#120 - Talking About Nothing 4

December 15, 2021

You know the deal... It's another ramble fest.

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[00:00:01] Life in English live stream. Talking about nothing, number 4.

[00:00:06] Here we go.

[00:00:12] Put it right about there, okay. Welcome to the live, y'all. We're just doing a live stream. I'm not talking about anything in particular. So feel free to ask all your questions, leave your comments. I'ma just be talking about some random stuff. This is really more like advanced listening practice in a chance for you to get your questions answered. Stuff like that.

[00:00:30] So we're just going to chill and hang out for probably an hour. I'm not going to do two and a half hours like I did last week, but I'll probably be here at least an hour. So leave your comments, man. I'm going to try to get to all of them. All right, give me a second. I'm trying to read the comments, y'all.

[00:00:48] Can you please explain the difference between than and then?

[00:00:56] The difference between than and then. So than is T H A N. Then is T H E N. Right? So 'than' is the word that we use to compare quantities, right? For example, "I have more than you" or "you have more than me" or "we have less than them" or "they have less than us". That's T H A N. That's the way that we use that word. So whenever we're comparing the quantities of two things or the possession of two things, stuff like that, we're going to use the word 'than'. More than or less than or equal to. Right?

[00:01:35] Now, then T H E N. I think it depends on the context, actually. But 'then' is typically a word that we use to describe what's going to happen next. For example, "I'm going to the store and then I'm going home". Right? So I'm going to the store and after that or and then, which is basically the same thing, this next thing is going to happen. So that's typically the way we use the word then. But we also use the word then T H E N, in a way that's like... you know how when somebody tells you something, sometimes you respond in a way that's basically saying, "well, if this is the case, this other thing is also the case".

[00:02:20] That probably doesn't make sense the way I said it, so let me give you an example. Let's imagine you're talking to your friend, and he says, "if we don't go to the beach, then I don't want to go anywhere". That's one way of using the word then, like the way I just explained. But then you can respond by saying, "then let's go to the beach". So in that case, when I start the sentence with 'then' I'm saying, "well, if that's the case, this other thing is going to be the case". You know?

[00:02:50] I don't know, I can't remember the grammatical term for the word. I don't think it's conjunction. But let me know if that makes any sense. That's the difference to me between the two words and how we use them. If I had more time to think about it, I could probably explain it to you better, but there you go.

[00:03:06] Difference between could have and should have.

[00:03:10] That's a good question. So what's your name, bro? I am a stranger60. Whatever your name is, stranger. The difference between could have and should have. "Could have" is what we say, simply to express the fact that you had an opportunity in the past and you had an opportunity to take advantage of a situation or whatever it is. So you're just expressing the fact that there was a possibility that something happened or could have happened. I'm trying to explain it without using the words could have.

[00:03:46] Now, "should have" is what we say when we want to express the fact that we believe that the right thing to do was this thing. Like, for example... It's probably better if I explain with an example. Ah okay, so let's just say going to the movies, for example. We're talking about going out to the movies and we don't go. And the next day I say, "man, we could have gone to the movies". So all I'm expressing is that there was the possibility that we went to the movies. We were capable of doing it. We had the opportunity so we could have gone. Right? But if I say, "man, we should have gone to the movies". What I'm expressing is that I think the right thing to do would have been to go to the movies. That would have been the best choice, the best way to spend our night, the best decision to make.

[00:04:37] Because when you say "should", if you're saying something should be, you're expressing the idea that you think that's the right thing. You think that's the way it should be. Like when you tell somebody, "you should be a teacher". You're saying, "I recognize your talent, and I think the right thing for you to do is to be a teacher. That's what you should do". If I say you could be a teacher, it's like, "well, you have the ability and it's possible there's nothing stopping you". So it's the same thing as should have and could have. We're just referring to something in the past. Let me know if that makes sense. I don't know if I explained that clearly, but let me know.

[00:05:12] Hi, can you explain "have got" and when we need to use it? Please.

[00:05:18] Lom1008 I think is your name or your screen name. So have got... I mean, off the top of my head trying to explain like, what it is when I hear "have got" it just means "I have". It's just another way of saying I have. For example, "I have three kids" or "I have got three kids". Now, we typically don't say have got in informal speech. We'd say "I've got", which is a contracted version of I have got. So I'd say, "I have three kids" or "I've got three kids". And to me it's the same thing. But "I've got" is just more informal, you know?

[00:06:05] But it's really, really common, at least here in the States to hear people say I've got. Or for example, like "gotta". The contraction "gotta" a lot of people think, you know, got to, for example. I've gotta go to the store. But really the complete phrase is "I have got to go to the store". But we say "I've got to go to the store". You know, so we're just saying I have to go to the store. It's just another way of saying it. You know? So I don't know if that makes sense, but to simplify it, it's the same thing as saying "I have", it's just less formal. You know? At least the way I think about it off the top of my head. That's the answer.

[00:06:47] How's your Spanish?

[00:06:50] On a scale of one to ten? Honestly, five. Yeah, five. Six on a good day, but five. People tell me that it's higher than that, but I think they're just being nice. I'm pretty self-aware and I hear myself speaking Spanish, trying to express myself and I would say, from zero to ten it's probably a five. Which technically is an F for fucking sucks. Let me go back to these comments, I know there's a lot.

[00:07:24] What is facts?

[00:07:28] What is facts? Oh, okay, that's a good question. So facts is kind of like, um, I guess you could call it slang. It's just a word that we say when somebody is speaking the truth because... And you spelled it F A X, which is like an electronic device, something completely different. But facts F A C T S, facts. When somebody says that it means they're saying like, what you're saying is true and I agree. Like, that's real shit, like real talk, facts. Because you're not lying. If you're speaking facts, if what you're saying is a fact, then it's not a lie. It's not false. So that's why people say that. Like I might say, "Messi is the greatest player of all time" and you might say, "facts". And you're saying that's a fact, that's true. Right? That's not false. So that's what facts means.

[00:08:22] How do you be good at English? Practice English.

[00:08:33] Can you stop worrying about...? Oh, damn, I can't read today. How can I stop worrying about my English when I start talking to native speakers on social media?

[00:08:47] How? I don't know if this answer is going to be helpful to you, but this is just what I would do if I were you. This is what I've done. I think the subject of like learning how to be more calm or confident or secure, sure of yourself, whatever it is, especially when in public or especially when interacting with other people.

[00:09:18] Like, you know, a lot of people have a bunch of different techniques and recommendations, but what worked for me, man, is just making the simple choice to not care. Like, it's a choice that you can make. You know? You obviously can't control the thoughts that enter your mind involuntarily. Right? But you can choose to entertain them or not. And when I say entertain I mean like, give them your time, attention, and consideration. Right? Acknowledge them. You don't have to. So in a moment where you're like, feeling insecure or afraid or you're hearing these negative thoughts, you don't have to pay attention to that stuff. I know that sounds like maybe an oversimplification. Like maybe it doesn't even make sense.

[00:09:56] What I'm trying to say is like, you can choose to just not care. You can choose that. So how do you stop caring? Just fucking decide, like, I don't care. I wish I had like, a more detailed, like beautiful answer or something like that. But it really is just a conscious choice that you make to care or not care about something. So if you just, if you know that you can speak English, you can communicate, you can understand when people talk to you. Like, just say what you got to say. You know? I think you just have to stop worrying about what the consequences are going to be. That probably doesn't sound good. But what I mean is a lot of times people are nervous because they're anticipating a negative outcome. They're anticipating like, disaster. They're imagining the worst-case scenario a lot of times, and that makes them scared.

[00:10:46] So if you just choose to focus on the present moment and just communicate, or if you choose to think positive thoughts or choose to just not care at all what happens, especially when you know you have good intentions. I mean, what more can you do? That's just works for me. I don't know what to tell you, is hard to tell you how you should do something because I'm not you, you know, but that's what I did. It works for me.

[00:11:16] Somebody wants me to do a quick pronunciation exercise. So the words CAP, CUP and COP. Before I say them, I want you to think to yourself, how do you pronounce these words? C A P. How would you pronounce that? Obviously, I can't hear you, but I want you to say it out loud. I don't care if you're on the bus, I don't care if you're in the kitchen, I don't care what you're doing right now. Say it out loud. CAP. How do you pronounce that? I would pronounce it, cap. Cap is cap. Like, "no cap, bro" "stop capping, nigga.. fuck you mean". That's cap. Right? Cap, and cap. All right? So C A P is cap. Hopefully, you got that one right.

[00:12:03] Now, the next one is what? C U P, CUP. How would you pronounce that word? Again, say it out loud. One more time. C U P. How do you pronounce it? I would say, cup. So instead of "ah" like cap, we say "oh", like cup or fuck or stuck or truck or bus or but or what. Cup. Right? So CAP, Cap. CUP, cup. The last one, C O P. How would you pronounce that word? COP. I would say, cop. Cop, you know?

[00:12:53] So CAP, cap. CUP, cup. COP, cop. I block and stop and watch and pop and rock, shock, cop. Okay? So ah, uh, oh. Those are the three sounds. Hopefully that helps.

[00:13:14] Why do you know Spanish?

[00:13:17] Because some of my good friends in college were Mexican, and they were always speaking Spanish, and I got tired of being the only fucking guy in the room that couldn't understand. So I asked him to teach me Spanish one day and the rest was kind of, you know, history, as they say.

[00:13:35] Do you think that it's hard to learn Spanish?

[00:13:39] Honestly, I don't. I really don't. I think Spanish is a very simple language, and if you speak English, it's definitely the first foreign language that you should learn. Yeah, I think it's one of the... I'm not going to say it's one of the easiest languages to learn because I have no idea about the difficulty of, you know, all the languages.

[00:14:00] But, and maybe I'm just, you know, naturally like predisposed to learn languages. Maybe it would be extremely hard for other English speakers, I don't know. But in my experience, Spanish was not easy to learn. But it's a simple language, you know, so if you just practice and study, then it's not difficult because it follows very clear and consistent patterns in terms of pronunciation, verb conjugation, grammar, and things like that.

[00:14:31] The grammar was a challenge at first, for sure. You just have to get used to it. And my grammar still is not that good today, but I can make myself understood and people tell me that my grammar is okay, so. So we're talking about like, standard textbook, correct Spanish, then maybe it's difficult. I don't know because I don't know that type of Spanish, but the spoken language in general to me is not difficult. The difficulty of Spanish is understanding Spanish speakers because you talk so fucking fast. You know what I mean? Especially from certain countries. Just talk so fast. And not only that but like, different countries have different words for the same objects or feelings or situations. You know what I mean?

[00:15:12] Like, I think it was maybe it feels like a month ago, I learned the word vaina, which I guess is heavily used in the Dominican Republic. Which can be anything. The word vaina can be anything. Stuff like that. I've been speaking Spanish five years. I had never heard that word before because I never really talked to anybody from the Dominican, you know? But anyway, I said all that to say, I don't think it's too difficult. I just think the challenge is understanding all Spanish speakers from all over the world. Because Spanish is Spanish, but at the same time it definitely changes from region to region. Right? Just like any other language, I imagine, so...

[00:15:56] Turn this live in Spanish. Nope! Can't do it. Life in English.

[00:16:02] Have you done the IELTS test?

[00:16:04] No, I have not. Isn't the IELTS for people trying to prove that they can speak English? I think, I don't think English teachers take the IELTS. To be honest, I don't know. But I don't think they do. But no, I've never taken that test. I've never taken any exam to test my English level other than in public school, obviously.

[00:16:24] And there was one class that like, I fucking hated school in general, but that was one class that I just naturally did good in. Like I remember in multiple years during my schooling, my teachers, my literature teachers telling me like, that I was doing really good in the class. Like, I was a good writer and I could like, formulate and express my ideas really well. You know? That was something that came natural, but everything else certainly did not.

[00:16:48] Like, I'm terrible at math, you know. I don't even, I'm not even sure I could do like, eighth-grade level math right now. And I find myself constantly trying to do simple multiplication equations, division, and stuff like that just with money and other things and time and stuff. And can't do it. You know? You didn't ask me about that. So let me get back to these questions.

[00:17:13] What's the best way to learn English?

[00:17:19] The answer to that question is subjective because everybody's different, right? Some people prefer to learn things by doing things, like me. I like to learn by experience, I like to put my hands on it, take it apart, put it together, and play with it to see how it works. Figuratively and literally. Right? But some people like, need to watch a video of it being done, and then immediately they can just go do it. Other people if you just talk to them and they just hear and they can learn that way. Other people need to read their instructions or their lesson or whatever it is. So everybody's different. Some people will prefer to listen to podcasts, other people will prefer TV series, some people prefer music or the news or talking to real people. You know?

[00:18:04] So what's the best way? I don't know if there is one best way. I would say the most effective thing you can be doing, though, is talking to real people. You know? Everybody does all that other stuff. Podcasts, movies, books, series, music, etc. But the most effective way to improve your listening and speaking skills is listening and talking to a human being. So if I had to choose, I would say that's the best way.

[00:18:32] Will ever I be fluent in English like you? What is my hope there?

[00:18:44] Will you ever be fluent in English like me? I don't know what you mean by that. So I can't really answer that part of your question. But I mean, I understand that you're asking, will you ever get to a high level of English. Like native level? I mean, it's my first language, bro. So I don't know if you're saying, will you ever speak it as if you were born speaking it? I don't know. I mean, it's definitely possible. People do it all the time. I've never done it.

[00:19:10] So, and to be honest, I don't know if that should be your focus. I don't think your goal when learning to speak a foreign language should be speaking it as if you have been speaking it since you were born. I don't think the goal should be to speak it exactly like you speak your first language. I mean, that's such a difficult thing to achieve. You know what I mean? So it's like if you're always... I mean, I guess if you want to shoot for the stars or whatever, then yeah, that's cool. But a lot of times you might just be setting yourself up or, in other words, preparing yourself for disappointment. You know? Because you're never or it's going to take so long to reach that goal, generally speaking, for most people, that you might start to feel demotivated. Like, "man, it's never going to be perfect". And then you start to lose hope.

[00:19:58] So I think a much more realistic, attainable goal is to be conversational. To be able to sit down with almost anybody and have a conversation. Or go to almost any English-speaking country and be able to survive and communicate. That should be the goal. Because once you get to that place, you can talk to anybody and then everything that comes after that, it's just like a bonus. It's extra. You never stop learning new words, expressions or getting exposed to different accents. Not just the language itself but the culture that's influencing that language, you learn about that stuff too. You know?

[00:20:34] So I think you should focus much more on that, man. Not being perfect or speaking just like me, but being conversational. Because if you're conversational, that means that you have mastered the fundamentals, which is always the most important part of anything that you're doing. So master the fundamentals and then just kind of build on top of that, understanding that it's going to take time. But the more effort you put in, the better the results you get out. So it's really up to you. So is there any hope? I don't know. You tell me. You know, another question I have, bro.

[00:21:05] And I was thinking, like before I started recording is when I was thinking about Christmas is around the corner as well as my birthday is next month and stuff like that, and I was thinking about why do people celebrate? Why do people exchange gifts on Christmas and stuff? And after hearing myself speak, just in case you don't understand, when I say Christmas is around the corner, that's an expression that means like, it's very close. It's going to happen very soon.

[00:21:30] So I was thinking about all that and birthdays and stuff, and it made me ask myself like, why do people fear getting older? Have you ever asked yourself that question? Like, why do people... Why are they so afraid of getting older? And you see it all around the world and I think with men and women. You know? People who are like afraid of getting wrinkles in their face or their body not functioning like it once did. All that type of stuff, getting sick, dying, and things like that. Not looking as physically attractive as you did when you were 21 or 30 or whatever.

[00:22:06] Why do you think people are so afraid of getting old? And do you think it's just the physical aspect of getting old that people are uncomfortable with? Because when you think about the emotional or the, let's say, intellectual for lack of a better word, the spiritual aspects of getting older like, it's a net positive, in my opinion. Hopefully, as you get older you get wiser. Like, you have more life experiences and you're learning from those experiences and you're applying that newfound knowledge to, you know, your future or the next experiences, however you say it. And you're learning and you're getting better. You're constantly becoming a better, smarter, more evolved, and optimized version of yourself as you get older.

[00:22:53] Because when you're young, bro, you're fucking 14, 18, 21. I mean, even 25 or 30, in some cases. It's like, you don't know shit bro, you're dumb as hell. Don't really have the experience that you need to be the person that you should be. So and maybe that doesn't make sense. But what I'm saying is like typically, generally speaking, the younger the people are like, the less experienced they are. Which means the less wise they are, which means the less than optimal choices they make. You know what I'm saying?

[00:23:25] So I think getting older like you get wiser, you get smarter and you learn how to live better in a way that's better for you. You learn how to be yourself, or more of yourself. You know what I mean? Getting older is the shit. Obviously, it comes with responsibility, but you know, that's just life. So being like young and dumb is fun, I guess. But I think being old and smart is pretty fucking cool, too. What do you guys think?

[00:23:54] It's fun. Like, when we are kids we want to be grown. And when we get old, people want to go back.

[00:24:00] Yeah, absolutely, man. It's like the classic experience for a lot of people when we're young, we want to be grown and have independence and just do what we want and, you know, all that type of stuff. Because we don't really know, most of the time nobody explains to us that what we imagine as life as an adult is just a small piece of the entire pie. You know? It comes with a lot more responsibility and freedom, which also comes with responsibility. Like, we imagine the freedom that adults have, but we don't understand that you cannot separate freedom from responsibility. You know?

[00:24:36] So I think that's why as kids, we want so badly to be adults. And then as adults like, I don't necessarily I want to be a kid anymore. It's not like I want to go back to my childhood. Yeah, to be honest, I don't think I would if I had the chance, if I could just go back to being the kid, I don't even think I would. I would prefer to like, learn how to take the best aspects of what it meant to be a kid and integrate them into my adult life. I would prefer to do that. You know? But you're right, a lot of people do feel that way. I don't know. I just don't understand why people fear getting older. I don't know if it's the fear of losing your physical attractiveness, I don't know if it's the fear of death itself. If it's the fear of sickness or what exactly. I don't know.

[00:25:33] Which makes me think of a really, really interesting idea that a friend of mine told me a couple of years ago when we were talking about life after death and reincarnation and things like that. And what she believes is that reincarnation is real, but it's not based on how good or how bad of a person you are during your life. That's not what determines what you will be in the next life. For example, if you're just a saint, an amazing person in the next life, you'll have higher social status, more fortune, more money, or whatever it is. Your life isn't going to be better for that reason. Or if you're just a piece of shit and you're an asshole, you're not going to be born as somebody like anus or something like that. Or you're not going to be poor and broke and miserable in your next life. She doesn't believe that's how it works.

[00:26:21] She believes that reincarnation is based on how many and how well, how many lessons and how well you learned them during your life. So how many life lessons you can manage to learn doing your life. Because during your entire lifetime life is throwing these situations at you and you have a chance to learn something from every experience, right? So she believes based on how you learn your life lessons or if you learn them, that will determine the quality of your next life.

[00:26:52] So if you go through life learning the lessons that you're supposed to learn, you're paying attention, you're trying to evolve and grow. Your next life will not be better. It will be easier to accomplish the things that you want to accomplish because you learned the lessons that you needed to learn in your past life, which sets you up for the next one.

[00:27:08] Now, if you go through life just refusing to learn, the lessons that life or God or the universe or whatever, however you see it, whatever you want to call it. Let's just call it life. If you refuse to learn those lessons like, your next life is going to be even harder because you refused to learn the things that you needed to learn before you went on to your next life. And then it just creates this positive or negative feedback loop. And that's how she thinks reincarnation works.

[00:27:34] And ever since she shared that idea with me, like, I've never stopped thinking about it. And I think I became, like, more attentive to that idea and like trying to put more attention on whether or not I'm learning the lessons I'm supposed to be learning from the experiences that I'm having. You know? It's an interesting idea. What do you guys think? Do you guys believe in reincarnation? Life after death? What do you guys think?

[00:28:04] Bro, you're 26 years old, you're already worried about being an adult?

[00:28:14] I don't understand the question, actually. It's a good question. Or it's a curious question, but I don't really understand what you mean. Like, 26 is too young to be thinking about my adult life? I completely disagree. I completely disagree. And maybe I'm, I guess I understand what you're trying to say, which is like, "Man, enjoy your life, you're young. You don't have to worry about this, that and the third". And I never said that I was worried about being an adult, first of all. So I don't know when you heard that because I never said that. But second of all, I guess what you're trying to say is like, "Enjoy your life while you're young. 26 is young". I totally agree, but that doesn't mean that you can't be thinking about your adult life. Like, where you want your life to go, if you don't think about it, then what the fuck are you going to do? You're just going to let life happen to you? I don't know. I just, I see things differently. Obviously, we might have a difference of opinion, but I just see it differently.

[00:29:13] I think we don't get taught to think about our adult lives early enough. Or we get taught to think about the wrong aspects of our adult life or we get taught to think about it in the wrong way, as if it's just responsibility, responsibility, bills go to school, get a job, have a family, raise that family, get sick and die. And that's why I think people are so afraid of it. You know? Either because it's all unknown and they don't know what to do or all they see is misery and bills and taxes and a job that they hate because they can't make a living doing what they want, because everybody told them it was impossible, that type of shit. You know what I'm saying? But you don't have to think about it that way.

[00:29:50] I think if, it depends on how you teach the kid as well. Like, as a child, you can teach them about tax laws and philosophy and human psychology, you just have to break it down into little pieces that they can consume and still get the idea. You know? So you can teach kids to think about their life as an adult, what they want to do with their lives without making it too serious or too heavy, or too dramatic. And give them the tools and the mindset and way of thinking that they need so that when they finally decide or find out what they want to do with their adult life, they have the mental capacity and resources to get it done as opposed to just being young and dumb and having fun until you're 35 and then saying, "okay, let me get serious about life". I'm sure that works for somebody, but it doesn't work for me, you know. So I guess it's just two different ways of seeing it. And again, I didn't understand your question and I responded anyway. So forgive me if I took it out of context or misunderstood it, but that's what I think.

[00:30:49] Could you explain different ways to say "I like you"?

[00:30:57] That's a good question. Different ways to say "I like you". I've never thought about that. I mean, I guess like, if I were to say it, depending on where I was, obviously, but like where I grew up, where I went to high school, for example, where I live right now. We would probably say, "I fuck with you". And when I say 'we', I'm talking about like, people that I hang out with or people like me. It's kind of like, when I say "I fuck with you", that's kind of like Ebonics or what some people know as like, "black English" or AAVE. There's different names for it. But that's not like a standard English expression. That's just like how we talk where I'm from or like how a lot of black people talk.

[00:31:44] So if I say I fuck with you, it means not only do I like you, but like, you have my respect, I think you're cool. You know, like we could be friends or we are friends, that type of thing. If I don't fuck with you, it means I don't like you, I don't respect you, I don't want to be near you, I don't want to hang out with you, or nothing like that. So if I do fuck with you, obviously that's the opposite, the positive version of that. So I would say don't use that like at work with somebody you don't know. Do not write that in the email. It's extremely informal. Some people might not even understand it because "to fuck with you" also has a different meaning in a different context. And that's a universal phrase.

[00:32:19] So I'm probably confusing you at this point. But that's one way to say "I like you, I respect you, I think you're cool". I fuck with you. But it's extremely informal, and most people consider it slang, but it's really just a different dialect to English. So something standard, another way to say I like you. I think you're cool. I really don't know another way to say I like you. I would just say, "I like you". Or "you're cool" or something like that. I guess you're cool is a decent way to say I like you. Or I guess you could say it without saying it like, I enjoy your company. I like being around you. I enjoy your presence. I enjoy spending time with you. You're fun to be around or something like that. I mean, I really don't know another way to say I like you, but maybe some of those might be helpful to you. All right.

[00:33:19] Alo Sandoval says, "I guess that's better understand the English, because if you translate just the phrase or something..." Did she write more? Hang on. Maybe she wrote more. "A lot of time you're missing the context if you only translate".

[00:33:42] That's exactly right, and you basically expressed it a hundred times better than I ever could. That's what I was trying to say. I just couldn't find the words. So thank you for that. Because that's really what I was trying to express, is that when you're always translating you're ignoring the fact that context determines the meaning of the phrase. Right? And culture and a lot of times context and culture go hand in hand, but without those things, it's just words. And it can be interpreted in many different ways, depending on the context or culture. So that's exactly right. That's why it's better to just understand it. And it's better just to learn how to learn.

[00:34:20] A lot of times we like, you can't think about language like math or science where 1+1 is 2, sometimes one 1+1 is 17, and it makes perfect sense. When speaking about language. Right? It makes perfect sense. Again, I could say, "I don't fuck with you". Like, literally in the 1+1= 2 way of thinking, it doesn't even make sense. I don't fuck with you. It's like that means I don't have sex with you. Or we don't have sex together with somebody else. It doesn't make literal sense. I don't fuck with you. Because "to fuck", the verb has many meanings. But like to have sex, if I don't fuck with you, it means that we don't fuck together. It doesn't make sense. But in the 1+1 is 17 way of thinking. Right? Which is the way you should be thinking about language, makes perfect sense to me. But to somebody else it doesn't, and that's the point. It's 1+1 is not always 2 when you're thinking about language, which is why just translating all the time is slowing you down. You're not going to become fluent doing that for the rest of your life. You know?

[00:35:28] Can you explain when to use problem and issue?

[00:35:30] Problem and issue are the same exact thing. "Issue" is just a more formal way of saying "problem". So I guess you can use the word issue at work, in emails, and stuff like that. Or if you, you know, I guess, the word "problem" sounds worse, it has a little bit more of a negative connotation than issue. Because the issue is something that can be resolved, there's a solution. A problem is like, "fuck, we've got a problem". Just in terms of the way the words feel to me. I don't know if that makes sense. But they're the same thing. Problem, issue, informal, formal. That's it. So let me take one last look at these questions and comments before I get up out of here.

[00:36:11] *Reading in Spanish*.

[00:36:19] How can you refer... Different ways you can refer to somebody as friend.

[00:36:30] I think it depends on where you're from, what your culture is, and if you're referring to a man or a woman. So I'm going to try to think of some good examples. So I could say if we're talking about a guy my age, I could say, "that's my friend" and that's universal. I can say, "that's my partner" which is, like here in the south we say partner, but it's the word "partner". If I pronounce it that way, you'll probably understand P A R T N E R. But in the South, a lot of people say "partner", it's just a different way of pronouncing the word.

[00:37:09] So if I say, "that's my partner right there", that's my friend. Or I could say "homie" H O M I E, "that's my homie right there". And now partner and homie are considered very informal words. You know? But if you think about the meaning of the word, it just means friend. That's my friend. That's my partner. That's my homie. That's my boy. You know? So again, if you're referring to a guy, "that's my boy right there" that's my friend. You know, we're close. That's my boy. That's my partner. That's my homie. You know what I'm saying? I'm trying to think of some other ones.

[00:37:41] Now this, I'm going to tell you this, but I do not recommend you say this. I just want you to know what it means if I say, "that's my nigga", that also can mean that's my friend, that's my boy, that's my homie. I fuck with him. Going back to that same phrase. I fuck with him. That's my nigga. That's my homie. You know? That's really what it means. So again, I do not recommend you say that. Please, I mean, you say whatever you want, I'm not going to tell you what to say, I don't believe in that type of thing. I'm just saying, the word "nigga" for a lot of people is very, very, very offensive, to black people I mean, it's very offensive if it's being said to them by somebody that's not black.

[00:38:23] Now, this is a very complex and deep subject, so I won't get into it now. I want to stay on topic. But just so, you know, if I say "that's my nigga" I mean that's my friend. And typically I'm talking about a guy, not a girl. I can say "that girl is my nigga". Sometimes we say that, but most of the time it's a guy. Now, words for... I'm trying to think of words that we use for girls. In this case, I would just say friend. I don't know what other girls refer to their girlfriends as. They probably say, "My friend. That's my girl". Just like we say, "that's my boy". They would say that's my girl. Or "my homegirl", I guess some girls might say that. I don't really hear it too often, though. But a lot of girls in my experience, especially like my age range, like 18 to 35, they might say, "that's my girl, that's my friend".

[00:39:09] I can't really think of a bunch of other words that we use for that. Now something much more formal it's like "colleague", which is technically not a friend. But, you know, a colleague is somebody that you interact with on a regular basis, it could be at work or something like that. Most of the time it's at work. A colleague is somebody that you work with. That's not necessarily your friend. Now you could also say "associate", which again, is not a friend. It's kind of like something less than a friend, but I'm just trying to give you more formal words that aren't necessarily "friend". Because a friend is somebody that's close, that you trust, have a good time with, you have fun with them, you just want to spend time with them. Now an associate is somebody with whom you associate. You're not necessarily friends, but you have to do business with this person or interact with this person for whatever reason. So it's an associate. Those are some words that either mean friend or are related to the word friend. Hopefully, that was helpful.

[00:40:07] Okay. HK368 says he or she, I'm not sure, doesn't understand the body count question. So just in case you don't understand or even know what I'm talking about, the body count question obviously is a question about your body count. So, a body count depending on the context, but in most cases, especially on social media, like what most people mean when they say body count is how many people you've had sex with. That's it. How many bodies you have had sexual relations with or sexual interactions with. Right? So somebody says, "what's your body count?" they're asking you "how many people have you had sex with?". That's it. Now, in a different context, body count means how many people you've killed. So context is everything.

[00:40:58] What is the most important to talk well English?

[00:41:04] To talk, I say it every time. Like, maybe you've never heard me say it before. But if you've been following me for at least a month, you've heard me say it before for sure. It's the best way to speak English well or to learn to speak English well is to speak English, bro. That's it. That's it. So you need to find a teacher or a language exchange partner or a friend or whatever you need to do, a human being that can tell you when you're saying something that sounds weird or that's grammatically incorrect or teach you about the language, the culture, the expressions, help you with your pronunciation, all the type of stuff. But you can't do that if you're not talking to a real person.

[00:41:44] So find a real person and talk to them. Everything else is helpful, but it's secondary in comparison to the talking part. Like, if I asked you, "how do you learn to play soccer?". What would you say? If I asked you, "how do you learn to play saxophone?". What would you say? Practice, right? Take classes or a course, watch videos, and you fucking practice until you're good.

[00:42:10] And you get better by being around people that are better than you. You become a better soccer player by playing with players that play better than you. Not people on the same level or people that don't play as good as you. How could you possibly get better? It's people that are better than you that push you, that force you to become a better version of yourself or to do that skill or to improve that skill. Let's say, that's a better way of saying it, right? So it's the same with everything else.

[00:42:36] If you want to be a great musician, you have to be around musicians greater than you. Naturally, you're going to get inspired and notice their techniques and, you know, take those things and make them your own. It's the same thing with language. So if we're talking about language, English, in this case, if you want to be a better English speaker, speak English to people that speak English better than you. Most of the time, not always, but most of the time that's a native.

[00:43:00] But I should also say you don't need a native to become fluent in English. Somebody who speaks English very well can also teach you, even if it's their second, third, or fourteenth language, it doesn't really matter. So I think you should leave that idea to the side too if you have that in your head. Anybody who speaks English better than you can help you improve your English. So by being around and interacting with people who have a higher skill level than you in this case, English, you're going to improve your English. All right, cool.

[00:43:32] All right y'all, so I'm about to get out of here, man. My plan was to be here for an hour and it's been two. So hopefully y'all enjoyed the live. Maybe you learned some few... some few things?! Maybe you learned a few things or got some things to think about. You know? But thank you for being here. Thank you for your time and attention because you could have given it to anybody, but you gave it to me. So I appreciate it.

[00:43:53] Hopefully, you got the value from the live. I'm going to try to do it again, I'm going to say next Friday, I'm going to try to do it again around the same time another live stream. I can't say for sure yet, but I'm gonna try. All right. But one thing is for sure, I'll be back. All right? So what's today, Thursday? Right? Yeah, it's Thursday. So y'all have a great rest of your day or your night, Friday as well. You know what I'm saying? And hopefully, you enjoy the weekend. More videos coming soon, more lessons, more podcasts, man. I'ma holler at y'all real soon. Y'all stay safe. Take care of yourselves. And I see you when I see you. Peace!

[END OF EPISODE]

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[00:00:01] Life in English live stream. Talking about nothing, number 4.

[00:00:06] Here we go.

[00:00:12] Put it right about there, okay. Welcome to the live, y'all. We're just doing a live stream. I'm not talking about anything in particular. So feel free to ask all your questions, leave your comments. I'ma just be talking about some random stuff. This is really more like advanced listening practice in a chance for you to get your questions answered. Stuff like that.

[00:00:30] So we're just going to chill and hang out for probably an hour. I'm not going to do two and a half hours like I did last week, but I'll probably be here at least an hour. So leave your comments, man. I'm going to try to get to all of them. All right, give me a second. I'm trying to read the comments, y'all.

[00:00:48] Can you please explain the difference between than and then?

[00:00:56] The difference between than and then. So than is T H A N. Then is T H E N. Right? So 'than' is the word that we use to compare quantities, right? For example, "I have more than you" or "you have more than me" or "we have less than them" or "they have less than us". That's T H A N. That's the way that we use that word. So whenever we're comparing the quantities of two things or the possession of two things, stuff like that, we're going to use the word 'than'. More than or less than or equal to. Right?

[00:01:35] Now, then T H E N. I think it depends on the context, actually. But 'then' is typically a word that we use to describe what's going to happen next. For example, "I'm going to the store and then I'm going home". Right? So I'm going to the store and after that or and then, which is basically the same thing, this next thing is going to happen. So that's typically the way we use the word then. But we also use the word then T H E N, in a way that's like... you know how when somebody tells you something, sometimes you respond in a way that's basically saying, "well, if this is the case, this other thing is also the case".

[00:02:20] That probably doesn't make sense the way I said it, so let me give you an example. Let's imagine you're talking to your friend, and he says, "if we don't go to the beach, then I don't want to go anywhere". That's one way of using the word then, like the way I just explained. But then you can respond by saying, "then let's go to the beach". So in that case, when I start the sentence with 'then' I'm saying, "well, if that's the case, this other thing is going to be the case". You know?

[00:02:50] I don't know, I can't remember the grammatical term for the word. I don't think it's conjunction. But let me know if that makes any sense. That's the difference to me between the two words and how we use them. If I had more time to think about it, I could probably explain it to you better, but there you go.

[00:03:06] Difference between could have and should have.

[00:03:10] That's a good question. So what's your name, bro? I am a stranger60. Whatever your name is, stranger. The difference between could have and should have. "Could have" is what we say, simply to express the fact that you had an opportunity in the past and you had an opportunity to take advantage of a situation or whatever it is. So you're just expressing the fact that there was a possibility that something happened or could have happened. I'm trying to explain it without using the words could have.

[00:03:46] Now, "should have" is what we say when we want to express the fact that we believe that the right thing to do was this thing. Like, for example... It's probably better if I explain with an example. Ah okay, so let's just say going to the movies, for example. We're talking about going out to the movies and we don't go. And the next day I say, "man, we could have gone to the movies". So all I'm expressing is that there was the possibility that we went to the movies. We were capable of doing it. We had the opportunity so we could have gone. Right? But if I say, "man, we should have gone to the movies". What I'm expressing is that I think the right thing to do would have been to go to the movies. That would have been the best choice, the best way to spend our night, the best decision to make.

[00:04:37] Because when you say "should", if you're saying something should be, you're expressing the idea that you think that's the right thing. You think that's the way it should be. Like when you tell somebody, "you should be a teacher". You're saying, "I recognize your talent, and I think the right thing for you to do is to be a teacher. That's what you should do". If I say you could be a teacher, it's like, "well, you have the ability and it's possible there's nothing stopping you". So it's the same thing as should have and could have. We're just referring to something in the past. Let me know if that makes sense. I don't know if I explained that clearly, but let me know.

[00:05:12] Hi, can you explain "have got" and when we need to use it? Please.

[00:05:18] Lom1008 I think is your name or your screen name. So have got... I mean, off the top of my head trying to explain like, what it is when I hear "have got" it just means "I have". It's just another way of saying I have. For example, "I have three kids" or "I have got three kids". Now, we typically don't say have got in informal speech. We'd say "I've got", which is a contracted version of I have got. So I'd say, "I have three kids" or "I've got three kids". And to me it's the same thing. But "I've got" is just more informal, you know?

[00:06:05] But it's really, really common, at least here in the States to hear people say I've got. Or for example, like "gotta". The contraction "gotta" a lot of people think, you know, got to, for example. I've gotta go to the store. But really the complete phrase is "I have got to go to the store". But we say "I've got to go to the store". You know, so we're just saying I have to go to the store. It's just another way of saying it. You know? So I don't know if that makes sense, but to simplify it, it's the same thing as saying "I have", it's just less formal. You know? At least the way I think about it off the top of my head. That's the answer.

[00:06:47] How's your Spanish?

[00:06:50] On a scale of one to ten? Honestly, five. Yeah, five. Six on a good day, but five. People tell me that it's higher than that, but I think they're just being nice. I'm pretty self-aware and I hear myself speaking Spanish, trying to express myself and I would say, from zero to ten it's probably a five. Which technically is an F for fucking sucks. Let me go back to these comments, I know there's a lot.

[00:07:24] What is facts?

[00:07:28] What is facts? Oh, okay, that's a good question. So facts is kind of like, um, I guess you could call it slang. It's just a word that we say when somebody is speaking the truth because... And you spelled it F A X, which is like an electronic device, something completely different. But facts F A C T S, facts. When somebody says that it means they're saying like, what you're saying is true and I agree. Like, that's real shit, like real talk, facts. Because you're not lying. If you're speaking facts, if what you're saying is a fact, then it's not a lie. It's not false. So that's why people say that. Like I might say, "Messi is the greatest player of all time" and you might say, "facts". And you're saying that's a fact, that's true. Right? That's not false. So that's what facts means.

[00:08:22] How do you be good at English? Practice English.

[00:08:33] Can you stop worrying about...? Oh, damn, I can't read today. How can I stop worrying about my English when I start talking to native speakers on social media?

[00:08:47] How? I don't know if this answer is going to be helpful to you, but this is just what I would do if I were you. This is what I've done. I think the subject of like learning how to be more calm or confident or secure, sure of yourself, whatever it is, especially when in public or especially when interacting with other people.

[00:09:18] Like, you know, a lot of people have a bunch of different techniques and recommendations, but what worked for me, man, is just making the simple choice to not care. Like, it's a choice that you can make. You know? You obviously can't control the thoughts that enter your mind involuntarily. Right? But you can choose to entertain them or not. And when I say entertain I mean like, give them your time, attention, and consideration. Right? Acknowledge them. You don't have to. So in a moment where you're like, feeling insecure or afraid or you're hearing these negative thoughts, you don't have to pay attention to that stuff. I know that sounds like maybe an oversimplification. Like maybe it doesn't even make sense.

[00:09:56] What I'm trying to say is like, you can choose to just not care. You can choose that. So how do you stop caring? Just fucking decide, like, I don't care. I wish I had like, a more detailed, like beautiful answer or something like that. But it really is just a conscious choice that you make to care or not care about something. So if you just, if you know that you can speak English, you can communicate, you can understand when people talk to you. Like, just say what you got to say. You know? I think you just have to stop worrying about what the consequences are going to be. That probably doesn't sound good. But what I mean is a lot of times people are nervous because they're anticipating a negative outcome. They're anticipating like, disaster. They're imagining the worst-case scenario a lot of times, and that makes them scared.

[00:10:46] So if you just choose to focus on the present moment and just communicate, or if you choose to think positive thoughts or choose to just not care at all what happens, especially when you know you have good intentions. I mean, what more can you do? That's just works for me. I don't know what to tell you, is hard to tell you how you should do something because I'm not you, you know, but that's what I did. It works for me.

[00:11:16] Somebody wants me to do a quick pronunciation exercise. So the words CAP, CUP and COP. Before I say them, I want you to think to yourself, how do you pronounce these words? C A P. How would you pronounce that? Obviously, I can't hear you, but I want you to say it out loud. I don't care if you're on the bus, I don't care if you're in the kitchen, I don't care what you're doing right now. Say it out loud. CAP. How do you pronounce that? I would pronounce it, cap. Cap is cap. Like, "no cap, bro" "stop capping, nigga.. fuck you mean". That's cap. Right? Cap, and cap. All right? So C A P is cap. Hopefully, you got that one right.

[00:12:03] Now, the next one is what? C U P, CUP. How would you pronounce that word? Again, say it out loud. One more time. C U P. How do you pronounce it? I would say, cup. So instead of "ah" like cap, we say "oh", like cup or fuck or stuck or truck or bus or but or what. Cup. Right? So CAP, Cap. CUP, cup. The last one, C O P. How would you pronounce that word? COP. I would say, cop. Cop, you know?

[00:12:53] So CAP, cap. CUP, cup. COP, cop. I block and stop and watch and pop and rock, shock, cop. Okay? So ah, uh, oh. Those are the three sounds. Hopefully that helps.

[00:13:14] Why do you know Spanish?

[00:13:17] Because some of my good friends in college were Mexican, and they were always speaking Spanish, and I got tired of being the only fucking guy in the room that couldn't understand. So I asked him to teach me Spanish one day and the rest was kind of, you know, history, as they say.

[00:13:35] Do you think that it's hard to learn Spanish?

[00:13:39] Honestly, I don't. I really don't. I think Spanish is a very simple language, and if you speak English, it's definitely the first foreign language that you should learn. Yeah, I think it's one of the... I'm not going to say it's one of the easiest languages to learn because I have no idea about the difficulty of, you know, all the languages.

[00:14:00] But, and maybe I'm just, you know, naturally like predisposed to learn languages. Maybe it would be extremely hard for other English speakers, I don't know. But in my experience, Spanish was not easy to learn. But it's a simple language, you know, so if you just practice and study, then it's not difficult because it follows very clear and consistent patterns in terms of pronunciation, verb conjugation, grammar, and things like that.

[00:14:31] The grammar was a challenge at first, for sure. You just have to get used to it. And my grammar still is not that good today, but I can make myself understood and people tell me that my grammar is okay, so. So we're talking about like, standard textbook, correct Spanish, then maybe it's difficult. I don't know because I don't know that type of Spanish, but the spoken language in general to me is not difficult. The difficulty of Spanish is understanding Spanish speakers because you talk so fucking fast. You know what I mean? Especially from certain countries. Just talk so fast. And not only that but like, different countries have different words for the same objects or feelings or situations. You know what I mean?

[00:15:12] Like, I think it was maybe it feels like a month ago, I learned the word vaina, which I guess is heavily used in the Dominican Republic. Which can be anything. The word vaina can be anything. Stuff like that. I've been speaking Spanish five years. I had never heard that word before because I never really talked to anybody from the Dominican, you know? But anyway, I said all that to say, I don't think it's too difficult. I just think the challenge is understanding all Spanish speakers from all over the world. Because Spanish is Spanish, but at the same time it definitely changes from region to region. Right? Just like any other language, I imagine, so...

[00:15:56] Turn this live in Spanish. Nope! Can't do it. Life in English.

[00:16:02] Have you done the IELTS test?

[00:16:04] No, I have not. Isn't the IELTS for people trying to prove that they can speak English? I think, I don't think English teachers take the IELTS. To be honest, I don't know. But I don't think they do. But no, I've never taken that test. I've never taken any exam to test my English level other than in public school, obviously.

[00:16:24] And there was one class that like, I fucking hated school in general, but that was one class that I just naturally did good in. Like I remember in multiple years during my schooling, my teachers, my literature teachers telling me like, that I was doing really good in the class. Like, I was a good writer and I could like, formulate and express my ideas really well. You know? That was something that came natural, but everything else certainly did not.

[00:16:48] Like, I'm terrible at math, you know. I don't even, I'm not even sure I could do like, eighth-grade level math right now. And I find myself constantly trying to do simple multiplication equations, division, and stuff like that just with money and other things and time and stuff. And can't do it. You know? You didn't ask me about that. So let me get back to these questions.

[00:17:13] What's the best way to learn English?

[00:17:19] The answer to that question is subjective because everybody's different, right? Some people prefer to learn things by doing things, like me. I like to learn by experience, I like to put my hands on it, take it apart, put it together, and play with it to see how it works. Figuratively and literally. Right? But some people like, need to watch a video of it being done, and then immediately they can just go do it. Other people if you just talk to them and they just hear and they can learn that way. Other people need to read their instructions or their lesson or whatever it is. So everybody's different. Some people will prefer to listen to podcasts, other people will prefer TV series, some people prefer music or the news or talking to real people. You know?

[00:18:04] So what's the best way? I don't know if there is one best way. I would say the most effective thing you can be doing, though, is talking to real people. You know? Everybody does all that other stuff. Podcasts, movies, books, series, music, etc. But the most effective way to improve your listening and speaking skills is listening and talking to a human being. So if I had to choose, I would say that's the best way.

[00:18:32] Will ever I be fluent in English like you? What is my hope there?

[00:18:44] Will you ever be fluent in English like me? I don't know what you mean by that. So I can't really answer that part of your question. But I mean, I understand that you're asking, will you ever get to a high level of English. Like native level? I mean, it's my first language, bro. So I don't know if you're saying, will you ever speak it as if you were born speaking it? I don't know. I mean, it's definitely possible. People do it all the time. I've never done it.

[00:19:10] So, and to be honest, I don't know if that should be your focus. I don't think your goal when learning to speak a foreign language should be speaking it as if you have been speaking it since you were born. I don't think the goal should be to speak it exactly like you speak your first language. I mean, that's such a difficult thing to achieve. You know what I mean? So it's like if you're always... I mean, I guess if you want to shoot for the stars or whatever, then yeah, that's cool. But a lot of times you might just be setting yourself up or, in other words, preparing yourself for disappointment. You know? Because you're never or it's going to take so long to reach that goal, generally speaking, for most people, that you might start to feel demotivated. Like, "man, it's never going to be perfect". And then you start to lose hope.

[00:19:58] So I think a much more realistic, attainable goal is to be conversational. To be able to sit down with almost anybody and have a conversation. Or go to almost any English-speaking country and be able to survive and communicate. That should be the goal. Because once you get to that place, you can talk to anybody and then everything that comes after that, it's just like a bonus. It's extra. You never stop learning new words, expressions or getting exposed to different accents. Not just the language itself but the culture that's influencing that language, you learn about that stuff too. You know?

[00:20:34] So I think you should focus much more on that, man. Not being perfect or speaking just like me, but being conversational. Because if you're conversational, that means that you have mastered the fundamentals, which is always the most important part of anything that you're doing. So master the fundamentals and then just kind of build on top of that, understanding that it's going to take time. But the more effort you put in, the better the results you get out. So it's really up to you. So is there any hope? I don't know. You tell me. You know, another question I have, bro.

[00:21:05] And I was thinking, like before I started recording is when I was thinking about Christmas is around the corner as well as my birthday is next month and stuff like that, and I was thinking about why do people celebrate? Why do people exchange gifts on Christmas and stuff? And after hearing myself speak, just in case you don't understand, when I say Christmas is around the corner, that's an expression that means like, it's very close. It's going to happen very soon.

[00:21:30] So I was thinking about all that and birthdays and stuff, and it made me ask myself like, why do people fear getting older? Have you ever asked yourself that question? Like, why do people... Why are they so afraid of getting older? And you see it all around the world and I think with men and women. You know? People who are like afraid of getting wrinkles in their face or their body not functioning like it once did. All that type of stuff, getting sick, dying, and things like that. Not looking as physically attractive as you did when you were 21 or 30 or whatever.

[00:22:06] Why do you think people are so afraid of getting old? And do you think it's just the physical aspect of getting old that people are uncomfortable with? Because when you think about the emotional or the, let's say, intellectual for lack of a better word, the spiritual aspects of getting older like, it's a net positive, in my opinion. Hopefully, as you get older you get wiser. Like, you have more life experiences and you're learning from those experiences and you're applying that newfound knowledge to, you know, your future or the next experiences, however you say it. And you're learning and you're getting better. You're constantly becoming a better, smarter, more evolved, and optimized version of yourself as you get older.

[00:22:53] Because when you're young, bro, you're fucking 14, 18, 21. I mean, even 25 or 30, in some cases. It's like, you don't know shit bro, you're dumb as hell. Don't really have the experience that you need to be the person that you should be. So and maybe that doesn't make sense. But what I'm saying is like typically, generally speaking, the younger the people are like, the less experienced they are. Which means the less wise they are, which means the less than optimal choices they make. You know what I'm saying?

[00:23:25] So I think getting older like you get wiser, you get smarter and you learn how to live better in a way that's better for you. You learn how to be yourself, or more of yourself. You know what I mean? Getting older is the shit. Obviously, it comes with responsibility, but you know, that's just life. So being like young and dumb is fun, I guess. But I think being old and smart is pretty fucking cool, too. What do you guys think?

[00:23:54] It's fun. Like, when we are kids we want to be grown. And when we get old, people want to go back.

[00:24:00] Yeah, absolutely, man. It's like the classic experience for a lot of people when we're young, we want to be grown and have independence and just do what we want and, you know, all that type of stuff. Because we don't really know, most of the time nobody explains to us that what we imagine as life as an adult is just a small piece of the entire pie. You know? It comes with a lot more responsibility and freedom, which also comes with responsibility. Like, we imagine the freedom that adults have, but we don't understand that you cannot separate freedom from responsibility. You know?

[00:24:36] So I think that's why as kids, we want so badly to be adults. And then as adults like, I don't necessarily I want to be a kid anymore. It's not like I want to go back to my childhood. Yeah, to be honest, I don't think I would if I had the chance, if I could just go back to being the kid, I don't even think I would. I would prefer to like, learn how to take the best aspects of what it meant to be a kid and integrate them into my adult life. I would prefer to do that. You know? But you're right, a lot of people do feel that way. I don't know. I just don't understand why people fear getting older. I don't know if it's the fear of losing your physical attractiveness, I don't know if it's the fear of death itself. If it's the fear of sickness or what exactly. I don't know.

[00:25:33] Which makes me think of a really, really interesting idea that a friend of mine told me a couple of years ago when we were talking about life after death and reincarnation and things like that. And what she believes is that reincarnation is real, but it's not based on how good or how bad of a person you are during your life. That's not what determines what you will be in the next life. For example, if you're just a saint, an amazing person in the next life, you'll have higher social status, more fortune, more money, or whatever it is. Your life isn't going to be better for that reason. Or if you're just a piece of shit and you're an asshole, you're not going to be born as somebody like anus or something like that. Or you're not going to be poor and broke and miserable in your next life. She doesn't believe that's how it works.

[00:26:21] She believes that reincarnation is based on how many and how well, how many lessons and how well you learned them during your life. So how many life lessons you can manage to learn doing your life. Because during your entire lifetime life is throwing these situations at you and you have a chance to learn something from every experience, right? So she believes based on how you learn your life lessons or if you learn them, that will determine the quality of your next life.

[00:26:52] So if you go through life learning the lessons that you're supposed to learn, you're paying attention, you're trying to evolve and grow. Your next life will not be better. It will be easier to accomplish the things that you want to accomplish because you learned the lessons that you needed to learn in your past life, which sets you up for the next one.

[00:27:08] Now, if you go through life just refusing to learn, the lessons that life or God or the universe or whatever, however you see it, whatever you want to call it. Let's just call it life. If you refuse to learn those lessons like, your next life is going to be even harder because you refused to learn the things that you needed to learn before you went on to your next life. And then it just creates this positive or negative feedback loop. And that's how she thinks reincarnation works.

[00:27:34] And ever since she shared that idea with me, like, I've never stopped thinking about it. And I think I became, like, more attentive to that idea and like trying to put more attention on whether or not I'm learning the lessons I'm supposed to be learning from the experiences that I'm having. You know? It's an interesting idea. What do you guys think? Do you guys believe in reincarnation? Life after death? What do you guys think?

[00:28:04] Bro, you're 26 years old, you're already worried about being an adult?

[00:28:14] I don't understand the question, actually. It's a good question. Or it's a curious question, but I don't really understand what you mean. Like, 26 is too young to be thinking about my adult life? I completely disagree. I completely disagree. And maybe I'm, I guess I understand what you're trying to say, which is like, "Man, enjoy your life, you're young. You don't have to worry about this, that and the third". And I never said that I was worried about being an adult, first of all. So I don't know when you heard that because I never said that. But second of all, I guess what you're trying to say is like, "Enjoy your life while you're young. 26 is young". I totally agree, but that doesn't mean that you can't be thinking about your adult life. Like, where you want your life to go, if you don't think about it, then what the fuck are you going to do? You're just going to let life happen to you? I don't know. I just, I see things differently. Obviously, we might have a difference of opinion, but I just see it differently.

[00:29:13] I think we don't get taught to think about our adult lives early enough. Or we get taught to think about the wrong aspects of our adult life or we get taught to think about it in the wrong way, as if it's just responsibility, responsibility, bills go to school, get a job, have a family, raise that family, get sick and die. And that's why I think people are so afraid of it. You know? Either because it's all unknown and they don't know what to do or all they see is misery and bills and taxes and a job that they hate because they can't make a living doing what they want, because everybody told them it was impossible, that type of shit. You know what I'm saying? But you don't have to think about it that way.

[00:29:50] I think if, it depends on how you teach the kid as well. Like, as a child, you can teach them about tax laws and philosophy and human psychology, you just have to break it down into little pieces that they can consume and still get the idea. You know? So you can teach kids to think about their life as an adult, what they want to do with their lives without making it too serious or too heavy, or too dramatic. And give them the tools and the mindset and way of thinking that they need so that when they finally decide or find out what they want to do with their adult life, they have the mental capacity and resources to get it done as opposed to just being young and dumb and having fun until you're 35 and then saying, "okay, let me get serious about life". I'm sure that works for somebody, but it doesn't work for me, you know. So I guess it's just two different ways of seeing it. And again, I didn't understand your question and I responded anyway. So forgive me if I took it out of context or misunderstood it, but that's what I think.

[00:30:49] Could you explain different ways to say "I like you"?

[00:30:57] That's a good question. Different ways to say "I like you". I've never thought about that. I mean, I guess like, if I were to say it, depending on where I was, obviously, but like where I grew up, where I went to high school, for example, where I live right now. We would probably say, "I fuck with you". And when I say 'we', I'm talking about like, people that I hang out with or people like me. It's kind of like, when I say "I fuck with you", that's kind of like Ebonics or what some people know as like, "black English" or AAVE. There's different names for it. But that's not like a standard English expression. That's just like how we talk where I'm from or like how a lot of black people talk.

[00:31:44] So if I say I fuck with you, it means not only do I like you, but like, you have my respect, I think you're cool. You know, like we could be friends or we are friends, that type of thing. If I don't fuck with you, it means I don't like you, I don't respect you, I don't want to be near you, I don't want to hang out with you, or nothing like that. So if I do fuck with you, obviously that's the opposite, the positive version of that. So I would say don't use that like at work with somebody you don't know. Do not write that in the email. It's extremely informal. Some people might not even understand it because "to fuck with you" also has a different meaning in a different context. And that's a universal phrase.

[00:32:19] So I'm probably confusing you at this point. But that's one way to say "I like you, I respect you, I think you're cool". I fuck with you. But it's extremely informal, and most people consider it slang, but it's really just a different dialect to English. So something standard, another way to say I like you. I think you're cool. I really don't know another way to say I like you. I would just say, "I like you". Or "you're cool" or something like that. I guess you're cool is a decent way to say I like you. Or I guess you could say it without saying it like, I enjoy your company. I like being around you. I enjoy your presence. I enjoy spending time with you. You're fun to be around or something like that. I mean, I really don't know another way to say I like you, but maybe some of those might be helpful to you. All right.

[00:33:19] Alo Sandoval says, "I guess that's better understand the English, because if you translate just the phrase or something..." Did she write more? Hang on. Maybe she wrote more. "A lot of time you're missing the context if you only translate".

[00:33:42] That's exactly right, and you basically expressed it a hundred times better than I ever could. That's what I was trying to say. I just couldn't find the words. So thank you for that. Because that's really what I was trying to express, is that when you're always translating you're ignoring the fact that context determines the meaning of the phrase. Right? And culture and a lot of times context and culture go hand in hand, but without those things, it's just words. And it can be interpreted in many different ways, depending on the context or culture. So that's exactly right. That's why it's better to just understand it. And it's better just to learn how to learn.

[00:34:20] A lot of times we like, you can't think about language like math or science where 1+1 is 2, sometimes one 1+1 is 17, and it makes perfect sense. When speaking about language. Right? It makes perfect sense. Again, I could say, "I don't fuck with you". Like, literally in the 1+1= 2 way of thinking, it doesn't even make sense. I don't fuck with you. It's like that means I don't have sex with you. Or we don't have sex together with somebody else. It doesn't make literal sense. I don't fuck with you. Because "to fuck", the verb has many meanings. But like to have sex, if I don't fuck with you, it means that we don't fuck together. It doesn't make sense. But in the 1+1 is 17 way of thinking. Right? Which is the way you should be thinking about language, makes perfect sense to me. But to somebody else it doesn't, and that's the point. It's 1+1 is not always 2 when you're thinking about language, which is why just translating all the time is slowing you down. You're not going to become fluent doing that for the rest of your life. You know?

[00:35:28] Can you explain when to use problem and issue?

[00:35:30] Problem and issue are the same exact thing. "Issue" is just a more formal way of saying "problem". So I guess you can use the word issue at work, in emails, and stuff like that. Or if you, you know, I guess, the word "problem" sounds worse, it has a little bit more of a negative connotation than issue. Because the issue is something that can be resolved, there's a solution. A problem is like, "fuck, we've got a problem". Just in terms of the way the words feel to me. I don't know if that makes sense. But they're the same thing. Problem, issue, informal, formal. That's it. So let me take one last look at these questions and comments before I get up out of here.

[00:36:11] *Reading in Spanish*.

[00:36:19] How can you refer... Different ways you can refer to somebody as friend.

[00:36:30] I think it depends on where you're from, what your culture is, and if you're referring to a man or a woman. So I'm going to try to think of some good examples. So I could say if we're talking about a guy my age, I could say, "that's my friend" and that's universal. I can say, "that's my partner" which is, like here in the south we say partner, but it's the word "partner". If I pronounce it that way, you'll probably understand P A R T N E R. But in the South, a lot of people say "partner", it's just a different way of pronouncing the word.

[00:37:09] So if I say, "that's my partner right there", that's my friend. Or I could say "homie" H O M I E, "that's my homie right there". And now partner and homie are considered very informal words. You know? But if you think about the meaning of the word, it just means friend. That's my friend. That's my partner. That's my homie. That's my boy. You know? So again, if you're referring to a guy, "that's my boy right there" that's my friend. You know, we're close. That's my boy. That's my partner. That's my homie. You know what I'm saying? I'm trying to think of some other ones.

[00:37:41] Now this, I'm going to tell you this, but I do not recommend you say this. I just want you to know what it means if I say, "that's my nigga", that also can mean that's my friend, that's my boy, that's my homie. I fuck with him. Going back to that same phrase. I fuck with him. That's my nigga. That's my homie. You know? That's really what it means. So again, I do not recommend you say that. Please, I mean, you say whatever you want, I'm not going to tell you what to say, I don't believe in that type of thing. I'm just saying, the word "nigga" for a lot of people is very, very, very offensive, to black people I mean, it's very offensive if it's being said to them by somebody that's not black.

[00:38:23] Now, this is a very complex and deep subject, so I won't get into it now. I want to stay on topic. But just so, you know, if I say "that's my nigga" I mean that's my friend. And typically I'm talking about a guy, not a girl. I can say "that girl is my nigga". Sometimes we say that, but most of the time it's a guy. Now, words for... I'm trying to think of words that we use for girls. In this case, I would just say friend. I don't know what other girls refer to their girlfriends as. They probably say, "My friend. That's my girl". Just like we say, "that's my boy". They would say that's my girl. Or "my homegirl", I guess some girls might say that. I don't really hear it too often, though. But a lot of girls in my experience, especially like my age range, like 18 to 35, they might say, "that's my girl, that's my friend".

[00:39:09] I can't really think of a bunch of other words that we use for that. Now something much more formal it's like "colleague", which is technically not a friend. But, you know, a colleague is somebody that you interact with on a regular basis, it could be at work or something like that. Most of the time it's at work. A colleague is somebody that you work with. That's not necessarily your friend. Now you could also say "associate", which again, is not a friend. It's kind of like something less than a friend, but I'm just trying to give you more formal words that aren't necessarily "friend". Because a friend is somebody that's close, that you trust, have a good time with, you have fun with them, you just want to spend time with them. Now an associate is somebody with whom you associate. You're not necessarily friends, but you have to do business with this person or interact with this person for whatever reason. So it's an associate. Those are some words that either mean friend or are related to the word friend. Hopefully, that was helpful.

[00:40:07] Okay. HK368 says he or she, I'm not sure, doesn't understand the body count question. So just in case you don't understand or even know what I'm talking about, the body count question obviously is a question about your body count. So, a body count depending on the context, but in most cases, especially on social media, like what most people mean when they say body count is how many people you've had sex with. That's it. How many bodies you have had sexual relations with or sexual interactions with. Right? So somebody says, "what's your body count?" they're asking you "how many people have you had sex with?". That's it. Now, in a different context, body count means how many people you've killed. So context is everything.

[00:40:58] What is the most important to talk well English?

[00:41:04] To talk, I say it every time. Like, maybe you've never heard me say it before. But if you've been following me for at least a month, you've heard me say it before for sure. It's the best way to speak English well or to learn to speak English well is to speak English, bro. That's it. That's it. So you need to find a teacher or a language exchange partner or a friend or whatever you need to do, a human being that can tell you when you're saying something that sounds weird or that's grammatically incorrect or teach you about the language, the culture, the expressions, help you with your pronunciation, all the type of stuff. But you can't do that if you're not talking to a real person.

[00:41:44] So find a real person and talk to them. Everything else is helpful, but it's secondary in comparison to the talking part. Like, if I asked you, "how do you learn to play soccer?". What would you say? If I asked you, "how do you learn to play saxophone?". What would you say? Practice, right? Take classes or a course, watch videos, and you fucking practice until you're good.

[00:42:10] And you get better by being around people that are better than you. You become a better soccer player by playing with players that play better than you. Not people on the same level or people that don't play as good as you. How could you possibly get better? It's people that are better than you that push you, that force you to become a better version of yourself or to do that skill or to improve that skill. Let's say, that's a better way of saying it, right? So it's the same with everything else.

[00:42:36] If you want to be a great musician, you have to be around musicians greater than you. Naturally, you're going to get inspired and notice their techniques and, you know, take those things and make them your own. It's the same thing with language. So if we're talking about language, English, in this case, if you want to be a better English speaker, speak English to people that speak English better than you. Most of the time, not always, but most of the time that's a native.

[00:43:00] But I should also say you don't need a native to become fluent in English. Somebody who speaks English very well can also teach you, even if it's their second, third, or fourteenth language, it doesn't really matter. So I think you should leave that idea to the side too if you have that in your head. Anybody who speaks English better than you can help you improve your English. So by being around and interacting with people who have a higher skill level than you in this case, English, you're going to improve your English. All right, cool.

[00:43:32] All right y'all, so I'm about to get out of here, man. My plan was to be here for an hour and it's been two. So hopefully y'all enjoyed the live. Maybe you learned some few... some few things?! Maybe you learned a few things or got some things to think about. You know? But thank you for being here. Thank you for your time and attention because you could have given it to anybody, but you gave it to me. So I appreciate it.

[00:43:53] Hopefully, you got the value from the live. I'm going to try to do it again, I'm going to say next Friday, I'm going to try to do it again around the same time another live stream. I can't say for sure yet, but I'm gonna try. All right. But one thing is for sure, I'll be back. All right? So what's today, Thursday? Right? Yeah, it's Thursday. So y'all have a great rest of your day or your night, Friday as well. You know what I'm saying? And hopefully, you enjoy the weekend. More videos coming soon, more lessons, more podcasts, man. I'ma holler at y'all real soon. Y'all stay safe. Take care of yourselves. And I see you when I see you. Peace!

[END OF EPISODE]

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[00:00:01] Life in English live stream. Talking about nothing, number 4.

[00:00:06] Here we go.

[00:00:12] Put it right about there, okay. Welcome to the live, y'all. We're just doing a live stream. I'm not talking about anything in particular. So feel free to ask all your questions, leave your comments. I'ma just be talking about some random stuff. This is really more like advanced listening practice in a chance for you to get your questions answered. Stuff like that.

[00:00:30] So we're just going to chill and hang out for probably an hour. I'm not going to do two and a half hours like I did last week, but I'll probably be here at least an hour. So leave your comments, man. I'm going to try to get to all of them. All right, give me a second. I'm trying to read the comments, y'all.

[00:00:48] Can you please explain the difference between than and then?

[00:00:56] The difference between than and then. So than is T H A N. Then is T H E N. Right? So 'than' is the word that we use to compare quantities, right? For example, "I have more than you" or "you have more than me" or "we have less than them" or "they have less than us". That's T H A N. That's the way that we use that word. So whenever we're comparing the quantities of two things or the possession of two things, stuff like that, we're going to use the word 'than'. More than or less than or equal to. Right?

[00:01:35] Now, then T H E N. I think it depends on the context, actually. But 'then' is typically a word that we use to describe what's going to happen next. For example, "I'm going to the store and then I'm going home". Right? So I'm going to the store and after that or and then, which is basically the same thing, this next thing is going to happen. So that's typically the way we use the word then. But we also use the word then T H E N, in a way that's like... you know how when somebody tells you something, sometimes you respond in a way that's basically saying, "well, if this is the case, this other thing is also the case".

[00:02:20] That probably doesn't make sense the way I said it, so let me give you an example. Let's imagine you're talking to your friend, and he says, "if we don't go to the beach, then I don't want to go anywhere". That's one way of using the word then, like the way I just explained. But then you can respond by saying, "then let's go to the beach". So in that case, when I start the sentence with 'then' I'm saying, "well, if that's the case, this other thing is going to be the case". You know?

[00:02:50] I don't know, I can't remember the grammatical term for the word. I don't think it's conjunction. But let me know if that makes any sense. That's the difference to me between the two words and how we use them. If I had more time to think about it, I could probably explain it to you better, but there you go.

[00:03:06] Difference between could have and should have.

[00:03:10] That's a good question. So what's your name, bro? I am a stranger60. Whatever your name is, stranger. The difference between could have and should have. "Could have" is what we say, simply to express the fact that you had an opportunity in the past and you had an opportunity to take advantage of a situation or whatever it is. So you're just expressing the fact that there was a possibility that something happened or could have happened. I'm trying to explain it without using the words could have.

[00:03:46] Now, "should have" is what we say when we want to express the fact that we believe that the right thing to do was this thing. Like, for example... It's probably better if I explain with an example. Ah okay, so let's just say going to the movies, for example. We're talking about going out to the movies and we don't go. And the next day I say, "man, we could have gone to the movies". So all I'm expressing is that there was the possibility that we went to the movies. We were capable of doing it. We had the opportunity so we could have gone. Right? But if I say, "man, we should have gone to the movies". What I'm expressing is that I think the right thing to do would have been to go to the movies. That would have been the best choice, the best way to spend our night, the best decision to make.

[00:04:37] Because when you say "should", if you're saying something should be, you're expressing the idea that you think that's the right thing. You think that's the way it should be. Like when you tell somebody, "you should be a teacher". You're saying, "I recognize your talent, and I think the right thing for you to do is to be a teacher. That's what you should do". If I say you could be a teacher, it's like, "well, you have the ability and it's possible there's nothing stopping you". So it's the same thing as should have and could have. We're just referring to something in the past. Let me know if that makes sense. I don't know if I explained that clearly, but let me know.

[00:05:12] Hi, can you explain "have got" and when we need to use it? Please.

[00:05:18] Lom1008 I think is your name or your screen name. So have got... I mean, off the top of my head trying to explain like, what it is when I hear "have got" it just means "I have". It's just another way of saying I have. For example, "I have three kids" or "I have got three kids". Now, we typically don't say have got in informal speech. We'd say "I've got", which is a contracted version of I have got. So I'd say, "I have three kids" or "I've got three kids". And to me it's the same thing. But "I've got" is just more informal, you know?

[00:06:05] But it's really, really common, at least here in the States to hear people say I've got. Or for example, like "gotta". The contraction "gotta" a lot of people think, you know, got to, for example. I've gotta go to the store. But really the complete phrase is "I have got to go to the store". But we say "I've got to go to the store". You know, so we're just saying I have to go to the store. It's just another way of saying it. You know? So I don't know if that makes sense, but to simplify it, it's the same thing as saying "I have", it's just less formal. You know? At least the way I think about it off the top of my head. That's the answer.

[00:06:47] How's your Spanish?

[00:06:50] On a scale of one to ten? Honestly, five. Yeah, five. Six on a good day, but five. People tell me that it's higher than that, but I think they're just being nice. I'm pretty self-aware and I hear myself speaking Spanish, trying to express myself and I would say, from zero to ten it's probably a five. Which technically is an F for fucking sucks. Let me go back to these comments, I know there's a lot.

[00:07:24] What is facts?

[00:07:28] What is facts? Oh, okay, that's a good question. So facts is kind of like, um, I guess you could call it slang. It's just a word that we say when somebody is speaking the truth because... And you spelled it F A X, which is like an electronic device, something completely different. But facts F A C T S, facts. When somebody says that it means they're saying like, what you're saying is true and I agree. Like, that's real shit, like real talk, facts. Because you're not lying. If you're speaking facts, if what you're saying is a fact, then it's not a lie. It's not false. So that's why people say that. Like I might say, "Messi is the greatest player of all time" and you might say, "facts". And you're saying that's a fact, that's true. Right? That's not false. So that's what facts means.

[00:08:22] How do you be good at English? Practice English.

[00:08:33] Can you stop worrying about...? Oh, damn, I can't read today. How can I stop worrying about my English when I start talking to native speakers on social media?

[00:08:47] How? I don't know if this answer is going to be helpful to you, but this is just what I would do if I were you. This is what I've done. I think the subject of like learning how to be more calm or confident or secure, sure of yourself, whatever it is, especially when in public or especially when interacting with other people.

[00:09:18] Like, you know, a lot of people have a bunch of different techniques and recommendations, but what worked for me, man, is just making the simple choice to not care. Like, it's a choice that you can make. You know? You obviously can't control the thoughts that enter your mind involuntarily. Right? But you can choose to entertain them or not. And when I say entertain I mean like, give them your time, attention, and consideration. Right? Acknowledge them. You don't have to. So in a moment where you're like, feeling insecure or afraid or you're hearing these negative thoughts, you don't have to pay attention to that stuff. I know that sounds like maybe an oversimplification. Like maybe it doesn't even make sense.

[00:09:56] What I'm trying to say is like, you can choose to just not care. You can choose that. So how do you stop caring? Just fucking decide, like, I don't care. I wish I had like, a more detailed, like beautiful answer or something like that. But it really is just a conscious choice that you make to care or not care about something. So if you just, if you know that you can speak English, you can communicate, you can understand when people talk to you. Like, just say what you got to say. You know? I think you just have to stop worrying about what the consequences are going to be. That probably doesn't sound good. But what I mean is a lot of times people are nervous because they're anticipating a negative outcome. They're anticipating like, disaster. They're imagining the worst-case scenario a lot of times, and that makes them scared.

[00:10:46] So if you just choose to focus on the present moment and just communicate, or if you choose to think positive thoughts or choose to just not care at all what happens, especially when you know you have good intentions. I mean, what more can you do? That's just works for me. I don't know what to tell you, is hard to tell you how you should do something because I'm not you, you know, but that's what I did. It works for me.

[00:11:16] Somebody wants me to do a quick pronunciation exercise. So the words CAP, CUP and COP. Before I say them, I want you to think to yourself, how do you pronounce these words? C A P. How would you pronounce that? Obviously, I can't hear you, but I want you to say it out loud. I don't care if you're on the bus, I don't care if you're in the kitchen, I don't care what you're doing right now. Say it out loud. CAP. How do you pronounce that? I would pronounce it, cap. Cap is cap. Like, "no cap, bro" "stop capping, nigga.. fuck you mean". That's cap. Right? Cap, and cap. All right? So C A P is cap. Hopefully, you got that one right.

[00:12:03] Now, the next one is what? C U P, CUP. How would you pronounce that word? Again, say it out loud. One more time. C U P. How do you pronounce it? I would say, cup. So instead of "ah" like cap, we say "oh", like cup or fuck or stuck or truck or bus or but or what. Cup. Right? So CAP, Cap. CUP, cup. The last one, C O P. How would you pronounce that word? COP. I would say, cop. Cop, you know?

[00:12:53] So CAP, cap. CUP, cup. COP, cop. I block and stop and watch and pop and rock, shock, cop. Okay? So ah, uh, oh. Those are the three sounds. Hopefully that helps.

[00:13:14] Why do you know Spanish?

[00:13:17] Because some of my good friends in college were Mexican, and they were always speaking Spanish, and I got tired of being the only fucking guy in the room that couldn't understand. So I asked him to teach me Spanish one day and the rest was kind of, you know, history, as they say.

[00:13:35] Do you think that it's hard to learn Spanish?

[00:13:39] Honestly, I don't. I really don't. I think Spanish is a very simple language, and if you speak English, it's definitely the first foreign language that you should learn. Yeah, I think it's one of the... I'm not going to say it's one of the easiest languages to learn because I have no idea about the difficulty of, you know, all the languages.

[00:14:00] But, and maybe I'm just, you know, naturally like predisposed to learn languages. Maybe it would be extremely hard for other English speakers, I don't know. But in my experience, Spanish was not easy to learn. But it's a simple language, you know, so if you just practice and study, then it's not difficult because it follows very clear and consistent patterns in terms of pronunciation, verb conjugation, grammar, and things like that.

[00:14:31] The grammar was a challenge at first, for sure. You just have to get used to it. And my grammar still is not that good today, but I can make myself understood and people tell me that my grammar is okay, so. So we're talking about like, standard textbook, correct Spanish, then maybe it's difficult. I don't know because I don't know that type of Spanish, but the spoken language in general to me is not difficult. The difficulty of Spanish is understanding Spanish speakers because you talk so fucking fast. You know what I mean? Especially from certain countries. Just talk so fast. And not only that but like, different countries have different words for the same objects or feelings or situations. You know what I mean?

[00:15:12] Like, I think it was maybe it feels like a month ago, I learned the word vaina, which I guess is heavily used in the Dominican Republic. Which can be anything. The word vaina can be anything. Stuff like that. I've been speaking Spanish five years. I had never heard that word before because I never really talked to anybody from the Dominican, you know? But anyway, I said all that to say, I don't think it's too difficult. I just think the challenge is understanding all Spanish speakers from all over the world. Because Spanish is Spanish, but at the same time it definitely changes from region to region. Right? Just like any other language, I imagine, so...

[00:15:56] Turn this live in Spanish. Nope! Can't do it. Life in English.

[00:16:02] Have you done the IELTS test?

[00:16:04] No, I have not. Isn't the IELTS for people trying to prove that they can speak English? I think, I don't think English teachers take the IELTS. To be honest, I don't know. But I don't think they do. But no, I've never taken that test. I've never taken any exam to test my English level other than in public school, obviously.

[00:16:24] And there was one class that like, I fucking hated school in general, but that was one class that I just naturally did good in. Like I remember in multiple years during my schooling, my teachers, my literature teachers telling me like, that I was doing really good in the class. Like, I was a good writer and I could like, formulate and express my ideas really well. You know? That was something that came natural, but everything else certainly did not.

[00:16:48] Like, I'm terrible at math, you know. I don't even, I'm not even sure I could do like, eighth-grade level math right now. And I find myself constantly trying to do simple multiplication equations, division, and stuff like that just with money and other things and time and stuff. And can't do it. You know? You didn't ask me about that. So let me get back to these questions.

[00:17:13] What's the best way to learn English?

[00:17:19] The answer to that question is subjective because everybody's different, right? Some people prefer to learn things by doing things, like me. I like to learn by experience, I like to put my hands on it, take it apart, put it together, and play with it to see how it works. Figuratively and literally. Right? But some people like, need to watch a video of it being done, and then immediately they can just go do it. Other people if you just talk to them and they just hear and they can learn that way. Other people need to read their instructions or their lesson or whatever it is. So everybody's different. Some people will prefer to listen to podcasts, other people will prefer TV series, some people prefer music or the news or talking to real people. You know?

[00:18:04] So what's the best way? I don't know if there is one best way. I would say the most effective thing you can be doing, though, is talking to real people. You know? Everybody does all that other stuff. Podcasts, movies, books, series, music, etc. But the most effective way to improve your listening and speaking skills is listening and talking to a human being. So if I had to choose, I would say that's the best way.

[00:18:32] Will ever I be fluent in English like you? What is my hope there?

[00:18:44] Will you ever be fluent in English like me? I don't know what you mean by that. So I can't really answer that part of your question. But I mean, I understand that you're asking, will you ever get to a high level of English. Like native level? I mean, it's my first language, bro. So I don't know if you're saying, will you ever speak it as if you were born speaking it? I don't know. I mean, it's definitely possible. People do it all the time. I've never done it.

[00:19:10] So, and to be honest, I don't know if that should be your focus. I don't think your goal when learning to speak a foreign language should be speaking it as if you have been speaking it since you were born. I don't think the goal should be to speak it exactly like you speak your first language. I mean, that's such a difficult thing to achieve. You know what I mean? So it's like if you're always... I mean, I guess if you want to shoot for the stars or whatever, then yeah, that's cool. But a lot of times you might just be setting yourself up or, in other words, preparing yourself for disappointment. You know? Because you're never or it's going to take so long to reach that goal, generally speaking, for most people, that you might start to feel demotivated. Like, "man, it's never going to be perfect". And then you start to lose hope.

[00:19:58] So I think a much more realistic, attainable goal is to be conversational. To be able to sit down with almost anybody and have a conversation. Or go to almost any English-speaking country and be able to survive and communicate. That should be the goal. Because once you get to that place, you can talk to anybody and then everything that comes after that, it's just like a bonus. It's extra. You never stop learning new words, expressions or getting exposed to different accents. Not just the language itself but the culture that's influencing that language, you learn about that stuff too. You know?

[00:20:34] So I think you should focus much more on that, man. Not being perfect or speaking just like me, but being conversational. Because if you're conversational, that means that you have mastered the fundamentals, which is always the most important part of anything that you're doing. So master the fundamentals and then just kind of build on top of that, understanding that it's going to take time. But the more effort you put in, the better the results you get out. So it's really up to you. So is there any hope? I don't know. You tell me. You know, another question I have, bro.

[00:21:05] And I was thinking, like before I started recording is when I was thinking about Christmas is around the corner as well as my birthday is next month and stuff like that, and I was thinking about why do people celebrate? Why do people exchange gifts on Christmas and stuff? And after hearing myself speak, just in case you don't understand, when I say Christmas is around the corner, that's an expression that means like, it's very close. It's going to happen very soon.

[00:21:30] So I was thinking about all that and birthdays and stuff, and it made me ask myself like, why do people fear getting older? Have you ever asked yourself that question? Like, why do people... Why are they so afraid of getting older? And you see it all around the world and I think with men and women. You know? People who are like afraid of getting wrinkles in their face or their body not functioning like it once did. All that type of stuff, getting sick, dying, and things like that. Not looking as physically attractive as you did when you were 21 or 30 or whatever.

[00:22:06] Why do you think people are so afraid of getting old? And do you think it's just the physical aspect of getting old that people are uncomfortable with? Because when you think about the emotional or the, let's say, intellectual for lack of a better word, the spiritual aspects of getting older like, it's a net positive, in my opinion. Hopefully, as you get older you get wiser. Like, you have more life experiences and you're learning from those experiences and you're applying that newfound knowledge to, you know, your future or the next experiences, however you say it. And you're learning and you're getting better. You're constantly becoming a better, smarter, more evolved, and optimized version of yourself as you get older.

[00:22:53] Because when you're young, bro, you're fucking 14, 18, 21. I mean, even 25 or 30, in some cases. It's like, you don't know shit bro, you're dumb as hell. Don't really have the experience that you need to be the person that you should be. So and maybe that doesn't make sense. But what I'm saying is like typically, generally speaking, the younger the people are like, the less experienced they are. Which means the less wise they are, which means the less than optimal choices they make. You know what I'm saying?

[00:23:25] So I think getting older like you get wiser, you get smarter and you learn how to live better in a way that's better for you. You learn how to be yourself, or more of yourself. You know what I mean? Getting older is the shit. Obviously, it comes with responsibility, but you know, that's just life. So being like young and dumb is fun, I guess. But I think being old and smart is pretty fucking cool, too. What do you guys think?

[00:23:54] It's fun. Like, when we are kids we want to be grown. And when we get old, people want to go back.

[00:24:00] Yeah, absolutely, man. It's like the classic experience for a lot of people when we're young, we want to be grown and have independence and just do what we want and, you know, all that type of stuff. Because we don't really know, most of the time nobody explains to us that what we imagine as life as an adult is just a small piece of the entire pie. You know? It comes with a lot more responsibility and freedom, which also comes with responsibility. Like, we imagine the freedom that adults have, but we don't understand that you cannot separate freedom from responsibility. You know?

[00:24:36] So I think that's why as kids, we want so badly to be adults. And then as adults like, I don't necessarily I want to be a kid anymore. It's not like I want to go back to my childhood. Yeah, to be honest, I don't think I would if I had the chance, if I could just go back to being the kid, I don't even think I would. I would prefer to like, learn how to take the best aspects of what it meant to be a kid and integrate them into my adult life. I would prefer to do that. You know? But you're right, a lot of people do feel that way. I don't know. I just don't understand why people fear getting older. I don't know if it's the fear of losing your physical attractiveness, I don't know if it's the fear of death itself. If it's the fear of sickness or what exactly. I don't know.

[00:25:33] Which makes me think of a really, really interesting idea that a friend of mine told me a couple of years ago when we were talking about life after death and reincarnation and things like that. And what she believes is that reincarnation is real, but it's not based on how good or how bad of a person you are during your life. That's not what determines what you will be in the next life. For example, if you're just a saint, an amazing person in the next life, you'll have higher social status, more fortune, more money, or whatever it is. Your life isn't going to be better for that reason. Or if you're just a piece of shit and you're an asshole, you're not going to be born as somebody like anus or something like that. Or you're not going to be poor and broke and miserable in your next life. She doesn't believe that's how it works.

[00:26:21] She believes that reincarnation is based on how many and how well, how many lessons and how well you learned them during your life. So how many life lessons you can manage to learn doing your life. Because during your entire lifetime life is throwing these situations at you and you have a chance to learn something from every experience, right? So she believes based on how you learn your life lessons or if you learn them, that will determine the quality of your next life.

[00:26:52] So if you go through life learning the lessons that you're supposed to learn, you're paying attention, you're trying to evolve and grow. Your next life will not be better. It will be easier to accomplish the things that you want to accomplish because you learned the lessons that you needed to learn in your past life, which sets you up for the next one.

[00:27:08] Now, if you go through life just refusing to learn, the lessons that life or God or the universe or whatever, however you see it, whatever you want to call it. Let's just call it life. If you refuse to learn those lessons like, your next life is going to be even harder because you refused to learn the things that you needed to learn before you went on to your next life. And then it just creates this positive or negative feedback loop. And that's how she thinks reincarnation works.

[00:27:34] And ever since she shared that idea with me, like, I've never stopped thinking about it. And I think I became, like, more attentive to that idea and like trying to put more attention on whether or not I'm learning the lessons I'm supposed to be learning from the experiences that I'm having. You know? It's an interesting idea. What do you guys think? Do you guys believe in reincarnation? Life after death? What do you guys think?

[00:28:04] Bro, you're 26 years old, you're already worried about being an adult?

[00:28:14] I don't understand the question, actually. It's a good question. Or it's a curious question, but I don't really understand what you mean. Like, 26 is too young to be thinking about my adult life? I completely disagree. I completely disagree. And maybe I'm, I guess I understand what you're trying to say, which is like, "Man, enjoy your life, you're young. You don't have to worry about this, that and the third". And I never said that I was worried about being an adult, first of all. So I don't know when you heard that because I never said that. But second of all, I guess what you're trying to say is like, "Enjoy your life while you're young. 26 is young". I totally agree, but that doesn't mean that you can't be thinking about your adult life. Like, where you want your life to go, if you don't think about it, then what the fuck are you going to do? You're just going to let life happen to you? I don't know. I just, I see things differently. Obviously, we might have a difference of opinion, but I just see it differently.

[00:29:13] I think we don't get taught to think about our adult lives early enough. Or we get taught to think about the wrong aspects of our adult life or we get taught to think about it in the wrong way, as if it's just responsibility, responsibility, bills go to school, get a job, have a family, raise that family, get sick and die. And that's why I think people are so afraid of it. You know? Either because it's all unknown and they don't know what to do or all they see is misery and bills and taxes and a job that they hate because they can't make a living doing what they want, because everybody told them it was impossible, that type of shit. You know what I'm saying? But you don't have to think about it that way.

[00:29:50] I think if, it depends on how you teach the kid as well. Like, as a child, you can teach them about tax laws and philosophy and human psychology, you just have to break it down into little pieces that they can consume and still get the idea. You know? So you can teach kids to think about their life as an adult, what they want to do with their lives without making it too serious or too heavy, or too dramatic. And give them the tools and the mindset and way of thinking that they need so that when they finally decide or find out what they want to do with their adult life, they have the mental capacity and resources to get it done as opposed to just being young and dumb and having fun until you're 35 and then saying, "okay, let me get serious about life". I'm sure that works for somebody, but it doesn't work for me, you know. So I guess it's just two different ways of seeing it. And again, I didn't understand your question and I responded anyway. So forgive me if I took it out of context or misunderstood it, but that's what I think.

[00:30:49] Could you explain different ways to say "I like you"?

[00:30:57] That's a good question. Different ways to say "I like you". I've never thought about that. I mean, I guess like, if I were to say it, depending on where I was, obviously, but like where I grew up, where I went to high school, for example, where I live right now. We would probably say, "I fuck with you". And when I say 'we', I'm talking about like, people that I hang out with or people like me. It's kind of like, when I say "I fuck with you", that's kind of like Ebonics or what some people know as like, "black English" or AAVE. There's different names for it. But that's not like a standard English expression. That's just like how we talk where I'm from or like how a lot of black people talk.

[00:31:44] So if I say I fuck with you, it means not only do I like you, but like, you have my respect, I think you're cool. You know, like we could be friends or we are friends, that type of thing. If I don't fuck with you, it means I don't like you, I don't respect you, I don't want to be near you, I don't want to hang out with you, or nothing like that. So if I do fuck with you, obviously that's the opposite, the positive version of that. So I would say don't use that like at work with somebody you don't know. Do not write that in the email. It's extremely informal. Some people might not even understand it because "to fuck with you" also has a different meaning in a different context. And that's a universal phrase.

[00:32:19] So I'm probably confusing you at this point. But that's one way to say "I like you, I respect you, I think you're cool". I fuck with you. But it's extremely informal, and most people consider it slang, but it's really just a different dialect to English. So something standard, another way to say I like you. I think you're cool. I really don't know another way to say I like you. I would just say, "I like you". Or "you're cool" or something like that. I guess you're cool is a decent way to say I like you. Or I guess you could say it without saying it like, I enjoy your company. I like being around you. I enjoy your presence. I enjoy spending time with you. You're fun to be around or something like that. I mean, I really don't know another way to say I like you, but maybe some of those might be helpful to you. All right.

[00:33:19] Alo Sandoval says, "I guess that's better understand the English, because if you translate just the phrase or something..." Did she write more? Hang on. Maybe she wrote more. "A lot of time you're missing the context if you only translate".

[00:33:42] That's exactly right, and you basically expressed it a hundred times better than I ever could. That's what I was trying to say. I just couldn't find the words. So thank you for that. Because that's really what I was trying to express, is that when you're always translating you're ignoring the fact that context determines the meaning of the phrase. Right? And culture and a lot of times context and culture go hand in hand, but without those things, it's just words. And it can be interpreted in many different ways, depending on the context or culture. So that's exactly right. That's why it's better to just understand it. And it's better just to learn how to learn.

[00:34:20] A lot of times we like, you can't think about language like math or science where 1+1 is 2, sometimes one 1+1 is 17, and it makes perfect sense. When speaking about language. Right? It makes perfect sense. Again, I could say, "I don't fuck with you". Like, literally in the 1+1= 2 way of thinking, it doesn't even make sense. I don't fuck with you. It's like that means I don't have sex with you. Or we don't have sex together with somebody else. It doesn't make literal sense. I don't fuck with you. Because "to fuck", the verb has many meanings. But like to have sex, if I don't fuck with you, it means that we don't fuck together. It doesn't make sense. But in the 1+1 is 17 way of thinking. Right? Which is the way you should be thinking about language, makes perfect sense to me. But to somebody else it doesn't, and that's the point. It's 1+1 is not always 2 when you're thinking about language, which is why just translating all the time is slowing you down. You're not going to become fluent doing that for the rest of your life. You know?

[00:35:28] Can you explain when to use problem and issue?

[00:35:30] Problem and issue are the same exact thing. "Issue" is just a more formal way of saying "problem". So I guess you can use the word issue at work, in emails, and stuff like that. Or if you, you know, I guess, the word "problem" sounds worse, it has a little bit more of a negative connotation than issue. Because the issue is something that can be resolved, there's a solution. A problem is like, "fuck, we've got a problem". Just in terms of the way the words feel to me. I don't know if that makes sense. But they're the same thing. Problem, issue, informal, formal. That's it. So let me take one last look at these questions and comments before I get up out of here.

[00:36:11] *Reading in Spanish*.

[00:36:19] How can you refer... Different ways you can refer to somebody as friend.

[00:36:30] I think it depends on where you're from, what your culture is, and if you're referring to a man or a woman. So I'm going to try to think of some good examples. So I could say if we're talking about a guy my age, I could say, "that's my friend" and that's universal. I can say, "that's my partner" which is, like here in the south we say partner, but it's the word "partner". If I pronounce it that way, you'll probably understand P A R T N E R. But in the South, a lot of people say "partner", it's just a different way of pronouncing the word.

[00:37:09] So if I say, "that's my partner right there", that's my friend. Or I could say "homie" H O M I E, "that's my homie right there". And now partner and homie are considered very informal words. You know? But if you think about the meaning of the word, it just means friend. That's my friend. That's my partner. That's my homie. That's my boy. You know? So again, if you're referring to a guy, "that's my boy right there" that's my friend. You know, we're close. That's my boy. That's my partner. That's my homie. You know what I'm saying? I'm trying to think of some other ones.

[00:37:41] Now this, I'm going to tell you this, but I do not recommend you say this. I just want you to know what it means if I say, "that's my nigga", that also can mean that's my friend, that's my boy, that's my homie. I fuck with him. Going back to that same phrase. I fuck with him. That's my nigga. That's my homie. You know? That's really what it means. So again, I do not recommend you say that. Please, I mean, you say whatever you want, I'm not going to tell you what to say, I don't believe in that type of thing. I'm just saying, the word "nigga" for a lot of people is very, very, very offensive, to black people I mean, it's very offensive if it's being said to them by somebody that's not black.

[00:38:23] Now, this is a very complex and deep subject, so I won't get into it now. I want to stay on topic. But just so, you know, if I say "that's my nigga" I mean that's my friend. And typically I'm talking about a guy, not a girl. I can say "that girl is my nigga". Sometimes we say that, but most of the time it's a guy. Now, words for... I'm trying to think of words that we use for girls. In this case, I would just say friend. I don't know what other girls refer to their girlfriends as. They probably say, "My friend. That's my girl". Just like we say, "that's my boy". They would say that's my girl. Or "my homegirl", I guess some girls might say that. I don't really hear it too often, though. But a lot of girls in my experience, especially like my age range, like 18 to 35, they might say, "that's my girl, that's my friend".

[00:39:09] I can't really think of a bunch of other words that we use for that. Now something much more formal it's like "colleague", which is technically not a friend. But, you know, a colleague is somebody that you interact with on a regular basis, it could be at work or something like that. Most of the time it's at work. A colleague is somebody that you work with. That's not necessarily your friend. Now you could also say "associate", which again, is not a friend. It's kind of like something less than a friend, but I'm just trying to give you more formal words that aren't necessarily "friend". Because a friend is somebody that's close, that you trust, have a good time with, you have fun with them, you just want to spend time with them. Now an associate is somebody with whom you associate. You're not necessarily friends, but you have to do business with this person or interact with this person for whatever reason. So it's an associate. Those are some words that either mean friend or are related to the word friend. Hopefully, that was helpful.

[00:40:07] Okay. HK368 says he or she, I'm not sure, doesn't understand the body count question. So just in case you don't understand or even know what I'm talking about, the body count question obviously is a question about your body count. So, a body count depending on the context, but in most cases, especially on social media, like what most people mean when they say body count is how many people you've had sex with. That's it. How many bodies you have had sexual relations with or sexual interactions with. Right? So somebody says, "what's your body count?" they're asking you "how many people have you had sex with?". That's it. Now, in a different context, body count means how many people you've killed. So context is everything.

[00:40:58] What is the most important to talk well English?

[00:41:04] To talk, I say it every time. Like, maybe you've never heard me say it before. But if you've been following me for at least a month, you've heard me say it before for sure. It's the best way to speak English well or to learn to speak English well is to speak English, bro. That's it. That's it. So you need to find a teacher or a language exchange partner or a friend or whatever you need to do, a human being that can tell you when you're saying something that sounds weird or that's grammatically incorrect or teach you about the language, the culture, the expressions, help you with your pronunciation, all the type of stuff. But you can't do that if you're not talking to a real person.

[00:41:44] So find a real person and talk to them. Everything else is helpful, but it's secondary in comparison to the talking part. Like, if I asked you, "how do you learn to play soccer?". What would you say? If I asked you, "how do you learn to play saxophone?". What would you say? Practice, right? Take classes or a course, watch videos, and you fucking practice until you're good.

[00:42:10] And you get better by being around people that are better than you. You become a better soccer player by playing with players that play better than you. Not people on the same level or people that don't play as good as you. How could you possibly get better? It's people that are better than you that push you, that force you to become a better version of yourself or to do that skill or to improve that skill. Let's say, that's a better way of saying it, right? So it's the same with everything else.

[00:42:36] If you want to be a great musician, you have to be around musicians greater than you. Naturally, you're going to get inspired and notice their techniques and, you know, take those things and make them your own. It's the same thing with language. So if we're talking about language, English, in this case, if you want to be a better English speaker, speak English to people that speak English better than you. Most of the time, not always, but most of the time that's a native.

[00:43:00] But I should also say you don't need a native to become fluent in English. Somebody who speaks English very well can also teach you, even if it's their second, third, or fourteenth language, it doesn't really matter. So I think you should leave that idea to the side too if you have that in your head. Anybody who speaks English better than you can help you improve your English. So by being around and interacting with people who have a higher skill level than you in this case, English, you're going to improve your English. All right, cool.

[00:43:32] All right y'all, so I'm about to get out of here, man. My plan was to be here for an hour and it's been two. So hopefully y'all enjoyed the live. Maybe you learned some few... some few things?! Maybe you learned a few things or got some things to think about. You know? But thank you for being here. Thank you for your time and attention because you could have given it to anybody, but you gave it to me. So I appreciate it.

[00:43:53] Hopefully, you got the value from the live. I'm going to try to do it again, I'm going to say next Friday, I'm going to try to do it again around the same time another live stream. I can't say for sure yet, but I'm gonna try. All right. But one thing is for sure, I'll be back. All right? So what's today, Thursday? Right? Yeah, it's Thursday. So y'all have a great rest of your day or your night, Friday as well. You know what I'm saying? And hopefully, you enjoy the weekend. More videos coming soon, more lessons, more podcasts, man. I'ma holler at y'all real soon. Y'all stay safe. Take care of yourselves. And I see you when I see you. Peace!

[END OF EPISODE]

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