. Let them be fake with the fake people they want to be fake with. Okay. 

[00:24:18] Again, don't feel bad if this is kind of hard to follow or understand. You know, it's, it's a colloquial way of speaking, man. So if you can't understand it, don't feel bad. 'Cause this is the type of stuff that they don't really teach in school, they don't expose you to. So this is your first time hearing somebody speak like this is going to be difficult. So don't feel bad if you're still following me at this point, congrats to you because it is difficult, man, but I'm trying to help you understand the way people actually talk here in the United States. There's many different ways to speak English and this is one of them. All right? So let's continue.

[00:24:51] Move around them people. Let them be fifty with the fifty people they wanna be fifty with. You keep being a hundred. Don't let them fifties stop you from being a hundred. 

[00:24:59] All right. So you keep being a hundred. Which.. You should know what that means now. You keep being authentic. You keep.. keeping it a hundred. You keep being real. 

[00:25:09] And the next thing you said is “Don't let them fifties stop you from being hundred.” Another case where he should say, don't let 'those' fifties or fake people keep you or stop you from being a hundred. So don't.. You keep being real. Don't let those fake people stop you from being real. That's the idea here. All right. Next line. 

[00:25:34] Don't let them fifties stop you from being a hundred. You always keep it a thousand. You heard me? No matter what. Just lay there and clear your catalog, close your circle. 

[00:25:44] All right. I played two lines only meant to play one. So let me go back to the first one. 

[00:25:49] Stop you from being a hundred. You always keep it a thousand. You heard me? No matter what. 

[00:25:54] All right, you always keep it at a thousand. So he's just continuing his idea. Don't let the fifties stop you from being a hundred. You always keep it a thousand. And again, when you say keep it a thousand, you're just putting emphasis on the idea of keeping it a hundred. All the way real, all the way authentic. You always keep it a thousand. Always keep it real. You heard me? Right? 

[00:26:14] And then he says, “No matter what.” So when we use the phrase, 'no matter what', it's like saying, 'not under any circumstances, not in any case or situation'. So you always keep it real and you never be fake. You never let somebody else stop you from being real, under any circumstances. No matter what happens. It doesn't matter what happens, regardless of what happens, independent of what happens. You see what I'm saying? That's the idea of when we say 'no matter what', not under any circumstances. Okay? Last line. 

[00:26:44] Just lay there and clear your catalog, close your circle. 

[00:26:49] Just lay there and clear your catalog, close your circle. So the first thing, he used the word, 'just'. In this case, when we use the word 'just', in this context, it means 'simply'. Simply lay there and clear your catalog. 

[00:27:03] So the next thing you says is 'lay there'. And this is a colloquial way of speaking. And when we say 'lay there', we don't mean physically lay down. We just mean sit there or stay in your current position. And that's really what it means. So just sit there, stay in your current position and clear your catalog. 

[00:27:20] So when he says 'clear your catalog', it's a figure of speech. It's like... He's saying.. Let's imagine you have a list of friends in a catalog. Friend, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7. To clear your catalog means to remove everything from the catalog, to clear it, to take it back to zero, to make it so that there's nothing in the catalog. You see? So when he says clear your catalog, he's talking about your list of friends. Lay there, simply sit there and remove all those fake people from your list of friends. That's the idea. 

[00:27:52] And he emphasizes that when he says, “Close your circle.” Because a lot of times, at least in English, we talk about your group of friends or colleagues or associates as 'your circle', your social circle. So when he says 'close your circle', that means it's not open anymore. People don't have access to the circle because you closed it.

[00:28:10] So take or remove everybody, all the fake people from your social circle and close the circle. Don't let anything fake or inauthentic into your circle. Clear your catalog, close your circle. You always keep it a hundred. You always keep it real. Don't let the fake, you know, stop you from being real. That's the idea.

[00:28:33] All right. My friend now, hopefully, hopefully, you should understand every single word that was said in the clip. So let's go back and listen to the entire thing. One more time from start to finish and see if you can get the true message of what's being said here without any help. All right? Let's do it. 

[00:28:51] See, you can be a hundred to people every day, all day, you heard me? And they can be fifty to you every day, all day. And it's all good. But once you catch on to them being a fifty and you always being a hundred, and you start moving differently, guess what they do... They get mad at you. ‘Cause you done caught on to they fake bullshit they bringing to the table, and they doing, and what they want to do. They want to play victim and act like you're doing them something bad. When the whole time, you been a hundred and they been fifty. But guess what? Fuck them people, man. Fuck them. Real talk. At end of the day, fuck them people. You heard me? In the middle of the night, fuck them people. Move around on people. Let them be fifty with the fifty people they want to be fifty with. You keep being a hundred. Don't let them fifties stop you from being a hundred. You always keep a thousand. You heard me? No matter what. Just lay there and clear your catalog, close your circle. 

[00:29:52] All right, my friend. So just in case you still couldn't understand.. Hopefully, you could, but just in case, the main idea of this clip is from time to time, you will find yourself in situations with people who don't appreciate your authenticity or your good nature.

[00:30:06] You might do everything you can to contribute to a relationship, romantic or platonic, by being generous and authentic, and your partner could still take it for granted. You might give them the best of you and still get the worst of them in return. At the end of the day, you have no control over that. You can be a hundred percent authentic and honest with someone and they will still be fake with you. They'll still lie to you, deceive you, and treat you like an invaluable option.

[00:30:35] The resolution to this type of situation isn't to get mad and call them out on it. And you definitely shouldn't start being fake with them because when you do things like that, they will most likely get defensive and try to turn the tables. They'll try to play the victim and make it seem like you're the one that's tripping. You're the one that's being fake now. You see what I'm saying? 

[00:30:55] You simply need to say, “Fuck them.” Respectfully. Don't let someone else's fake behavior influence you and change your authentic behavior. Just remove the fake, deceitful, and unappreciative people from your life. Close your circle and continue to keep it a hundred. No matter what. Peace.

[END OF PODCAST]

Writing prompts

  • What did you think of this man's accent? Was it difficult to understand?
  • If you could visit any region of the U.S. which would it be?
  • Write about a time that a close friend or relative wasn't genuine with you.
  • Write about a time you weren't genuine with someone else.
Key Vocabulary & Grammar Guide
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Key Vocabulary Guide

Transcript

[00:00:00] What's up, everybody? You're listening to another episode of Life in English. I'm your host Tony Kaizen. And this episode is a reminder to always keep it a hundred.

[00:00:15] All right, y'all in this episode, we are going to take a trip down South to New Orleans, Louisiana. I found another interesting clip that will not only expose you to more real American English, but also send you a valuable message. 

[00:00:27] So first, I'll play the clip from start to finish and next I'll walk you through the clip line by line to make sure you understand everything that is being said. And don't feel if you don't understand the clip, the first time you hear it, the New Orleans accent is very particular and it's hard to understand if you're not familiar with it. But let's not waste any more time, let's get into this episode. 

[00:00:51] See, you could be a hundred to people every day, all day. You heard me? And they could be fifty to you every day, all day. And it's all good. But once you catch on to them being a fifty and you always being a hundred, and you start moving differently, guess what they do. They get mad at you. 'Cause you done caught on to they fake bullshit they bringing to the table, and they doing, and what they want to do. They want to play victim and act like you doing them some bad.

[00:01:22] When the whole time you been a hundred and they been fifty. But guess what? Fuck them people, man. Fuck them. Real talk. At the end of the day, fuck them people. You heard me? In the middle of the night, fuck them people. 

[00:01:36] Move around them people. Let them be fifty with the fifty people they want to be fifty with. You keep being a hundred. Don't let them fifties stop you from being a hundred. You always keep it a thousand. You heard me? No matter what. Just lay there and clear your catalog, close your circle

[00:01:51] All right, y'all, like I said before, don't feel bad if you couldn't understand the entire clip or even the majority of it. I'm sure there are even some people in the U.S. that would have a hard time understanding this accent and dialect.

[00:02:04] So first, let me explain what it means when we say 'keep it a hundred'. To keep it a hundred simply means to stay true to yourself. In other words, it means to be yourself and live by your values, no matter what someone else says or thinks about it. 

[00:02:17] So, 'keep it' means to maintain it the way it is or to maintain it in your possession.

[00:02:24] Now, the idea of a hundred is that the number 100 represents completeness or fullness. Like when you get a hundred percent on your English exam or you feel a hundred percent healthy, right? So if you're keeping it in a hundred, you're being a hundred percent, your authentic self. Right? Now, to keep it a hundred can also mean to be honest, which is more or less the same thing, depending on how you look at it.

[00:02:47] For example, I might say, “I'ma keep it a hundred with you.” And just in case you couldn't understand that, another way or... yeah, another way of saying that is, “I'm going to keep it one hundred with you.” But naturally I would say. “I'ma keep it a hundred with you.” Which is the same thing as saying, “I'm going to be completely honest with you.” 

[00:03:07] I'm gonna keep it a hundred with you, bro. Like, I'm gonna be honest with you. You see what I'm saying? 

[00:03:11] Now, there are a few variations of this phrase as well, so we can say keep it a hundred or keep it a thousand, keep it a band, keep it a stack, keep it all the way tall or simply keep it real. Like I said, these all mean the same thing.

[00:03:26] So when you think of a thousand, it's a hundred times ten. So it's just kind of, like, emphasis on the phrase. You're saying all the way real, one hundred and fifty percent, a thousand percent real and authentic. 

[00:03:38] Now, the word 'band', in this case, is slang for a thousand. And the same thing with the word 'stack'. A stack is $1,000. So to keep it a band or keep it a stack needs to keep it a thousand, which means to keep it a hundred. You see what I'm saying? 

[00:03:52] And to keep it all the way tall is similar to the phrase straight up, which just means honest or direct or a hundred percent real. Now, I don't want to start to confuse you. So we'll stay focused on this phrase for now. And just remember that at the end of the day, they all mean the same thing. Keep it real, keep it a band, keep it all the way tall, keep it a hundred. It's all the same. 

[00:04:14] So now you should understand the meaning of the phrase, keep it a hundred. So let's listen to the clip again, so you can understand everything that was said and the true message of this man's words. So let's do it. 

[00:04:27] See, you can be a hundred to people every day, all day, you heard me?

[00:04:35] Alright. See, you can be a hundred to people every day, all day. You heard me. So there's a couple of things I want to explain in this line. The first one, the pronunciation of the words, a hundred. 

[00:04:47] It's very common here in the U.S., depending on where you're from and what your culture is, we don't pronounce the words a hundred. It's much faster and easier, um, to say, 'uh hunnid'. 'Uh hunnid'. You can be a hundred with people, or you can be one hundred or a hundred. It's the same thing, just a difference of pronunciation. 

[00:05:05] So then he said, “You heard me?” at the end of the sentence. You heard me? And this is a phrase that's very particular to New Orleans. I don't know if they say in other parts of Louisiana or in other states near Louisiana, but I know for sure in New Orleans they say, “You heard me?”

[00:05:22] Which is the words 'you heard me'. Right? And technically the grammatically correct way to ask, 'cause it is a question, so the grammatically correct way to say that is, “Did you hear me?” Right? But a more, let's say, informal way of asking the question is, “You heard me?” Right? 

[00:05:40] And that's the same thing as saying, you feel me, you dig what I'm saying. Do you understand what I'm saying? Can you identify? Are you following? You heard me?. It's very particular to New Orleans, maybe Louisiana, but I'm not sure, but definitely New Orleans. And you're going to hear that a lot in this clip, but also, probably when you're talking to some people from New Orleans or listening to music from there. All right. So let's move on to the next line

[00:06:05] And they can be fifty to you everyday, all day. And it's all good. And they can be fifty to you every day, all day. And it's all good. So there's two things I want to explain here. The first one is the pronunciation of the word, fifty F I F T Y. The number, let's say, and he didn't say fifty, he said fitty... fitty. Now, again, depending on where you're from, you might say fifty, or you might say fifty, fifty is faster and easier. Um, So it's really your choice. I'm just trying to get you to understand what he actually said. And it's just a difference of pronunciation. Some people say fifty, some people say fifty, so there you go. 

[00:06:49] And at the end of that sentence, he said, it's all good, which is three words. It's all good. But he kind of blended those words together. Using connected speech and said is'sall'good. It's all good. You see? And when we say it's all good, it just means everything is fine. There's no problems. So you can be a hundred with people, you can be real, you can be authentic and somebody else can still be fake with you. And for them it's no problem. It's all good. Right? All right. Hopefully, that makes sense. So let's move on to the next line. 

[00:07:23] And it's all good. But once you catch on to them being a fifty and you always being a hundred and you start moving differently, guess what they do. They get mad at you. 

[00:07:36] All right. There's a lot I need to explain in that idea right there. He said, but once you catch on to them being fifty. So the first thing is catch on. The phrasal verb catch on basically means to start to understand something. And we typically use catch on in a case where it takes you some time to start to understand what's going on or what's happening. You see what I'm saying?

[00:07:58] So these people can be fifty percent real and authentic with you. They can be fake with you, and it might take you some time to start to understand or really see what's happening, you know? So once you catch on to them, being a fifty and you always being 100, and you start moving differently, which is the next thing I want to explain.

[00:08:17] He says, moving differently. He doesn't mean, like, physically moving. When we say moving in this case, when you start moving differently, he means start behaving differently. You start acting differently, right? We're talking about how you move through the world or through life. It's more figurative. So your behavior, your decisions, your actions, your words, and all that, all of that is included in the way you move. The way you behave, you see? 

[00:08:40] So you start moving differently, you start acting or behaving differently, and guess what they do, they get mad at you. And that's the last thing I want to explain here. 'Cause he said they get mad at you. So you might notice, it sounds a little different. It's not at you because the word ‘at’ ends with the letter T and the word ‘you’ starts with the letter Y. So in almost every case where that happens, a lot of Americans will say 'tchu'. The, the word that ends with a T that's followed by a word that starts with a Y makes a 'tcha' sound. So instead of saying at you, we connect them and say at you, they get mad at you. Okay? 

[00:09:17] So one more time, the whole idea. Once you start to understand and become aware of the fake shit that's going on and you start to move differently or behave differently, guess what happens? They get mad at you. Okay. Hopefully that makes sense. And we gon' move on to the next line.

[00:09:37] Guess what they do. They get mad at you 'cause you done caught on to they fake bullshit they bringing to the table and they doing and what they wanna do. 

[00:09:47] All right. A lot of stuff to explain here, my friend. So here we go. He says, 'cause you done caught on to they fake bullshit. So the first thing you probably know, but just in case you don't, he said, because you done caught on and 'cause, in this case... A lot of Americans will say, 'cause instead of because. The complete word is because, but we kind of shorten it and just say, 'cause, all right? 

[00:10:08] So the next thing is you done caught on. So here he is, he's using the present perfect. But according to the grammar rules, it's grammatically incorrect. 'Cause he should say you have caught on, but a lot of places in the U.S. depending on your culture, the region and things like that, a lot of people would say you done caught on.

[00:10:27] Anytime they're using the present perfect, instead of saying 'have' and then the verb, they say 'done' and then the verb. You done caught on, or you done seen, or you done gone where you done been, instead of you have been, you have caught on, you have seen, you have done. Why? I don't know, but just understand technically it's grammatically incorrect, but you will hear it, you know, depending on the region or the person you're talking to in the U.S. All right? 

[00:10:53] So you should know what caught on means at this point. So you done caught on, or you have caught on to they fake bullshit. Another case where he said they, but technically he should have said their fake bullshit, because we're talking about the bullshit that belongs to them. It's theirs. It's not they, it's their bullshit. You see what I'm saying? But again, depending on where you are, a lot of people speak this way. Instead of saying their they say, they, I don't know why, but they do. So instead of saying, like, they're bullshit or their kids or their money, they would say they bullshit, they kids, they money. But what they mean to say is their, technically. All right? 

[00:11:32] And fake bullshit. You should know what fake means. It's just the opposite of real, the opposite of authentic. And bullshit, in this case, it's kind of like nonsense. They fake nonsense. Ridiculousness, you know, that's the basic idea. So you have caught on to their fake bullshit that they bringing to the table. Another case where he said they, and he should have said they're, or they are because we're using the present continuous here. The fake bullshit that they are bringing to the table, but he said the fake shit that they bringing to the table. It's just faster to say it that way. And again, it's incorrect grammatically, but a lot of people speak that way. All right? 

[00:12:12] So bring to the table, the fake shit that they are bringing to the table. To bring something to the table means to contribute something. So if somebody asks you, “What do you bring to the table?” They're saying, what do you have to contribute? What are you contributing to this situation or relationship or whatever it is. So you have caught on to they fake bullshit that they bringing to the table or bringing to the relationship. You see what I'm saying? 

[00:12:38] And they doing and what they want to do. That's the last thing he said. And that they doing and they want to do, and this was kind of redundant. So it's hard to explain that entire thing. So let me play it one more time and I'll try to explain the last part of that idea.

[00:12:56] Because you done caught on to they fake bullshit they bringing to the table and they doing, and what they want to do. 

[00:13:02] So he said that they bringing to the table, and they doing, and what they want to do. Just kind of being redundant at this point. 'Cause he's saying the fake shit that they are bringing to the table. And then he continues to say that they doing and that they want to do. And he's still talking about the fake bullshit. So the fake bullshit, that one, they are bringing to the table, two, that they are doing, and three, that they want to do. Hopefully, that makes sense. 

[00:13:27] And the last thing I want to explain is he said that they doing another case where he should say they are doing, but he said they doing, I guess it's just faster and easier. 

[00:13:36] And that they want to do... that. Oh, no, he said, “What they want to do.” “And what they want to do.” So the last thing I want to bring to your attention here is instead of saying what they want to do, he used connect to speech and said, “they wanna do.” “And what they wanna do.” Okay? Hopefully, I'm not confusing you. Hopefully, you're still with me.

[00:13:58] It's kind of difficult to explain these things because some of it is cultural, not, it's not just about the language. You know, the reason that we say certain things, even though it's grammatically incorrect, and which people say it this way, it's kind of difficult to explain it. But hopefully, you still with me, I think we're about halfway through the clip, so let's continue.

[00:14:19] And what they want to do. They wanna play victim, and act like you doing them something bad. When the whole time... 

[00:14:25] All right. So the next line, they want to play victim and act like you doing them something bad. Again, a lot to explain. So, he said, “They want to play victim.” Again, it's want to, and you just connect the words and say, wanna. 

[00:14:41] The next thing is play victim. Now, the complete phrase is play the victim, but you can say play victim and it's the same exact thing. And what that means... he's not saying play like have fun or like it's a game or anything like that. He's saying act like the victim. To play someone or something in this context... In this context, to play the victim, to play the hero, to play the boss, to play the employee, whatever, it means to act like this thing. So if you want to play victim, it means you want to act like the victim. You see? 

[00:15:13] So, so they want to play victim and act like you doing them something bad. So again, another case where we're using the present continuous, but he's not using the word 'are' in this case. He just said you doing them something bad. When technically, you should say, 'you are doing' or 'you're doing'. You see? 

[00:15:32] And then he says, 'doing them something bad'. This one is a little hard to explain... doing them something bad. Because it's like a colloquial phrase that we have. If you do somebody some kind of way, it means to treat somebody some kind of way. So if you do somebody wrong, if you do her wrong or do him wrong or do me wrong, it means that you treat me wrong or incorrectly. You do something wrong to me, it's just a colloquial way of speaking. 

[00:15:59] So he's saying you're doing them something bad. Probably sounds a little strange, the sentence structure, but it's very normal to us. You're doing them something bad, which is the same thing as saying you're doing something bad to them. Okay. So I wouldn't recommend that you write this way if you're trying to pass a test or the IELTS or some type of English exam, but you will hear people speak that way in the U.S. All right? Cool. Let's move on to the next line.

[00:16:30] Something bad. When the whole time you've been a hundred and they been fifty. But guess what? Fuck them people, man. Fuck them. Real talk. At end of the day, fuck them people. 

[00:16:43] All right. Actually played too much. Let me go... I played two lines instead of one, but anyway, I'll still explain. When the whole time, you've been a hundred, and they been fifty. So the first thing I want to bring to your attention is he says, 'when the whole time', but he didn't pronounce it like that. He connected the words 'when' and 'the', and he said 'whena'. When the whole time, when the whole time you've been a hundred. 'When-a-whole time', instead of when the whole time. You see? So you don't have to speak this way to sound natural. I just want you to understand every single thing that's being said and the little details and the patterns of speech and pronunciation in some people here in the U.S. All right?

[00:17:28] So when the whole time you've been a hundred and they been fifty. So, another grammar observation. He says, 'you been a hundred'. When technically, you should say 'you have been a hundred' or 'you've been a hundred'. But he omitted the verb 'have' in this case and just said, 'you been'. Okay? It's grammatically incorrect, but very common.

[00:17:50] All right. And then he said they been fifty. So you've been hundred and they been fifty. The same thing. You should say, ' they have been' fifty. But he just omits that verb from his phrase. Probably because it's faster and easier, but like I said, it's grammatically incorrect, just so you know. 

[00:18:06] Then he says, “But guess what? Fuck them people, man. Fuck them people.” Now, the way he pronounced the word, isn't the typical pronunciation. I think he was just putting, you know, emphasis on it. Maybe not to be funny, but he was just putting emphasis on it, just so you know. So let me play it one more time so you can hear it. 

[00:18:26] And they've been fifty. But guess what? Fuck them people, man. Fuck them. Real talk. 

[00:18:33] All right. Fuck them people. So I already talked about the pronunciation of fuck, but then he says, fuck them people when he should say, fuck those people. Okay? But it's just another colloquial thing, instead of saying, you know, 'them', or, excuse me, instead of saying 'those' people, we'll say 'them'. 

[00:18:53] 'I don't like them people', or 'I don't want them things', or some, 'I don't know them people', or something like that when you should be saying those, the grammatically correct thing to say is 'those'. Okay? He said, “fuck them people.”

[00:19:06] Um, and then the next thing I want to bring to your attention is fuck them. Fuck them. Just the way he pronounced it. He didn't say, fuck them. He said, “fuck'em.” “Fuck'em.” So he completely removed the TH from the word 'them' and said “fuck'em.” It's very, very common, a very connected way of saying the words. Fuck'em! Very, very common. All right. Just so you can understand what he said. 

[00:19:31] And then the last thing he said in that phrase was 'real talk'. Real talk is a phrase that just means like, um, this is, what I'm saying is true. What I'm saying is authentic. What I'm saying is real. Real talk. So if somebody says something that you think is absolutely true and you agree with, and you want to kind of emphasize the fact that you do agree and you think it's true and a hundred percent authentic, you can say, “real talk.” You know, I agree. That's real what you just said. That's true. That's authentic. You know? 

[00:19:59] But you can also say it when you're talking, like, “This is my point A, B and C, real talk.” Which is like saying, “This is my point A, B and C, I mean, what I say, you know, this is a hundred percent true and authentic what I'm saying. It's real talk.” You know, what I'm saying is real. That's the idea. All right, let's move on to the next line. 

[00:20:21] ...people, man. Fuck them. Real talk. At end of the day, fuck them people. You heard me? 

[00:20:28] At the end of the day, fuck them people. You heard me? So, at the end of the day is a phrase that just means when all things are taken into consideration. All right. So it's a, an expression let's say. So when everything's taken into consideration, after everything is said and done, which is another way of saying it, fuck them people or those people. Same thing. It's just one is grammatically correct, the other one is not. 

[00:20:54] But at the end of the day, fuck them people, you heard me? So there's that phrase again. That New Orleans phrase 'you heard me?' Maybe Louisiana... I'm not sure, like I said. But let's move on to the next line 'cause it's connected to this line. So let's play them both.

[00:21:09] Fuck them people, you heard me? In the middle of the night, fuck them people. 

[00:21:15] All right. In the middle of the night, fuck them people. Now this isn't something that we say all the time. It's just, it's just a creative way of using the language because the actual expression is 'at the end of the day'. That's normal, everybody uses that and understands that, but then he says, and at, “in the middle of the night.” So he's kind of taking the literal meaning of 'at the end of the day', and then he's playing with the language and saying also in the middle of the night. 

[00:21:40] So 'at the end of the day' just means when everything's taken into consideration, but the literal meaning 'at the end of the day', we're talking about the time of day. You have morning, afternoon, and evening... At the end of the day. So the next line, he's playing with the literal meaning and saying also in the middle of the night, which basically means... he's trying to say all the time, not just in the morning, not just at the end of the day, but also in the middle of the night, fuck them people. Fuck them in the morning. Fuck them in the afternoon. Fuck them in the evening. Fuck them at night. Fuck them a midnight. Fuck them people, all the time. You know? So hopefully you can understand, he's just playing with the language, putting emphasis on the fact that you need to say, “Fuck them people.” Every day, all day. That's the idea. Hopefully, it makes sense. All right, so let's move on to the next line. 

[00:22:28] You heard me? In the middle of the night, fuck them people. Move around them people. Let them be fifty with the fifty people they wanna be fifty with. 

[00:22:38] All right. Like I said, do not feel bad if this is hard to follow, I'm going to explain it for you. Hopefully you'll understand. All right. Move around them people. To move around, in this case, is literal and figurative 'cause to move around basically means to pass to the other side of. Right? So let's imagine these people are in front of you. You pass to the other side of them and you keep moving. You don't let them stop you. You don't let them be an obstacle. Just step to the side and keep moving forward, move around them. All right? 

[00:23:06] Move around them people. Again, you should say 'those' people, but especially if you're watching this on YouTube, you can see the words that I've highlighted in different colors. You can see the patterns of grammar in his speech. You can see the patterns of pronunciation in his speech. All right. So move around 'them' people should be move around 'those' people, technically. All right. 

[00:23:26] Then he says, let them be fifty with the fifty people they wanna be fifty with. Goddamn. So again, the word 'fifty' he's pronouncing 'fitty'. And he says it multiple times, “Let them be fifty with the fifty people they wanna be fifty with.” Okay. 

[00:23:43] He also said 'with the', let them be fifty with the fifty people. But he didn't say 'with the'. He said, “wit'the.” He connected those two words. Let them be fifty with the fifty... with the. Let them be fifty with the fifty people they want to be fifty with. So again, he connected want and to and said 'wanna be fifty with'. So let me say it one more time. Let them be fifty with the fifty people they want to be fifty with. Let them be fake with the fake people they want to be fake with. Okay. 

[00:24:18] Again, don't feel bad if this is kind of hard to follow or understand. You know, it's, it's a colloquial way of speaking, man. So if you can't understand it, don't feel bad. 'Cause this is the type of stuff that they don't really teach in school, they don't expose you to. So this is your first time hearing somebody speak like this is going to be difficult. So don't feel bad if you're still following me at this point, congrats to you because it is difficult, man, but I'm trying to help you understand the way people actually talk here in the United States. There's many different ways to speak English and this is one of them. All right? So let's continue.

[00:24:51] Move around them people. Let them be fifty with the fifty people they wanna be fifty with. You keep being a hundred. Don't let them fifties stop you from being a hundred. 

[00:24:59] All right. So you keep being a hundred. Which.. You should know what that means now. You keep being authentic. You keep.. keeping it a hundred. You keep being real. 

[00:25:09] And the next thing you said is “Don't let them fifties stop you from being hundred.” Another case where he should say, don't let 'those' fifties or fake people keep you or stop you from being a hundred. So don't.. You keep being real. Don't let those fake people stop you from being real. That's the idea here. All right. Next line. 

[00:25:34] Don't let them fifties stop you from being a hundred. You always keep it a thousand. You heard me? No matter what. Just lay there and clear your catalog, close your circle. 

[00:25:44] All right. I played two lines only meant to play one. So let me go back to the first one. 

[00:25:49] Stop you from being a hundred. You always keep it a thousand. You heard me? No matter what. 

[00:25:54] All right, you always keep it at a thousand. So he's just continuing his idea. Don't let the fifties stop you from being a hundred. You always keep it a thousand. And again, when you say keep it a thousand, you're just putting emphasis on the idea of keeping it a hundred. All the way real, all the way authentic. You always keep it a thousand. Always keep it real. You heard me? Right? 

[00:26:14] And then he says, “No matter what.” So when we use the phrase, 'no matter what', it's like saying, 'not under any circumstances, not in any case or situation'. So you always keep it real and you never be fake. You never let somebody else stop you from being real, under any circumstances. No matter what happens. It doesn't matter what happens, regardless of what happens, independent of what happens. You see what I'm saying? That's the idea of when we say 'no matter what', not under any circumstances. Okay? Last line. 

[00:26:44] Just lay there and clear your catalog, close your circle. 

[00:26:49] Just lay there and clear your catalog, close your circle. So the first thing, he used the word, 'just'. In this case, when we use the word 'just', in this context, it means 'simply'. Simply lay there and clear your catalog. 

[00:27:03] So the next thing you says is 'lay there'. And this is a colloquial way of speaking. And when we say 'lay there', we don't mean physically lay down. We just mean sit there or stay in your current position. And that's really what it means. So just sit there, stay in your current position and clear your catalog. 

[00:27:20] So when he says 'clear your catalog', it's a figure of speech. It's like... He's saying.. Let's imagine you have a list of friends in a catalog. Friend, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7. To clear your catalog means to remove everything from the catalog, to clear it, to take it back to zero, to make it so that there's nothing in the catalog. You see? So when he says clear your catalog, he's talking about your list of friends. Lay there, simply sit there and remove all those fake people from your list of friends. That's the idea. 

[00:27:52] And he emphasizes that when he says, “Close your circle.” Because a lot of times, at least in English, we talk about your group of friends or colleagues or associates as 'your circle', your social circle. So when he says 'close your circle', that means it's not open anymore. People don't have access to the circle because you closed it.

[00:28:10] So take or remove everybody, all the fake people from your social circle and close the circle. Don't let anything fake or inauthentic into your circle. Clear your catalog, close your circle. You always keep it a hundred. You always keep it real. Don't let the fake, you know, stop you from being real. That's the idea.

[00:28:33] All right. My friend now, hopefully, hopefully, you should understand every single word that was said in the clip. So let's go back and listen to the entire thing. One more time from start to finish and see if you can get the true message of what's being said here without any help. All right? Let's do it. 

[00:28:51] See, you can be a hundred to people every day, all day, you heard me? And they can be fifty to you every day, all day. And it's all good. But once you catch on to them being a fifty and you always being a hundred, and you start moving differently, guess what they do... They get mad at you. ‘Cause you done caught on to they fake bullshit they bringing to the table, and they doing, and what they want to do. They want to play victim and act like you're doing them something bad. When the whole time, you been a hundred and they been fifty. But guess what? Fuck them people, man. Fuck them. Real talk. At end of the day, fuck them people. You heard me? In the middle of the night, fuck them people. Move around on people. Let them be fifty with the fifty people they want to be fifty with. You keep being a hundred. Don't let them fifties stop you from being a hundred. You always keep a thousand. You heard me? No matter what. Just lay there and clear your catalog, close your circle. 

[00:29:52] All right, my friend. So just in case you still couldn't understand.. Hopefully, you could, but just in case, the main idea of this clip is from time to time, you will find yourself in situations with people who don't appreciate your authenticity or your good nature.

[00:30:06] You might do everything you can to contribute to a relationship, romantic or platonic, by being generous and authentic, and your partner could still take it for granted. You might give them the best of you and still get the worst of them in return. At the end of the day, you have no control over that. You can be a hundred percent authentic and honest with someone and they will still be fake with you. They'll still lie to you, deceive you, and treat you like an invaluable option.

[00:30:35] The resolution to this type of situation isn't to get mad and call them out on it. And you definitely shouldn't start being fake with them because when you do things like that, they will most likely get defensive and try to turn the tables. They'll try to play the victim and make it seem like you're the one that's tripping. You're the one that's being fake now. You see what I'm saying? 

[00:30:55] You simply need to say, “Fuck them.” Respectfully. Don't let someone else's fake behavior influence you and change your authentic behavior. Just remove the fake, deceitful, and unappreciative people from your life. Close your circle and continue to keep it a hundred. No matter what. Peace.

[END OF PODCAST]

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