#117 - Will Moving to Another Country Help Me Become Fluent?

November 24, 2021

Allow me to dispel a common misconception about moving to another country to learn a language.

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[00:00:00] What's up, everybody? You're listening to another episode of Life in English. I'm your host, Tony Kaizen. And in this episode, I want to talk about the common question, "Will moving to another country help me become fluent?"

[00:00:19] The Life and English Podcast is designed to teach you the real American English that you won't learn in school. And it's made possible by our VIP community by becoming a VIP member of the Life in English Community, you'll get access to our Private Conversation Group, bonus podcast episodes, interactive transcripts, and vocabulary and grammar guides. If you'd like to join the community, you can visit lifeinenglish.net/vip.

[00:00:42] There's a really common misconception about the idea that moving to another country will help you become fluent in a language. And although I think it definitely can help, you know, because when you're in a foreign country and nobody speaks your language, if you don't learn to communicate, you probably will have a hard time surviving. So the fact that you're forced to use the language and communicate is positive because you have.. you really have no choice at that point, and you're naturally going to start to learn common words and phrases and how to survive in basic situations like at the post office, the restaurant, bars, on the bus and things like that. The basic stuff, of course, you're going to learn.

[00:01:24] But what I think a lot of people don't understand is that moving to a foreign country to learn the language isn't, like, the most effective solution to your problem. And when I say problem, I mean, you don't speak this language that you want to learn how to speak. You don't know how to communicate effectively yet. That's the problem or the situation, let's say. And you think, you know, "There's no way I could do it from my home. So the only way I can become fluent in English is if I move to an English-speaking country and I stay there for three or six or twelve months. That's the only way.

[00:02:01] And although, like I said, it will have a positive effect on your English speaking skills and your understanding of the language and culture and things like that... When you stop and think about how much money that's going to cost you. I'm not sure it's the best solution. You know what I mean? I'm not sure it's the best option. And I'll tell you why. You have access to the internet, which means you have access to the world and all the people in it, or at least all the people with social media accounts and websites and emails and things like that, which is most people that have electronic devices, let's say. It's millions, billions of people. That's what I'm trying to say.

[00:02:40] And you can talk to these people, most of the time, for free. Right? You have language exchange apps, you have language exchange websites, you have social media, YouTube channels, private conversation groups, and things like that. You have so many options and so many ways to talk to people for free online from the comfort of your home, you could be at the gym, you could be on the bus, you could be walking through the park on the phone with somebody in Japan. For free. For free. You see what I'm saying?

[00:03:14] So again, I've said this multiple times, English courses.. very valuable, very important, very useful. English teachers.. Valuable, important, and useful. Traveling to the foreign country, a priceless experience. If you can do it, do it. Don't think twice about it. So now that we got that out the way, I'm just saying, is it the best option for you right now? Do you really believe the only way you can learn a language is by moving to the country? Because in your mind, then “Oh, I'll be forced to use the language, so then I'll be forced to learn."

[00:03:48] I don't think so, because what you've got to understand is most people in my experience, most people come to this country or go to some other foreign country with that idea in their minds, which is "I'll be forced to use the language." Excuse me, "I'll be forced to use the language so then I'll learn." And then they go and they sit in their hotel all day, or they go and just walk around the city looking at buildings. And, you know, then they go into restaurants and ask for food. They go on the bus and say hello to the bus driver, and that's it.

[00:04:17] They're not making any friends. They're not communicating with people. They're not going out to bars or clubs or places where they can find other people to interact with. They're not doing any of that. They sit inside their little shell, kind of just watching everything happen and then they come back home and say, "Oh, I've been to that place. Yeah, I've been there. I've been to the U.S. 15 times and I still don't speak English."

[00:04:40] It's like... So what I'm trying to say is with that example, what I'm trying to say is clearly just going to that place isn't the only thing you need, because if you're afraid to talk to people right now online in the comfort of your own home, what makes you think you're going to just miraculously turn into this social butterfly when you go to the foreign country and nobody even speaks your language? What makes you think that is just going to solve all your problems? Spending hundreds or thousands of dollars on plane tickets, accommodation, visas, taxes, currency exchange rates, all of that just to learn the foreign language. There's a better option, bro. It's called a language exchange or a private language teacher or something like that. You know what I'm saying?

[00:05:28] What I think you have to figure out first, what I think you have to do first is just get comfortable talking to people. And the easiest, most cost-effective way to do that. It's just finding a language exchange partner. Like, I learned how to speak Spanish before I went to Mexico. I learned how to speak Portuguese before I went to Brazil, without leaving my house, for free. You see what I'm saying? And I'm not like some special genius or something like that, anybody can do it, I know many other people that have done it, you know, before they ever went to the country. Just like I know a bunch of people that simply went to the foreign country thinking, "OK, this is going to make me fluent. I just need to live there. That's the only way."

[00:06:11] And they come back and you ask them about their experience. "What did you do? Did you make any friends? Did you improve your English?"

[00:06:17] "No, not really. It's hard to make friends, and I didn't know where to go or what to do, so I kind of just walked around and stayed to myself, or I found other people that speak my language and I talk to them all the time."

[00:06:30] That's what most people do. There are people that live or have lived in the U.S. for decades and still don't speak English. Happens all the time. So simply going to that place where they speak the language increases the chance that you will find people that speak that language, but you still have to approach them and talk to them. And if you can't do that, what are you going to do? How are you going to learn and improve and become fluent just because you're there? You see what I'm saying?

[00:07:00] So the point I'm trying to make is, yeah, moving to the foreign country increases the chances that you become fluent, of course. But if you're not going to be actively putting yourself in situations Where you have to use the language, interact with the language, immerse yourself in the culture. What's the point in spending all that money to go to that country? You could sit at home on your couch, on your phone, or your computer and talk to hundreds of people from that country for free and become fluent in the language.

[00:07:34] So this idea that "You just have to go to the country, that's the only way you'll be fluent." I say bullshit. It's bullshit. Just learn how to talk to people, learn how to have conversations, learn how to be interested in other people, and you'll always have somebody to talk to, which means you'll always have opportunities to improve your language and communication skills. You don't need to travel halfway around the world to do that. Most likely, you're just going to waste money in time traveling halfway around the world to do that. Because if you can't, you know, step outside your comfort zone and approach somebody online for free with very little risk or without even really having to feel hard rejection, what makes you think you'll be able to do it in person in that country halfway across the world? You know? Just something to think about.

[00:08:25] You have so many tools. So much technology at your disposal. Most of it is free. Why not use it so that when you finally get the chance to go to the country, you're not thinking about becoming fluent in the language, you’re just thinking about enjoying the experience? Using the language like the tool that is to communicate with the people to get what you want to go, where you want to go, to meet who you want to meet, to create those memorable experiences. You know what I'm saying?

[00:08:51] This is just the way I think about it. Obviously, you could disagree. You might have a different philosophy, but it's just weird that you hear all the time, people think "When I finally," it's like this destination addiction that people have. "When I finally get the chance to go to that place, then I'll practice my English and then I'll become fluent because it's an obligation at that point."

[00:09:09] But if you can't obligate yourself to do it at home, when nobody's forcing you to do it, what makes you think you'll do it when you go to that country? You're just going to do what you always do, which is just enough to get by, just enough to survive. So it's about your mindset. You have to create the immersive environment where.. Wherever you are right now. Not wait until this, you know, imaginary moment in time when you'll be forced to do it. That doesn't make sense, you know, and that's the concept of Life in English. Because I learned, after learning Spanish and Portuguese from my home, that if you just live your life in that language now you'll learn that language now. You see what I'm saying?

[00:09:55] I don't know, like, my experiences in Mexico and Brazil would have been completely different if I had waited to start learning the language until after I arrived in those countries. I would not have had half of the amazing experiences I had. If I hadn't chosen to start learning the languages months and in some cases years before I went to the country. You know?

[00:10:20] So anyway, man, like I said, it's just something to think about. You don't need to travel to some foreign country to learn the language. You have the internet, it's fucking free. There are hundreds of teachers online offering courses for reasonable prices that will teach you what you really need to know. There are tens, maybe even hundreds of platforms where you can find people to talk to for free.

[00:10:43] You know, so it's not about what situation you need to be in to become fluent or what location you need to be in to become fluent. It's about what you are going to have the discipline to make yourself do on a regular basis, consistently, day in and day out. The effort that you're going to put into it determines what the result is going to be. You shouldn't be waiting for some external force to obligate you to do something that not only you want to do, but you know you need to do. You know? You need to do that now.

[00:11:16] So if finding a private teacher or a language exchange partner is not your number one priority at the moment, it just tells me you're not really serious about learning how to communicate in English. We might disagree on that, but again, it's just my opinion. It just tells me you're not serious. Because we've already established that's the best way to improve. Everybody watches videos, listens to podcasts, reads books and news articles, and is on social media consuming content in English. But how many people are talking to another human being on a regular basis? Not very many. Not very many... Which is why not very many people, relatively not very many people reach this high level of English fluency that everybody says they want. You know?

[00:12:05] So if this is the first time you've ever heard somebody say this, or maybe you've heard it before and you never took it seriously, you know, hopefully, you can get what I'm trying to say, And you'll at least consider what I'm saying. Moving to another country isn't the key to becoming fluent. Living your life in that language is the key to becoming fluent, and you can do that from anywhere in the world. Anywhere. Stop making excuses and just do what you know you need to do. In my opinion, it's that simple. So... There you go.

[00:12:41] This is Life in English. I'm your host, Tony Kaizen, and I'll talk to you later. Peace.

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[00:00:00] What's up, everybody? You're listening to another episode of Life in English. I'm your host, Tony Kaizen. And in this episode, I want to talk about the common question, "Will moving to another country help me become fluent?"

[00:00:19] The Life and English Podcast is designed to teach you the real American English that you won't learn in school. And it's made possible by our VIP community by becoming a VIP member of the Life in English Community, you'll get access to our Private Conversation Group, bonus podcast episodes, interactive transcripts, and vocabulary and grammar guides. If you'd like to join the community, you can visit lifeinenglish.net/vip.

[00:00:42] There's a really common misconception about the idea that moving to another country will help you become fluent in a language. And although I think it definitely can help, you know, because when you're in a foreign country and nobody speaks your language, if you don't learn to communicate, you probably will have a hard time surviving. So the fact that you're forced to use the language and communicate is positive because you have.. you really have no choice at that point, and you're naturally going to start to learn common words and phrases and how to survive in basic situations like at the post office, the restaurant, bars, on the bus and things like that. The basic stuff, of course, you're going to learn.

[00:01:24] But what I think a lot of people don't understand is that moving to a foreign country to learn the language isn't, like, the most effective solution to your problem. And when I say problem, I mean, you don't speak this language that you want to learn how to speak. You don't know how to communicate effectively yet. That's the problem or the situation, let's say. And you think, you know, "There's no way I could do it from my home. So the only way I can become fluent in English is if I move to an English-speaking country and I stay there for three or six or twelve months. That's the only way.

[00:02:01] And although, like I said, it will have a positive effect on your English speaking skills and your understanding of the language and culture and things like that... When you stop and think about how much money that's going to cost you. I'm not sure it's the best solution. You know what I mean? I'm not sure it's the best option. And I'll tell you why. You have access to the internet, which means you have access to the world and all the people in it, or at least all the people with social media accounts and websites and emails and things like that, which is most people that have electronic devices, let's say. It's millions, billions of people. That's what I'm trying to say.

[00:02:40] And you can talk to these people, most of the time, for free. Right? You have language exchange apps, you have language exchange websites, you have social media, YouTube channels, private conversation groups, and things like that. You have so many options and so many ways to talk to people for free online from the comfort of your home, you could be at the gym, you could be on the bus, you could be walking through the park on the phone with somebody in Japan. For free. For free. You see what I'm saying?

[00:03:14] So again, I've said this multiple times, English courses.. very valuable, very important, very useful. English teachers.. Valuable, important, and useful. Traveling to the foreign country, a priceless experience. If you can do it, do it. Don't think twice about it. So now that we got that out the way, I'm just saying, is it the best option for you right now? Do you really believe the only way you can learn a language is by moving to the country? Because in your mind, then “Oh, I'll be forced to use the language, so then I'll be forced to learn."

[00:03:48] I don't think so, because what you've got to understand is most people in my experience, most people come to this country or go to some other foreign country with that idea in their minds, which is "I'll be forced to use the language." Excuse me, "I'll be forced to use the language so then I'll learn." And then they go and they sit in their hotel all day, or they go and just walk around the city looking at buildings. And, you know, then they go into restaurants and ask for food. They go on the bus and say hello to the bus driver, and that's it.

[00:04:17] They're not making any friends. They're not communicating with people. They're not going out to bars or clubs or places where they can find other people to interact with. They're not doing any of that. They sit inside their little shell, kind of just watching everything happen and then they come back home and say, "Oh, I've been to that place. Yeah, I've been there. I've been to the U.S. 15 times and I still don't speak English."

[00:04:40] It's like... So what I'm trying to say is with that example, what I'm trying to say is clearly just going to that place isn't the only thing you need, because if you're afraid to talk to people right now online in the comfort of your own home, what makes you think you're going to just miraculously turn into this social butterfly when you go to the foreign country and nobody even speaks your language? What makes you think that is just going to solve all your problems? Spending hundreds or thousands of dollars on plane tickets, accommodation, visas, taxes, currency exchange rates, all of that just to learn the foreign language. There's a better option, bro. It's called a language exchange or a private language teacher or something like that. You know what I'm saying?

[00:05:28] What I think you have to figure out first, what I think you have to do first is just get comfortable talking to people. And the easiest, most cost-effective way to do that. It's just finding a language exchange partner. Like, I learned how to speak Spanish before I went to Mexico. I learned how to speak Portuguese before I went to Brazil, without leaving my house, for free. You see what I'm saying? And I'm not like some special genius or something like that, anybody can do it, I know many other people that have done it, you know, before they ever went to the country. Just like I know a bunch of people that simply went to the foreign country thinking, "OK, this is going to make me fluent. I just need to live there. That's the only way."

[00:06:11] And they come back and you ask them about their experience. "What did you do? Did you make any friends? Did you improve your English?"

[00:06:17] "No, not really. It's hard to make friends, and I didn't know where to go or what to do, so I kind of just walked around and stayed to myself, or I found other people that speak my language and I talk to them all the time."

[00:06:30] That's what most people do. There are people that live or have lived in the U.S. for decades and still don't speak English. Happens all the time. So simply going to that place where they speak the language increases the chance that you will find people that speak that language, but you still have to approach them and talk to them. And if you can't do that, what are you going to do? How are you going to learn and improve and become fluent just because you're there? You see what I'm saying?

[00:07:00] So the point I'm trying to make is, yeah, moving to the foreign country increases the chances that you become fluent, of course. But if you're not going to be actively putting yourself in situations Where you have to use the language, interact with the language, immerse yourself in the culture. What's the point in spending all that money to go to that country? You could sit at home on your couch, on your phone, or your computer and talk to hundreds of people from that country for free and become fluent in the language.

[00:07:34] So this idea that "You just have to go to the country, that's the only way you'll be fluent." I say bullshit. It's bullshit. Just learn how to talk to people, learn how to have conversations, learn how to be interested in other people, and you'll always have somebody to talk to, which means you'll always have opportunities to improve your language and communication skills. You don't need to travel halfway around the world to do that. Most likely, you're just going to waste money in time traveling halfway around the world to do that. Because if you can't, you know, step outside your comfort zone and approach somebody online for free with very little risk or without even really having to feel hard rejection, what makes you think you'll be able to do it in person in that country halfway across the world? You know? Just something to think about.

[00:08:25] You have so many tools. So much technology at your disposal. Most of it is free. Why not use it so that when you finally get the chance to go to the country, you're not thinking about becoming fluent in the language, you’re just thinking about enjoying the experience? Using the language like the tool that is to communicate with the people to get what you want to go, where you want to go, to meet who you want to meet, to create those memorable experiences. You know what I'm saying?

[00:08:51] This is just the way I think about it. Obviously, you could disagree. You might have a different philosophy, but it's just weird that you hear all the time, people think "When I finally," it's like this destination addiction that people have. "When I finally get the chance to go to that place, then I'll practice my English and then I'll become fluent because it's an obligation at that point."

[00:09:09] But if you can't obligate yourself to do it at home, when nobody's forcing you to do it, what makes you think you'll do it when you go to that country? You're just going to do what you always do, which is just enough to get by, just enough to survive. So it's about your mindset. You have to create the immersive environment where.. Wherever you are right now. Not wait until this, you know, imaginary moment in time when you'll be forced to do it. That doesn't make sense, you know, and that's the concept of Life in English. Because I learned, after learning Spanish and Portuguese from my home, that if you just live your life in that language now you'll learn that language now. You see what I'm saying?

[00:09:55] I don't know, like, my experiences in Mexico and Brazil would have been completely different if I had waited to start learning the language until after I arrived in those countries. I would not have had half of the amazing experiences I had. If I hadn't chosen to start learning the languages months and in some cases years before I went to the country. You know?

[00:10:20] So anyway, man, like I said, it's just something to think about. You don't need to travel to some foreign country to learn the language. You have the internet, it's fucking free. There are hundreds of teachers online offering courses for reasonable prices that will teach you what you really need to know. There are tens, maybe even hundreds of platforms where you can find people to talk to for free.

[00:10:43] You know, so it's not about what situation you need to be in to become fluent or what location you need to be in to become fluent. It's about what you are going to have the discipline to make yourself do on a regular basis, consistently, day in and day out. The effort that you're going to put into it determines what the result is going to be. You shouldn't be waiting for some external force to obligate you to do something that not only you want to do, but you know you need to do. You know? You need to do that now.

[00:11:16] So if finding a private teacher or a language exchange partner is not your number one priority at the moment, it just tells me you're not really serious about learning how to communicate in English. We might disagree on that, but again, it's just my opinion. It just tells me you're not serious. Because we've already established that's the best way to improve. Everybody watches videos, listens to podcasts, reads books and news articles, and is on social media consuming content in English. But how many people are talking to another human being on a regular basis? Not very many. Not very many... Which is why not very many people, relatively not very many people reach this high level of English fluency that everybody says they want. You know?

[00:12:05] So if this is the first time you've ever heard somebody say this, or maybe you've heard it before and you never took it seriously, you know, hopefully, you can get what I'm trying to say, And you'll at least consider what I'm saying. Moving to another country isn't the key to becoming fluent. Living your life in that language is the key to becoming fluent, and you can do that from anywhere in the world. Anywhere. Stop making excuses and just do what you know you need to do. In my opinion, it's that simple. So... There you go.

[00:12:41] This is Life in English. I'm your host, Tony Kaizen, and I'll talk to you later. Peace.

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Transcript

[00:00:00] What's up, everybody? You're listening to another episode of Life in English. I'm your host, Tony Kaizen. And in this episode, I want to talk about the common question, "Will moving to another country help me become fluent?"

[00:00:19] The Life and English Podcast is designed to teach you the real American English that you won't learn in school. And it's made possible by our VIP community by becoming a VIP member of the Life in English Community, you'll get access to our Private Conversation Group, bonus podcast episodes, interactive transcripts, and vocabulary and grammar guides. If you'd like to join the community, you can visit lifeinenglish.net/vip.

[00:00:42] There's a really common misconception about the idea that moving to another country will help you become fluent in a language. And although I think it definitely can help, you know, because when you're in a foreign country and nobody speaks your language, if you don't learn to communicate, you probably will have a hard time surviving. So the fact that you're forced to use the language and communicate is positive because you have.. you really have no choice at that point, and you're naturally going to start to learn common words and phrases and how to survive in basic situations like at the post office, the restaurant, bars, on the bus and things like that. The basic stuff, of course, you're going to learn.

[00:01:24] But what I think a lot of people don't understand is that moving to a foreign country to learn the language isn't, like, the most effective solution to your problem. And when I say problem, I mean, you don't speak this language that you want to learn how to speak. You don't know how to communicate effectively yet. That's the problem or the situation, let's say. And you think, you know, "There's no way I could do it from my home. So the only way I can become fluent in English is if I move to an English-speaking country and I stay there for three or six or twelve months. That's the only way.

[00:02:01] And although, like I said, it will have a positive effect on your English speaking skills and your understanding of the language and culture and things like that... When you stop and think about how much money that's going to cost you. I'm not sure it's the best solution. You know what I mean? I'm not sure it's the best option. And I'll tell you why. You have access to the internet, which means you have access to the world and all the people in it, or at least all the people with social media accounts and websites and emails and things like that, which is most people that have electronic devices, let's say. It's millions, billions of people. That's what I'm trying to say.

[00:02:40] And you can talk to these people, most of the time, for free. Right? You have language exchange apps, you have language exchange websites, you have social media, YouTube channels, private conversation groups, and things like that. You have so many options and so many ways to talk to people for free online from the comfort of your home, you could be at the gym, you could be on the bus, you could be walking through the park on the phone with somebody in Japan. For free. For free. You see what I'm saying?

[00:03:14] So again, I've said this multiple times, English courses.. very valuable, very important, very useful. English teachers.. Valuable, important, and useful. Traveling to the foreign country, a priceless experience. If you can do it, do it. Don't think twice about it. So now that we got that out the way, I'm just saying, is it the best option for you right now? Do you really believe the only way you can learn a language is by moving to the country? Because in your mind, then “Oh, I'll be forced to use the language, so then I'll be forced to learn."

[00:03:48] I don't think so, because what you've got to understand is most people in my experience, most people come to this country or go to some other foreign country with that idea in their minds, which is "I'll be forced to use the language." Excuse me, "I'll be forced to use the language so then I'll learn." And then they go and they sit in their hotel all day, or they go and just walk around the city looking at buildings. And, you know, then they go into restaurants and ask for food. They go on the bus and say hello to the bus driver, and that's it.

[00:04:17] They're not making any friends. They're not communicating with people. They're not going out to bars or clubs or places where they can find other people to interact with. They're not doing any of that. They sit inside their little shell, kind of just watching everything happen and then they come back home and say, "Oh, I've been to that place. Yeah, I've been there. I've been to the U.S. 15 times and I still don't speak English."

[00:04:40] It's like... So what I'm trying to say is with that example, what I'm trying to say is clearly just going to that place isn't the only thing you need, because if you're afraid to talk to people right now online in the comfort of your own home, what makes you think you're going to just miraculously turn into this social butterfly when you go to the foreign country and nobody even speaks your language? What makes you think that is just going to solve all your problems? Spending hundreds or thousands of dollars on plane tickets, accommodation, visas, taxes, currency exchange rates, all of that just to learn the foreign language. There's a better option, bro. It's called a language exchange or a private language teacher or something like that. You know what I'm saying?

[00:05:28] What I think you have to figure out first, what I think you have to do first is just get comfortable talking to people. And the easiest, most cost-effective way to do that. It's just finding a language exchange partner. Like, I learned how to speak Spanish before I went to Mexico. I learned how to speak Portuguese before I went to Brazil, without leaving my house, for free. You see what I'm saying? And I'm not like some special genius or something like that, anybody can do it, I know many other people that have done it, you know, before they ever went to the country. Just like I know a bunch of people that simply went to the foreign country thinking, "OK, this is going to make me fluent. I just need to live there. That's the only way."

[00:06:11] And they come back and you ask them about their experience. "What did you do? Did you make any friends? Did you improve your English?"

[00:06:17] "No, not really. It's hard to make friends, and I didn't know where to go or what to do, so I kind of just walked around and stayed to myself, or I found other people that speak my language and I talk to them all the time."

[00:06:30] That's what most people do. There are people that live or have lived in the U.S. for decades and still don't speak English. Happens all the time. So simply going to that place where they speak the language increases the chance that you will find people that speak that language, but you still have to approach them and talk to them. And if you can't do that, what are you going to do? How are you going to learn and improve and become fluent just because you're there? You see what I'm saying?

[00:07:00] So the point I'm trying to make is, yeah, moving to the foreign country increases the chances that you become fluent, of course. But if you're not going to be actively putting yourself in situations Where you have to use the language, interact with the language, immerse yourself in the culture. What's the point in spending all that money to go to that country? You could sit at home on your couch, on your phone, or your computer and talk to hundreds of people from that country for free and become fluent in the language.

[00:07:34] So this idea that "You just have to go to the country, that's the only way you'll be fluent." I say bullshit. It's bullshit. Just learn how to talk to people, learn how to have conversations, learn how to be interested in other people, and you'll always have somebody to talk to, which means you'll always have opportunities to improve your language and communication skills. You don't need to travel halfway around the world to do that. Most likely, you're just going to waste money in time traveling halfway around the world to do that. Because if you can't, you know, step outside your comfort zone and approach somebody online for free with very little risk or without even really having to feel hard rejection, what makes you think you'll be able to do it in person in that country halfway across the world? You know? Just something to think about.

[00:08:25] You have so many tools. So much technology at your disposal. Most of it is free. Why not use it so that when you finally get the chance to go to the country, you're not thinking about becoming fluent in the language, you’re just thinking about enjoying the experience? Using the language like the tool that is to communicate with the people to get what you want to go, where you want to go, to meet who you want to meet, to create those memorable experiences. You know what I'm saying?

[00:08:51] This is just the way I think about it. Obviously, you could disagree. You might have a different philosophy, but it's just weird that you hear all the time, people think "When I finally," it's like this destination addiction that people have. "When I finally get the chance to go to that place, then I'll practice my English and then I'll become fluent because it's an obligation at that point."

[00:09:09] But if you can't obligate yourself to do it at home, when nobody's forcing you to do it, what makes you think you'll do it when you go to that country? You're just going to do what you always do, which is just enough to get by, just enough to survive. So it's about your mindset. You have to create the immersive environment where.. Wherever you are right now. Not wait until this, you know, imaginary moment in time when you'll be forced to do it. That doesn't make sense, you know, and that's the concept of Life in English. Because I learned, after learning Spanish and Portuguese from my home, that if you just live your life in that language now you'll learn that language now. You see what I'm saying?

[00:09:55] I don't know, like, my experiences in Mexico and Brazil would have been completely different if I had waited to start learning the language until after I arrived in those countries. I would not have had half of the amazing experiences I had. If I hadn't chosen to start learning the languages months and in some cases years before I went to the country. You know?

[00:10:20] So anyway, man, like I said, it's just something to think about. You don't need to travel to some foreign country to learn the language. You have the internet, it's fucking free. There are hundreds of teachers online offering courses for reasonable prices that will teach you what you really need to know. There are tens, maybe even hundreds of platforms where you can find people to talk to for free.

[00:10:43] You know, so it's not about what situation you need to be in to become fluent or what location you need to be in to become fluent. It's about what you are going to have the discipline to make yourself do on a regular basis, consistently, day in and day out. The effort that you're going to put into it determines what the result is going to be. You shouldn't be waiting for some external force to obligate you to do something that not only you want to do, but you know you need to do. You know? You need to do that now.

[00:11:16] So if finding a private teacher or a language exchange partner is not your number one priority at the moment, it just tells me you're not really serious about learning how to communicate in English. We might disagree on that, but again, it's just my opinion. It just tells me you're not serious. Because we've already established that's the best way to improve. Everybody watches videos, listens to podcasts, reads books and news articles, and is on social media consuming content in English. But how many people are talking to another human being on a regular basis? Not very many. Not very many... Which is why not very many people, relatively not very many people reach this high level of English fluency that everybody says they want. You know?

[00:12:05] So if this is the first time you've ever heard somebody say this, or maybe you've heard it before and you never took it seriously, you know, hopefully, you can get what I'm trying to say, And you'll at least consider what I'm saying. Moving to another country isn't the key to becoming fluent. Living your life in that language is the key to becoming fluent, and you can do that from anywhere in the world. Anywhere. Stop making excuses and just do what you know you need to do. In my opinion, it's that simple. So... There you go.

[00:12:41] This is Life in English. I'm your host, Tony Kaizen, and I'll talk to you later. Peace.

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