#140 - Americans Are So Fucking Stupid

June 26, 2022

I've met so many people who see the United States as nothing more than a country full of arrogant, uneducated, money-hungry capitalists. What I find interesting is that most who have an opinion about the U.S. have never even set foot in the country nor spoken to an American citizen. So this episode is an attempt to put things in perspective.

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[00:00:00] Americans are so dumb. Americans are so uneducated. Americans are so arrogant. Americans think they're the center of the universe and everything revolves around them. Why don't Americans know where Kazakhstan is? Why don't Americans know that Brazilians don't speak Spanish? Why don't Americans know what's going on outside of the U.S.? And why the fuck do Americans call themselves Americans when we're all Americans? I've been hearing comments and questions like these on a regular basis since I started teaching English back in 2018. So many people harbor so much anger, disdain, and resentment for America. They resent Americans for acting like the U.S. as the most important country on the planet. Now, what I find most interesting, though, is that 99% of the time, when an American shows that he or she doesn't know something about a foreign country or that they simply have a misconception about another country, people from other countries choose to get angry, judgmental, and condescending, as if they don't have any misconceptions about countries they've never been to. "Look at that fucking stupid American. He thinks we all live in the dirt and don't have electricity? Arrogant piece of shit American. She thinks her language is difficult? Try learning French, asshole!" Now I understand, people are extremely sensitive, especially these days. Many of us live in a clickbait, headline-reading, "speak before you think" type of world. So when someone sees something they don't like or agree with, their natural reaction is to get offended and tell the world what they're thinking in the comment section of a complete stranger's video.

[00:01:44] I don't condone this type of behavior, but I understand it. But what you have to understand about the United States of America is that most people in this country do not give a single fuck about you, your country, your language, or the resentment in your heart. This isn't because we think other countries are less important or inferior. It's because we're simply not exposed to life outside the U.S. And I say we for the sake of simplicity, this is, of course, just my opinion. I do not and I cannot speak for all 330 million Americans. So, let's continue. Let's talk about public school. In the U.S. in my experience, in public school, we're taught about things like how to read and write in English, literature, algebra, geometry, calculus, sciences like biology and chemistry, physical education like sports and fitness, the robotic basics of a foreign language, and something called social studies, which covers history and geography. But here's the thing - we're taught about the history and the geography of the United States of America. Not Brazil, not Russia, not Vietnam. not Tanzania, not Scotland. The United States of America. That's why Americans don't really know which languages people speak in Eritrea. That's why Americans don't know that Turkey is a very interesting place because it's technically both an Asian and a European country. That's why Americans think that everyone who speaks Spanish is Mexican.

[00:03:18] That's why Americans don't know what life outside the U.S. is really like. It's because the only exposure we get to life outside of our country is one of those commercials with sad music and a starving kid sitting in the dirt somewhere in Africa trying to convince you that donating just $0.35 a day will feed that starving child. That's why even today, people think that's what life is like for everybody in Africa. And even though we've got people from all over the world living and working here, most Americans don't know anything about different languages and cultures. And in my opinion, that's because although the U.S. is an incredibly diverse country, ethnically speaking, we're still very divided in many ways. It's hard to generalize, but many people here tend to hang out with people they identify with. And due to the history of this country, people tend to identify with people that look and sound like them. And maybe that's human nature. But if that's the case, I think the history of segregation in this country exacerbated that problem and created a lot of barriers that keep us from understanding and appreciating people and cultures different from our own. So think about it. If from the time you're born, you're taught to stick with your own; if you grow up in a neighborhood that isn't multicultural, and you're taught that everyone or anyone who doesn't look or sound like you is the enemy,

[00:04:44] then you probably wouldn't ever feel motivated to get to know someone of a different ethnic or cultural background. You probably would take whatever you see on TV and use that as a representation of the people you know nothing about and you've never even interacted with. And to take it a step further, you'd be looking through the lens of your misconceptions when trying to interpret the behavior of those people, only further reinforcing the ignorant misconceptions you have. And let me remind you, everyone does that, not just Americans. We're all emotional creatures with faulty logic that just want to feel like we understand things and that we're in control. But getting back to the Americans, these stupid, ungrateful, arrogant, racist pieces of shit. Many Americans don't know much about other countries because we're never really encouraged to. Most Americans don't travel internationally. Most Americans don't speak more than one language, right? Most Americans are uneducated about all kinds of things like finance, tax laws, investments, the judicial system, politics, health care, business, psychology. I mean, the list goes on and on. Many of us don't know shit about our own country, so it would be unreasonable to expect us to know something about any other country. From the time we were little kids until the day we die, we're being told that America is the greatest country on the planet. We're taught to be proud to be Americans.

Lee Greenwood (God Bless the USA song plays): [00:06:19] If tomorrow all the things were gone, I'd worked for all my life. And I had to start again, with just my children and my wife. I'd thank my lucky stars to be living here today. 'Cause the flag still stands for freedom and they can't take that away. And I'm proud to be an American where at least I know I'm free. And I won't forget the men who died, who gave that right to me. And I gladly stand up, next to you and defend her still today. 'Cause there ain't no doubt I love this land, God bless the USA.

[00:07:28] We are always consuming America. Where is Hollywood - the heart of the film industry? In the United States of America. Where's the heart of the mainstream music industry? In the United States of America. What do we see on the news? Shit that's happening in the United States of America. What books are most of us reading? Books written in English by people from the United States of America. To what flag are we expected to pledge allegiance every single morning before school starts? The flag of the United States of America. I genuinely do not believe that most Americans harbor hatred for people from other countries or they think they're inferior in some way. I think most Americans don't know and have no reason to care about people from other countries. It's hard to care about something if you don't know it exists. The same way I imagine a gorilla born in captivity doesn't dream of a rainforest in the Congo. I mean, how could it dream about or want to get to a place if it doesn't know it exists? And maybe that doesn't make sense. My point is, if you're born in this box and all you've known since the day you were born is that box, and everybody in the box is telling you this is the greatest box to ever exist, this is the only box that exists, I doubt you would spend your days dreaming about another box if you'd never even had any idea or a clue or indication that there are hundreds of boxes that you could explore and get to know.

[00:09:03] You know, I just can't see how you would naturally think about all those other boxes. You just...you don't know they exist. Right? Hopefully that makes sense. Now, another topic of discussion that's really starting to get old is the idea that people from the U.S. shouldn't refer to themselves as Americans because America is a continent. So everyone from Canada all the way down to Argentina is an American. But let me make this clear for anyone who holds this opinion, we call ourselves Americans because the name of our country is the United States of America. That's literally the reason. So my question to you would be what should we call ourselves if not "Americans"? And the answer I always get is something like "United Stadians". That sounds extremely awkward and it also doesn't really make much sense. And, you know, I recently learned that the official name of Mexico is Los Estados Unidos Mexicanos or the United Mexican States. And what do people from Mexico call themselves? Mexicanos, right? They don't refer to themselves as Estado Mexicanos. Now, Mexico is a part of North America. But Mexicans aren't North Americans, right? They're Latin Americans. And by the way, what do most people in Latin America call people from the U.S.? Los Americanos. Os Americanos, right? The only people out here using the word "estadounidense" are people who don't appreciate the fact that we call ourselves Americans.

[00:10:42] Now, don't get me wrong, I know and understand that the word "estadounidense" is the correct word to use in Spanish or Portuguese, but that word simply doesn't exist in English. It's nothing personal, bro. I promise. The ironic thing about all of this is that people complain about Americans being uneducated and ignorant all the time and then they arrogantly talk down on Americans whenever we say something out of ignorance. It's as if some people really think that they know everything there is to know about the US and its people, and Americans have no clue what's going on in other countries. And that somehow makes them better than Americans. But I'd like to put things in perspective and remind you that just because you watch the news and see things about our country on social media doesn't mean that you know something about that country. If you haven't been there and talked to hundreds of people, thousands of people from different walks of life, then you really don't know anything. You simply know what you've heard. It's as if some people are upset because the entire world has its eyes on the U.S. for one reason or another. And they're upset because no one is paying attention to them. The whole thing to me is just a little irrational. But what's my point here? My point is the remedy to ignorance is education, not arrogance.

[00:12:07] The idea that you can get mad and disrespect an individual simply because he or she doesn't know something is pretty fucking childish and counterproductive, if you ask me. If you really cared about cultural understanding and education, you would take the time to educate people when they say something ignorant. You wouldn't respond with anger, resentment, and negativity because those things only generate more anger, resentment, and negativity. I guess what I have a hard time understanding is how you could be offended by a question. I have a hard time understanding how you could be offended by someone's opinion. I have a hard time understanding how you could be offended by someone's ignorance. Like, just stop and imagine for a minute - if your parents or your teachers got mad and disrespectful with you every time you didn't know something that they knew, it'd be pretty fucking ridiculous, right? So why is it that so many people choose to react that way to Americans? Actually, it's not even that - people react that way to anyone they see as different. Anyone who has an opposing opinion or an alternative lifestyle. Everyone is so quick to judge, condescend, talk shit, criticize, ridicule, embarrass and cancel anyone who lives or thinks differently from them. This has to stop. Instead of arrogance, choose humility. Instead of resentment, choose calmness. Instead of judgment, choose curiosity. And instead of ignorance, choose education. Peace!

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[00:00:00] Americans are so dumb. Americans are so uneducated. Americans are so arrogant. Americans think they're the center of the universe and everything revolves around them. Why don't Americans know where Kazakhstan is? Why don't Americans know that Brazilians don't speak Spanish? Why don't Americans know what's going on outside of the U.S.? And why the fuck do Americans call themselves Americans when we're all Americans? I've been hearing comments and questions like these on a regular basis since I started teaching English back in 2018. So many people harbor so much anger, disdain, and resentment for America. They resent Americans for acting like the U.S. as the most important country on the planet. Now, what I find most interesting, though, is that 99% of the time, when an American shows that he or she doesn't know something about a foreign country or that they simply have a misconception about another country, people from other countries choose to get angry, judgmental, and condescending, as if they don't have any misconceptions about countries they've never been to. "Look at that fucking stupid American. He thinks we all live in the dirt and don't have electricity? Arrogant piece of shit American. She thinks her language is difficult? Try learning French, asshole!" Now I understand, people are extremely sensitive, especially these days. Many of us live in a clickbait, headline-reading, "speak before you think" type of world. So when someone sees something they don't like or agree with, their natural reaction is to get offended and tell the world what they're thinking in the comment section of a complete stranger's video.

[00:01:44] I don't condone this type of behavior, but I understand it. But what you have to understand about the United States of America is that most people in this country do not give a single fuck about you, your country, your language, or the resentment in your heart. This isn't because we think other countries are less important or inferior. It's because we're simply not exposed to life outside the U.S. And I say we for the sake of simplicity, this is, of course, just my opinion. I do not and I cannot speak for all 330 million Americans. So, let's continue. Let's talk about public school. In the U.S. in my experience, in public school, we're taught about things like how to read and write in English, literature, algebra, geometry, calculus, sciences like biology and chemistry, physical education like sports and fitness, the robotic basics of a foreign language, and something called social studies, which covers history and geography. But here's the thing - we're taught about the history and the geography of the United States of America. Not Brazil, not Russia, not Vietnam. not Tanzania, not Scotland. The United States of America. That's why Americans don't really know which languages people speak in Eritrea. That's why Americans don't know that Turkey is a very interesting place because it's technically both an Asian and a European country. That's why Americans think that everyone who speaks Spanish is Mexican.

[00:03:18] That's why Americans don't know what life outside the U.S. is really like. It's because the only exposure we get to life outside of our country is one of those commercials with sad music and a starving kid sitting in the dirt somewhere in Africa trying to convince you that donating just $0.35 a day will feed that starving child. That's why even today, people think that's what life is like for everybody in Africa. And even though we've got people from all over the world living and working here, most Americans don't know anything about different languages and cultures. And in my opinion, that's because although the U.S. is an incredibly diverse country, ethnically speaking, we're still very divided in many ways. It's hard to generalize, but many people here tend to hang out with people they identify with. And due to the history of this country, people tend to identify with people that look and sound like them. And maybe that's human nature. But if that's the case, I think the history of segregation in this country exacerbated that problem and created a lot of barriers that keep us from understanding and appreciating people and cultures different from our own. So think about it. If from the time you're born, you're taught to stick with your own; if you grow up in a neighborhood that isn't multicultural, and you're taught that everyone or anyone who doesn't look or sound like you is the enemy,

[00:04:44] then you probably wouldn't ever feel motivated to get to know someone of a different ethnic or cultural background. You probably would take whatever you see on TV and use that as a representation of the people you know nothing about and you've never even interacted with. And to take it a step further, you'd be looking through the lens of your misconceptions when trying to interpret the behavior of those people, only further reinforcing the ignorant misconceptions you have. And let me remind you, everyone does that, not just Americans. We're all emotional creatures with faulty logic that just want to feel like we understand things and that we're in control. But getting back to the Americans, these stupid, ungrateful, arrogant, racist pieces of shit. Many Americans don't know much about other countries because we're never really encouraged to. Most Americans don't travel internationally. Most Americans don't speak more than one language, right? Most Americans are uneducated about all kinds of things like finance, tax laws, investments, the judicial system, politics, health care, business, psychology. I mean, the list goes on and on. Many of us don't know shit about our own country, so it would be unreasonable to expect us to know something about any other country. From the time we were little kids until the day we die, we're being told that America is the greatest country on the planet. We're taught to be proud to be Americans.

Lee Greenwood (God Bless the USA song plays): [00:06:19] If tomorrow all the things were gone, I'd worked for all my life. And I had to start again, with just my children and my wife. I'd thank my lucky stars to be living here today. 'Cause the flag still stands for freedom and they can't take that away. And I'm proud to be an American where at least I know I'm free. And I won't forget the men who died, who gave that right to me. And I gladly stand up, next to you and defend her still today. 'Cause there ain't no doubt I love this land, God bless the USA.

[00:07:28] We are always consuming America. Where is Hollywood - the heart of the film industry? In the United States of America. Where's the heart of the mainstream music industry? In the United States of America. What do we see on the news? Shit that's happening in the United States of America. What books are most of us reading? Books written in English by people from the United States of America. To what flag are we expected to pledge allegiance every single morning before school starts? The flag of the United States of America. I genuinely do not believe that most Americans harbor hatred for people from other countries or they think they're inferior in some way. I think most Americans don't know and have no reason to care about people from other countries. It's hard to care about something if you don't know it exists. The same way I imagine a gorilla born in captivity doesn't dream of a rainforest in the Congo. I mean, how could it dream about or want to get to a place if it doesn't know it exists? And maybe that doesn't make sense. My point is, if you're born in this box and all you've known since the day you were born is that box, and everybody in the box is telling you this is the greatest box to ever exist, this is the only box that exists, I doubt you would spend your days dreaming about another box if you'd never even had any idea or a clue or indication that there are hundreds of boxes that you could explore and get to know.

[00:09:03] You know, I just can't see how you would naturally think about all those other boxes. You just...you don't know they exist. Right? Hopefully that makes sense. Now, another topic of discussion that's really starting to get old is the idea that people from the U.S. shouldn't refer to themselves as Americans because America is a continent. So everyone from Canada all the way down to Argentina is an American. But let me make this clear for anyone who holds this opinion, we call ourselves Americans because the name of our country is the United States of America. That's literally the reason. So my question to you would be what should we call ourselves if not "Americans"? And the answer I always get is something like "United Stadians". That sounds extremely awkward and it also doesn't really make much sense. And, you know, I recently learned that the official name of Mexico is Los Estados Unidos Mexicanos or the United Mexican States. And what do people from Mexico call themselves? Mexicanos, right? They don't refer to themselves as Estado Mexicanos. Now, Mexico is a part of North America. But Mexicans aren't North Americans, right? They're Latin Americans. And by the way, what do most people in Latin America call people from the U.S.? Los Americanos. Os Americanos, right? The only people out here using the word "estadounidense" are people who don't appreciate the fact that we call ourselves Americans.

[00:10:42] Now, don't get me wrong, I know and understand that the word "estadounidense" is the correct word to use in Spanish or Portuguese, but that word simply doesn't exist in English. It's nothing personal, bro. I promise. The ironic thing about all of this is that people complain about Americans being uneducated and ignorant all the time and then they arrogantly talk down on Americans whenever we say something out of ignorance. It's as if some people really think that they know everything there is to know about the US and its people, and Americans have no clue what's going on in other countries. And that somehow makes them better than Americans. But I'd like to put things in perspective and remind you that just because you watch the news and see things about our country on social media doesn't mean that you know something about that country. If you haven't been there and talked to hundreds of people, thousands of people from different walks of life, then you really don't know anything. You simply know what you've heard. It's as if some people are upset because the entire world has its eyes on the U.S. for one reason or another. And they're upset because no one is paying attention to them. The whole thing to me is just a little irrational. But what's my point here? My point is the remedy to ignorance is education, not arrogance.

[00:12:07] The idea that you can get mad and disrespect an individual simply because he or she doesn't know something is pretty fucking childish and counterproductive, if you ask me. If you really cared about cultural understanding and education, you would take the time to educate people when they say something ignorant. You wouldn't respond with anger, resentment, and negativity because those things only generate more anger, resentment, and negativity. I guess what I have a hard time understanding is how you could be offended by a question. I have a hard time understanding how you could be offended by someone's opinion. I have a hard time understanding how you could be offended by someone's ignorance. Like, just stop and imagine for a minute - if your parents or your teachers got mad and disrespectful with you every time you didn't know something that they knew, it'd be pretty fucking ridiculous, right? So why is it that so many people choose to react that way to Americans? Actually, it's not even that - people react that way to anyone they see as different. Anyone who has an opposing opinion or an alternative lifestyle. Everyone is so quick to judge, condescend, talk shit, criticize, ridicule, embarrass and cancel anyone who lives or thinks differently from them. This has to stop. Instead of arrogance, choose humility. Instead of resentment, choose calmness. Instead of judgment, choose curiosity. And instead of ignorance, choose education. Peace!

Writing prompts

  • What comes to mind when you think of American culture?
  • Do you agree or disagree with what Tony said? Why or why not?
  • Do you think the country you're born in has an effect on your personality?
  • What characteristics do you think are unique to American people?
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Key Vocabulary Guide

Transcript

[00:00:00] Americans are so dumb. Americans are so uneducated. Americans are so arrogant. Americans think they're the center of the universe and everything revolves around them. Why don't Americans know where Kazakhstan is? Why don't Americans know that Brazilians don't speak Spanish? Why don't Americans know what's going on outside of the U.S.? And why the fuck do Americans call themselves Americans when we're all Americans? I've been hearing comments and questions like these on a regular basis since I started teaching English back in 2018. So many people harbor so much anger, disdain, and resentment for America. They resent Americans for acting like the U.S. as the most important country on the planet. Now, what I find most interesting, though, is that 99% of the time, when an American shows that he or she doesn't know something about a foreign country or that they simply have a misconception about another country, people from other countries choose to get angry, judgmental, and condescending, as if they don't have any misconceptions about countries they've never been to. "Look at that fucking stupid American. He thinks we all live in the dirt and don't have electricity? Arrogant piece of shit American. She thinks her language is difficult? Try learning French, asshole!" Now I understand, people are extremely sensitive, especially these days. Many of us live in a clickbait, headline-reading, "speak before you think" type of world. So when someone sees something they don't like or agree with, their natural reaction is to get offended and tell the world what they're thinking in the comment section of a complete stranger's video.

[00:01:44] I don't condone this type of behavior, but I understand it. But what you have to understand about the United States of America is that most people in this country do not give a single fuck about you, your country, your language, or the resentment in your heart. This isn't because we think other countries are less important or inferior. It's because we're simply not exposed to life outside the U.S. And I say we for the sake of simplicity, this is, of course, just my opinion. I do not and I cannot speak for all 330 million Americans. So, let's continue. Let's talk about public school. In the U.S. in my experience, in public school, we're taught about things like how to read and write in English, literature, algebra, geometry, calculus, sciences like biology and chemistry, physical education like sports and fitness, the robotic basics of a foreign language, and something called social studies, which covers history and geography. But here's the thing - we're taught about the history and the geography of the United States of America. Not Brazil, not Russia, not Vietnam. not Tanzania, not Scotland. The United States of America. That's why Americans don't really know which languages people speak in Eritrea. That's why Americans don't know that Turkey is a very interesting place because it's technically both an Asian and a European country. That's why Americans think that everyone who speaks Spanish is Mexican.

[00:03:18] That's why Americans don't know what life outside the U.S. is really like. It's because the only exposure we get to life outside of our country is one of those commercials with sad music and a starving kid sitting in the dirt somewhere in Africa trying to convince you that donating just $0.35 a day will feed that starving child. That's why even today, people think that's what life is like for everybody in Africa. And even though we've got people from all over the world living and working here, most Americans don't know anything about different languages and cultures. And in my opinion, that's because although the U.S. is an incredibly diverse country, ethnically speaking, we're still very divided in many ways. It's hard to generalize, but many people here tend to hang out with people they identify with. And due to the history of this country, people tend to identify with people that look and sound like them. And maybe that's human nature. But if that's the case, I think the history of segregation in this country exacerbated that problem and created a lot of barriers that keep us from understanding and appreciating people and cultures different from our own. So think about it. If from the time you're born, you're taught to stick with your own; if you grow up in a neighborhood that isn't multicultural, and you're taught that everyone or anyone who doesn't look or sound like you is the enemy,

[00:04:44] then you probably wouldn't ever feel motivated to get to know someone of a different ethnic or cultural background. You probably would take whatever you see on TV and use that as a representation of the people you know nothing about and you've never even interacted with. And to take it a step further, you'd be looking through the lens of your misconceptions when trying to interpret the behavior of those people, only further reinforcing the ignorant misconceptions you have. And let me remind you, everyone does that, not just Americans. We're all emotional creatures with faulty logic that just want to feel like we understand things and that we're in control. But getting back to the Americans, these stupid, ungrateful, arrogant, racist pieces of shit. Many Americans don't know much about other countries because we're never really encouraged to. Most Americans don't travel internationally. Most Americans don't speak more than one language, right? Most Americans are uneducated about all kinds of things like finance, tax laws, investments, the judicial system, politics, health care, business, psychology. I mean, the list goes on and on. Many of us don't know shit about our own country, so it would be unreasonable to expect us to know something about any other country. From the time we were little kids until the day we die, we're being told that America is the greatest country on the planet. We're taught to be proud to be Americans.

Lee Greenwood (God Bless the USA song plays): [00:06:19] If tomorrow all the things were gone, I'd worked for all my life. And I had to start again, with just my children and my wife. I'd thank my lucky stars to be living here today. 'Cause the flag still stands for freedom and they can't take that away. And I'm proud to be an American where at least I know I'm free. And I won't forget the men who died, who gave that right to me. And I gladly stand up, next to you and defend her still today. 'Cause there ain't no doubt I love this land, God bless the USA.

[00:07:28] We are always consuming America. Where is Hollywood - the heart of the film industry? In the United States of America. Where's the heart of the mainstream music industry? In the United States of America. What do we see on the news? Shit that's happening in the United States of America. What books are most of us reading? Books written in English by people from the United States of America. To what flag are we expected to pledge allegiance every single morning before school starts? The flag of the United States of America. I genuinely do not believe that most Americans harbor hatred for people from other countries or they think they're inferior in some way. I think most Americans don't know and have no reason to care about people from other countries. It's hard to care about something if you don't know it exists. The same way I imagine a gorilla born in captivity doesn't dream of a rainforest in the Congo. I mean, how could it dream about or want to get to a place if it doesn't know it exists? And maybe that doesn't make sense. My point is, if you're born in this box and all you've known since the day you were born is that box, and everybody in the box is telling you this is the greatest box to ever exist, this is the only box that exists, I doubt you would spend your days dreaming about another box if you'd never even had any idea or a clue or indication that there are hundreds of boxes that you could explore and get to know.

[00:09:03] You know, I just can't see how you would naturally think about all those other boxes. You just...you don't know they exist. Right? Hopefully that makes sense. Now, another topic of discussion that's really starting to get old is the idea that people from the U.S. shouldn't refer to themselves as Americans because America is a continent. So everyone from Canada all the way down to Argentina is an American. But let me make this clear for anyone who holds this opinion, we call ourselves Americans because the name of our country is the United States of America. That's literally the reason. So my question to you would be what should we call ourselves if not "Americans"? And the answer I always get is something like "United Stadians". That sounds extremely awkward and it also doesn't really make much sense. And, you know, I recently learned that the official name of Mexico is Los Estados Unidos Mexicanos or the United Mexican States. And what do people from Mexico call themselves? Mexicanos, right? They don't refer to themselves as Estado Mexicanos. Now, Mexico is a part of North America. But Mexicans aren't North Americans, right? They're Latin Americans. And by the way, what do most people in Latin America call people from the U.S.? Los Americanos. Os Americanos, right? The only people out here using the word "estadounidense" are people who don't appreciate the fact that we call ourselves Americans.

[00:10:42] Now, don't get me wrong, I know and understand that the word "estadounidense" is the correct word to use in Spanish or Portuguese, but that word simply doesn't exist in English. It's nothing personal, bro. I promise. The ironic thing about all of this is that people complain about Americans being uneducated and ignorant all the time and then they arrogantly talk down on Americans whenever we say something out of ignorance. It's as if some people really think that they know everything there is to know about the US and its people, and Americans have no clue what's going on in other countries. And that somehow makes them better than Americans. But I'd like to put things in perspective and remind you that just because you watch the news and see things about our country on social media doesn't mean that you know something about that country. If you haven't been there and talked to hundreds of people, thousands of people from different walks of life, then you really don't know anything. You simply know what you've heard. It's as if some people are upset because the entire world has its eyes on the U.S. for one reason or another. And they're upset because no one is paying attention to them. The whole thing to me is just a little irrational. But what's my point here? My point is the remedy to ignorance is education, not arrogance.

[00:12:07] The idea that you can get mad and disrespect an individual simply because he or she doesn't know something is pretty fucking childish and counterproductive, if you ask me. If you really cared about cultural understanding and education, you would take the time to educate people when they say something ignorant. You wouldn't respond with anger, resentment, and negativity because those things only generate more anger, resentment, and negativity. I guess what I have a hard time understanding is how you could be offended by a question. I have a hard time understanding how you could be offended by someone's opinion. I have a hard time understanding how you could be offended by someone's ignorance. Like, just stop and imagine for a minute - if your parents or your teachers got mad and disrespectful with you every time you didn't know something that they knew, it'd be pretty fucking ridiculous, right? So why is it that so many people choose to react that way to Americans? Actually, it's not even that - people react that way to anyone they see as different. Anyone who has an opposing opinion or an alternative lifestyle. Everyone is so quick to judge, condescend, talk shit, criticize, ridicule, embarrass and cancel anyone who lives or thinks differently from them. This has to stop. Instead of arrogance, choose humility. Instead of resentment, choose calmness. Instead of judgment, choose curiosity. And instead of ignorance, choose education. Peace!

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