#141 - YouTube is the Future

July 6, 2022

None of us know how long these apps will last, but if I had to bet all my money on the one that would outlast them all, it would be YouTube. In this episode, I'll give you 10 reasons why YouTube is and will continue to be the future of mass digital media.

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[00:00:00] Wassup y'all! You're listening to another episode of Life in English. I'm your host, Tony Kaizen. And this is an unordered list of reasons that YouTube is the future. Alright, now, like I said, this list of reasons is in no particular order. I just wrote them all down as I thought of them, and now I'm going to read them to you. So let's get started.

[00:00:26] The first reason I got for you, the first reason that YouTube is the future and it will slowly but surely annihilate the television, or at least network television, is that YouTube offers longevity. One of the most underrated features that makes YouTube great is the ability to essentially host a video on the platform forever. Forever and for free, bro! And when I say forever, obviously, I mean until YouTube doesn't exist anymore. And obviously I have no idea if this is true or not, but I just imagine YouTube will outlast you and me in terms of years. Just my assumption.

[00:01:06] And even if that's not the case right now, today, you can watch videos that were posted 12 years ago if you want. Can you turn on a TV and easily watch any and every episode of your favorite show from 12 years ago? Just the fact that your videos can be watched an infinite number of times over decades is something that no other platform has achieved. And somebody please correct me if I'm wrong but outside of YouTube, I can't think of any other platform that has done something like that. That's not some major news network or excuse me, TV network or something like that. I can't think of one.

[00:01:42] And that takes me to my next point. YouTube is a search engine. You can essentially find or learn just about anything you want on YouTube. Now, many people don't know that Google and YouTube are owned by the same company, and both platforms function in a similar way, at least on the surface. When you want the answer to a question or an explanation of a complex concept or recommendations for a restaurant in your area, what do you do? You pull out your phone and type specific words in the Google search engine. And I think it's safe to say that we all do the same thing on YouTube.

[00:02:19] When you want to see an explanation of a topic or a demonstration of an activity, I'm willing to bet the first thing you do is pull out your phone and type some specific keywords on YouTube, hoping that somebody has made a decent video about it. I know that's the case for me. Almost all the knowledge I possess that's of any value was acquired on the tube. Either that or I just learned through pure trial and error, also known as experience. And most of the time, some knowledge I gained after watching YouTube videos is what gave me the confidence to go out there and get the experience. I hope that makes sense.

[00:02:55] Now the difference between Google and YouTube is we're not just searching for information on YouTube. We're also searching for entertainment - from sports highlights to vloggers, to talk shows, to podcasts, stunts, movies, interviews, and everything in-between. YouTube really seems limitless at times. There are literally millions of videos in the YouTube ecosystem that I'll never know about because I'm not interested in those subjects. But the point is, they're out there. There's room for everybody on YouTube, minus the select group of people that YouTube considers harmful to the platform and its users obviously. But it doesn't matter if you're into biochemistry, DIY projects, soccer, cooking, traveling, engineering, mathematics, entrepreneurship, anime, video games, makeup, psychology, philosophy, whatever it is, there's a community of people making and watching videos about it on YouTube. Can we say the same thing about network television?

[00:03:58] Now, another reason that YouTube is the future is that you have almost complete control over the entire creative process. And before the Internet opened up to the masses, you would have to go through a bunch of gatekeepers to get your content seen by the masses. And what's a gatekeeper? Well, the literal definition of gatekeeper is an attendant at a gate who is paid to control who goes through that gate. So think like a doorman before a gate or a security guard but they stand at the gate. That's the gatekeeper. But a more general way to use the word is when you mean to say someone who controls access to something.

[00:04:37] For example, in the past, record labels acted as gatekeepers to the music industry. They were the ones who decided which artists would get their music distributed around the world because in the past, artists didn't have access to free distribution channels like they do today. So when you think "social media", you can really think "distribution channel" because that's really what it is in my opinion. But anyway, getting back to my point, when the gatekeepers of the film, music, photo, book, and design industries had all the control, anyone who wanted national or international distribution would have to be approved by the people who own the record label or the publishing house or the art gallery or whatever.

[00:05:19] So if you didn't fit into the box they provided for you, you were fucked. Because without distribution, no one will know your work exists. And if no one knows it exists, then you will never be recognized for it, let alone compensated. But these days, you don't need to be approved by anyone but your target audience. If you make videos, you get to decide the video thumbnail, right, which can be changed any time you want. There's only one movie cover for every DVD or cassette tape or whatever. You can literally make a movie for YouTube, decide that you don't like the cover, and change it any time you want, as many times as you want.

[00:05:58] You get to decide the title, which you can also change if you want. There's no change in movie titles, but on YouTube you can. It's your choice. You decide the video description, the video length, the editing style, which has a huge impact on how the video is received. Right? The soundtrack, the language in which you recorded, or the language is in which you record it, the subject matter of the video, it's all up to you. The only limit is your imagination. And the point is that there are no more record labels or publishing houses putting limits on what message you can spread or how you spread it. You can make a free account on YouTube, upload a video and click Publish.

[00:06:40] Not only are there no more gatekeepers, there's no more fucking gate. You understand? The barrier to entry is the same for everyone now. And when I say barrier to entry, I mean the obstacle between you and that field in which you want to be, right? A barrier is like an obstacle, something keeping you from moving forward. So the barrier to entry -- figuratively speaking -- is whatever stopping you from moving forward or getting involved. So these days, when it comes to content production and making videos, podcasts or whatever, the barrier is so much lower than it has ever been. And it's the same for every human being on the planet now. It's three things. Wi-Fi, a way to record audio, video or written words, and a fucking idea.

[00:07:27] That's it. That's literally it, bro. If somebody tells you that you need more than that, they're either misinformed or they're trying to sell you some shit that you do not need. Take my word on that one. Just trust me on it. That's all you need. That's not all you need but technically to get started, that's all you need. Another thing that's extremely important is what brings me to my next point - the great thing about YouTube and social media in general, but YouTube is just the king of them all, in my opinion, is that creators get to connect with their audiences in a way that wasn't possible before. Right?

[00:08:03] In the past, the thing that drew us to celebrity actors is the fact that we only saw them on TV. They captivated us with their performances on the movie screen but other than the occasional, like, shallow interviews, we didn't really know anything about them. The mystique of the celebrity is what made their presence so valuable, in my opinion. But nowadays, with the explosion of social media and vlogging, what people appreciate is proximity. Being able to leave a comment on your favorite creator's video and have them respond personally is something that wasn't really possible in the past. A video that lets you know what your favorite creator or actor is doing at 9 a.m. on a Tuesday is now considered valuable content depending on who's making and watching it.

[00:08:50] Social media has allowed us to speak directly to the people that want to listen to us. It's allowed us to get direct feedback from the people for whom we are making our content. It's allowed us to get financial support from the people who follow our work so that we can continue to produce the content. And that just wasn't possible before the modern day Internet. Which takes me to my next point, or a reason that YouTube is certainly the future - and that is, YouTube pays its creators. You can make money producing videos for YouTube, like, I told you before, you need Wi-Fi, a way to record the content, and a fucking idea. That's what you need.

[00:09:37] And if you have those three things and your ideas are good enough, and you can execute on the fucking idea, you can get paid. To make YouTube videos. Like I say that, and you understand me, you get...it's like, "Duh, it's fucking 2022, of course we know this!" But...YouTube pays its creators, bro! YouTube was smart enough to understand that the video platform is worthless without a catalog of interesting videos to watch. So as a way to incentivize great creators to publish videos that people actually want to watch on YouTube, they've created a win-win-win situation.

[00:10:22] Viewers can always find new and interesting videos to watch, creators get paid for making videos that viewers want to watch, and YouTube has videos to run their ads on and viewers to show those ads to. Everybody wins. As far as I know, the same cannot be said for any other major content platform at the moment. On every other platform your favorite content creators are busting their asses to make great content, and they're not getting a dime from the platform or from the viewers. A million followers is not the same as $1,000,000. Please do not forget that. Now, it might have sounded like I was a little upset about the fact that social networks don't pay creators to make content, but that is not at all the case.

[00:11:08] My point was that YouTube is the only platform on which you can literally be paid to do nothing but create awesome videos that people want to watch. You can use social media to get paid even if you don't make YouTube videos but then your content production would require a different strategy and approach. Now, I don't want to lose you guys by going into too much detail here, but it really is interesting to talk about this stuff from the perspective of both a creator and a business person so if you do want to talk about it, join the Discord server and shoot me a message.

[00:11:38] But anyway, all of that brings me back to my next point, which is that businesses are built on the back of YouTube all the time. Real businesses. Like legit. Businesses, money-generating like, you know what I'm saying, a real business off of YouTube videos like take MrBeast, for example, a kid from...I think North Carolina who just was making stupid videos in his room one day. And just through...of course, it's a whole long story, he did a lot, experimented a lot, reinvested all of his money, but all off of making YouTube videos that he was eventually paid to make and then taking that money to reinvest and make better videos so that he can make more money off of his great videos and take that money and start a business. And now because he has brand recognition over here, people are naturally going to go check out the business and support the business, especially when they see that he doesn't care about money. He just wants more money to make better videos to help more people.

[00:12:35] Shit, how could I not support? So now they're watching more videos. Literally watching MrBeast's videos is literally helping people in Africa get water or people in North Carolina get food for the next two weeks. Like literally! I highly recommend you check out MrBeast, understand his story and how he became the biggest YouTuber on the planet. It's...it's...it's insane, bro. It's insane. I'm pretty sure I'm gonna do an episode on how similar MrBeast and Jeff Bezos are. I don't see how you could not make that comparison, but we'll save that for another episode. But the point is, he was just a normal guy, just started making videos at his house. That's it. And just by reinvesting everything he got out of the videos back into the videos, got bigger and bigger and bigger...and the bigger you get in this game, the higher your earning potential is, you know what I'm saying?

[00:13:25] So you could literally do nothing but make videos and start your own personal fitness business...coffee shop. You want to be a lawyer? You can use social media to build your fucking business, literally making videos for free. It doesn't matter what it is. You want to be a dog trainer or a dog breeder or a painter or an au pair or a fucking lawn care specialist. It doesn't...like bruh, it doesn't matter! You can build a business, offer videos on YouTube or TikTok or Instagram or whatever, whatever platform you choose. I'm just saying YouTube offers all those other benefits - longevity, searchability, and those things, right?

[00:14:04] But the point is the same - what used to be just stupid kids making dumbass videos on the internet is now how people literally quit their jobs and wake up and do what they want to do every day on YouTube. The account is free. You can make an account right now. And go start your fucking channel! There's nothing stopping you. If you're listening to this right now, you've got Wi-Fi, a smart device, all you need is a fucking idea. Now, ideas are cheap. Execution is everything. I'm not trying to oversimplify it or nothing like that, but it really does boil down to that. Alright?

[00:14:43] Which takes me to my next point - I don't want to lose track of my notes here. The next reason that YouTube is the future is that anyone with the Internet and a smart device can make content, like I just said - the barrier to entry is lower than it has ever been in human history. For all the pessimists out there, I'm not talking shit. I used to be a pessimist myself, but for the pessimist specifically, you might sit there and complain about how you need a lot of money or a lot of following, or a lot of this or a lot of that to get started. There's all these reasons that you can't get started, all these reasons that you can't do something. It's bullshit, bruh! It's bullshit. You don't have to wait for anyone. You don't need anyone's permission to get started. You don't have to follow someone else's framework or try to walk down their path. You can create your own legacy. You can pave your own path. You can set up your phone, press record, and send your message out into the world...for free!

[00:15:44] And it doesn't even matter what your preferred style of communication is. If you're good on camera, start a YouTube channel; if you're a great speaker but hate being on camera, start a podcast; if you're an amazing writer, start a blog or publish an e-book. All the bullshit excuses, bro - lack of equipment, lack of following, lack of ability, they're out the window! Every single person listening to this right now has a smartphone or a computer. Every single creator on YouTube or any other platforms, for that matter, started with zero followers. Every single person who owns a smartphone or computer and learn how to use that smartphone or computer and the social networks that run on those devices is capable of learning how to make content.

[00:16:26] Stop for a second and just realize that all of your favorite YouTubers are just regular people, like you and me. Stop and realize that people making videos about cake, and sports, science, and dog breeding, are getting paid more than people with master's degrees. Stop and realize that none of those people were rich celebrities when they started. Stop and think about all the people who won't start a YouTube channel or a podcast because they've naively bought into the idea that their value is based on their follower count. Or that they're supposed to blow up overnight without putting any hard work into the process. Like, imagine how much more content would be out there if people weren't afraid to create. Just something to think about.

[00:17:12] Let me move on to the next reason that YouTube is the future. You decide what you watch, when you watch it, and where you watch it. Before YouTube, you had to watch whatever was on the TV at the time. And who decided what was on TV at a particular time? The TV networks, of course. If you wanted to see a particular show, you had to be in front of a TV at a particular time. And if you missed it, then you missed it. Unless you have money and maybe you got it on DVR, right? You could…used to be able to record live TV and then watch it later. Or maybe you catch a rerun at some point, right?

[00:17:51] And if you want to watch Rick and Morty, but the network wants to show Bob's Burgers, you're either watching Bob's Burgers or nothing at all, those were your choices. And that's why Netflix wins. Your movies and shows when you want and where you want with no annoying ads or interruptions for just $7 a month. And that's why YouTube wins. Videos you want to see, when you want, and where you want for free, with the occasional annoying ad. But guess what? You can pay not to see those ads, too, if you really want. It doesn't matter if you're laying naked in bed, commuting to work on the train, working out at the gym, walking in the park, or cooking dinner. You can get access to your favorite videos and podcasts whenever and wherever you want.

[00:18:38] Now, another reason that YouTube is the future is because it learns about your viewing habits and recommends more videos. Every time you search for or click on something, YouTube learns a little more about you and your interests. YouTube then uses that data to guess which videos you would like to see in the future. It's always trying to find ways to get you to spend more time watching videos. So it's always trying to learn about what you find interesting. This means that even if you're too lazy to search for something new, YouTube will always recommend something new. From which videos you click on to the amount of time you spend watching a video, to what you do after you watch the video. YouTube is collecting data in order to create a better user experience on their platform. And also so they can show you more relevant ads, right?

[00:19:29] Now, another cool thing, another reason that YouTube is the future, another differentiator is that you can have multiple YouTube channels. If you've got enough passion about different disciplines, if you know how to build teams, and make great content, you could create multiple streams of revenue in the form of multiple channels with videos that can be found in search results and recommend it to people for years to come. All of that translates into passive income for years to come. And those, my friends, are ten reasons why YouTube is the future.

[END OF EPISODE]

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[00:00:00] Wassup y'all! You're listening to another episode of Life in English. I'm your host, Tony Kaizen. And this is an unordered list of reasons that YouTube is the future. Alright, now, like I said, this list of reasons is in no particular order. I just wrote them all down as I thought of them, and now I'm going to read them to you. So let's get started.

[00:00:26] The first reason I got for you, the first reason that YouTube is the future and it will slowly but surely annihilate the television, or at least network television, is that YouTube offers longevity. One of the most underrated features that makes YouTube great is the ability to essentially host a video on the platform forever. Forever and for free, bro! And when I say forever, obviously, I mean until YouTube doesn't exist anymore. And obviously I have no idea if this is true or not, but I just imagine YouTube will outlast you and me in terms of years. Just my assumption.

[00:01:06] And even if that's not the case right now, today, you can watch videos that were posted 12 years ago if you want. Can you turn on a TV and easily watch any and every episode of your favorite show from 12 years ago? Just the fact that your videos can be watched an infinite number of times over decades is something that no other platform has achieved. And somebody please correct me if I'm wrong but outside of YouTube, I can't think of any other platform that has done something like that. That's not some major news network or excuse me, TV network or something like that. I can't think of one.

[00:01:42] And that takes me to my next point. YouTube is a search engine. You can essentially find or learn just about anything you want on YouTube. Now, many people don't know that Google and YouTube are owned by the same company, and both platforms function in a similar way, at least on the surface. When you want the answer to a question or an explanation of a complex concept or recommendations for a restaurant in your area, what do you do? You pull out your phone and type specific words in the Google search engine. And I think it's safe to say that we all do the same thing on YouTube.

[00:02:19] When you want to see an explanation of a topic or a demonstration of an activity, I'm willing to bet the first thing you do is pull out your phone and type some specific keywords on YouTube, hoping that somebody has made a decent video about it. I know that's the case for me. Almost all the knowledge I possess that's of any value was acquired on the tube. Either that or I just learned through pure trial and error, also known as experience. And most of the time, some knowledge I gained after watching YouTube videos is what gave me the confidence to go out there and get the experience. I hope that makes sense.

[00:02:55] Now the difference between Google and YouTube is we're not just searching for information on YouTube. We're also searching for entertainment - from sports highlights to vloggers, to talk shows, to podcasts, stunts, movies, interviews, and everything in-between. YouTube really seems limitless at times. There are literally millions of videos in the YouTube ecosystem that I'll never know about because I'm not interested in those subjects. But the point is, they're out there. There's room for everybody on YouTube, minus the select group of people that YouTube considers harmful to the platform and its users obviously. But it doesn't matter if you're into biochemistry, DIY projects, soccer, cooking, traveling, engineering, mathematics, entrepreneurship, anime, video games, makeup, psychology, philosophy, whatever it is, there's a community of people making and watching videos about it on YouTube. Can we say the same thing about network television?

[00:03:58] Now, another reason that YouTube is the future is that you have almost complete control over the entire creative process. And before the Internet opened up to the masses, you would have to go through a bunch of gatekeepers to get your content seen by the masses. And what's a gatekeeper? Well, the literal definition of gatekeeper is an attendant at a gate who is paid to control who goes through that gate. So think like a doorman before a gate or a security guard but they stand at the gate. That's the gatekeeper. But a more general way to use the word is when you mean to say someone who controls access to something.

[00:04:37] For example, in the past, record labels acted as gatekeepers to the music industry. They were the ones who decided which artists would get their music distributed around the world because in the past, artists didn't have access to free distribution channels like they do today. So when you think "social media", you can really think "distribution channel" because that's really what it is in my opinion. But anyway, getting back to my point, when the gatekeepers of the film, music, photo, book, and design industries had all the control, anyone who wanted national or international distribution would have to be approved by the people who own the record label or the publishing house or the art gallery or whatever.

[00:05:19] So if you didn't fit into the box they provided for you, you were fucked. Because without distribution, no one will know your work exists. And if no one knows it exists, then you will never be recognized for it, let alone compensated. But these days, you don't need to be approved by anyone but your target audience. If you make videos, you get to decide the video thumbnail, right, which can be changed any time you want. There's only one movie cover for every DVD or cassette tape or whatever. You can literally make a movie for YouTube, decide that you don't like the cover, and change it any time you want, as many times as you want.

[00:05:58] You get to decide the title, which you can also change if you want. There's no change in movie titles, but on YouTube you can. It's your choice. You decide the video description, the video length, the editing style, which has a huge impact on how the video is received. Right? The soundtrack, the language in which you recorded, or the language is in which you record it, the subject matter of the video, it's all up to you. The only limit is your imagination. And the point is that there are no more record labels or publishing houses putting limits on what message you can spread or how you spread it. You can make a free account on YouTube, upload a video and click Publish.

[00:06:40] Not only are there no more gatekeepers, there's no more fucking gate. You understand? The barrier to entry is the same for everyone now. And when I say barrier to entry, I mean the obstacle between you and that field in which you want to be, right? A barrier is like an obstacle, something keeping you from moving forward. So the barrier to entry -- figuratively speaking -- is whatever stopping you from moving forward or getting involved. So these days, when it comes to content production and making videos, podcasts or whatever, the barrier is so much lower than it has ever been. And it's the same for every human being on the planet now. It's three things. Wi-Fi, a way to record audio, video or written words, and a fucking idea.

[00:07:27] That's it. That's literally it, bro. If somebody tells you that you need more than that, they're either misinformed or they're trying to sell you some shit that you do not need. Take my word on that one. Just trust me on it. That's all you need. That's not all you need but technically to get started, that's all you need. Another thing that's extremely important is what brings me to my next point - the great thing about YouTube and social media in general, but YouTube is just the king of them all, in my opinion, is that creators get to connect with their audiences in a way that wasn't possible before. Right?

[00:08:03] In the past, the thing that drew us to celebrity actors is the fact that we only saw them on TV. They captivated us with their performances on the movie screen but other than the occasional, like, shallow interviews, we didn't really know anything about them. The mystique of the celebrity is what made their presence so valuable, in my opinion. But nowadays, with the explosion of social media and vlogging, what people appreciate is proximity. Being able to leave a comment on your favorite creator's video and have them respond personally is something that wasn't really possible in the past. A video that lets you know what your favorite creator or actor is doing at 9 a.m. on a Tuesday is now considered valuable content depending on who's making and watching it.

[00:08:50] Social media has allowed us to speak directly to the people that want to listen to us. It's allowed us to get direct feedback from the people for whom we are making our content. It's allowed us to get financial support from the people who follow our work so that we can continue to produce the content. And that just wasn't possible before the modern day Internet. Which takes me to my next point, or a reason that YouTube is certainly the future - and that is, YouTube pays its creators. You can make money producing videos for YouTube, like, I told you before, you need Wi-Fi, a way to record the content, and a fucking idea. That's what you need.

[00:09:37] And if you have those three things and your ideas are good enough, and you can execute on the fucking idea, you can get paid. To make YouTube videos. Like I say that, and you understand me, you get...it's like, "Duh, it's fucking 2022, of course we know this!" But...YouTube pays its creators, bro! YouTube was smart enough to understand that the video platform is worthless without a catalog of interesting videos to watch. So as a way to incentivize great creators to publish videos that people actually want to watch on YouTube, they've created a win-win-win situation.

[00:10:22] Viewers can always find new and interesting videos to watch, creators get paid for making videos that viewers want to watch, and YouTube has videos to run their ads on and viewers to show those ads to. Everybody wins. As far as I know, the same cannot be said for any other major content platform at the moment. On every other platform your favorite content creators are busting their asses to make great content, and they're not getting a dime from the platform or from the viewers. A million followers is not the same as $1,000,000. Please do not forget that. Now, it might have sounded like I was a little upset about the fact that social networks don't pay creators to make content, but that is not at all the case.

[00:11:08] My point was that YouTube is the only platform on which you can literally be paid to do nothing but create awesome videos that people want to watch. You can use social media to get paid even if you don't make YouTube videos but then your content production would require a different strategy and approach. Now, I don't want to lose you guys by going into too much detail here, but it really is interesting to talk about this stuff from the perspective of both a creator and a business person so if you do want to talk about it, join the Discord server and shoot me a message.

[00:11:38] But anyway, all of that brings me back to my next point, which is that businesses are built on the back of YouTube all the time. Real businesses. Like legit. Businesses, money-generating like, you know what I'm saying, a real business off of YouTube videos like take MrBeast, for example, a kid from...I think North Carolina who just was making stupid videos in his room one day. And just through...of course, it's a whole long story, he did a lot, experimented a lot, reinvested all of his money, but all off of making YouTube videos that he was eventually paid to make and then taking that money to reinvest and make better videos so that he can make more money off of his great videos and take that money and start a business. And now because he has brand recognition over here, people are naturally going to go check out the business and support the business, especially when they see that he doesn't care about money. He just wants more money to make better videos to help more people.

[00:12:35] Shit, how could I not support? So now they're watching more videos. Literally watching MrBeast's videos is literally helping people in Africa get water or people in North Carolina get food for the next two weeks. Like literally! I highly recommend you check out MrBeast, understand his story and how he became the biggest YouTuber on the planet. It's...it's...it's insane, bro. It's insane. I'm pretty sure I'm gonna do an episode on how similar MrBeast and Jeff Bezos are. I don't see how you could not make that comparison, but we'll save that for another episode. But the point is, he was just a normal guy, just started making videos at his house. That's it. And just by reinvesting everything he got out of the videos back into the videos, got bigger and bigger and bigger...and the bigger you get in this game, the higher your earning potential is, you know what I'm saying?

[00:13:25] So you could literally do nothing but make videos and start your own personal fitness business...coffee shop. You want to be a lawyer? You can use social media to build your fucking business, literally making videos for free. It doesn't matter what it is. You want to be a dog trainer or a dog breeder or a painter or an au pair or a fucking lawn care specialist. It doesn't...like bruh, it doesn't matter! You can build a business, offer videos on YouTube or TikTok or Instagram or whatever, whatever platform you choose. I'm just saying YouTube offers all those other benefits - longevity, searchability, and those things, right?

[00:14:04] But the point is the same - what used to be just stupid kids making dumbass videos on the internet is now how people literally quit their jobs and wake up and do what they want to do every day on YouTube. The account is free. You can make an account right now. And go start your fucking channel! There's nothing stopping you. If you're listening to this right now, you've got Wi-Fi, a smart device, all you need is a fucking idea. Now, ideas are cheap. Execution is everything. I'm not trying to oversimplify it or nothing like that, but it really does boil down to that. Alright?

[00:14:43] Which takes me to my next point - I don't want to lose track of my notes here. The next reason that YouTube is the future is that anyone with the Internet and a smart device can make content, like I just said - the barrier to entry is lower than it has ever been in human history. For all the pessimists out there, I'm not talking shit. I used to be a pessimist myself, but for the pessimist specifically, you might sit there and complain about how you need a lot of money or a lot of following, or a lot of this or a lot of that to get started. There's all these reasons that you can't get started, all these reasons that you can't do something. It's bullshit, bruh! It's bullshit. You don't have to wait for anyone. You don't need anyone's permission to get started. You don't have to follow someone else's framework or try to walk down their path. You can create your own legacy. You can pave your own path. You can set up your phone, press record, and send your message out into the world...for free!

[00:15:44] And it doesn't even matter what your preferred style of communication is. If you're good on camera, start a YouTube channel; if you're a great speaker but hate being on camera, start a podcast; if you're an amazing writer, start a blog or publish an e-book. All the bullshit excuses, bro - lack of equipment, lack of following, lack of ability, they're out the window! Every single person listening to this right now has a smartphone or a computer. Every single creator on YouTube or any other platforms, for that matter, started with zero followers. Every single person who owns a smartphone or computer and learn how to use that smartphone or computer and the social networks that run on those devices is capable of learning how to make content.

[00:16:26] Stop for a second and just realize that all of your favorite YouTubers are just regular people, like you and me. Stop and realize that people making videos about cake, and sports, science, and dog breeding, are getting paid more than people with master's degrees. Stop and realize that none of those people were rich celebrities when they started. Stop and think about all the people who won't start a YouTube channel or a podcast because they've naively bought into the idea that their value is based on their follower count. Or that they're supposed to blow up overnight without putting any hard work into the process. Like, imagine how much more content would be out there if people weren't afraid to create. Just something to think about.

[00:17:12] Let me move on to the next reason that YouTube is the future. You decide what you watch, when you watch it, and where you watch it. Before YouTube, you had to watch whatever was on the TV at the time. And who decided what was on TV at a particular time? The TV networks, of course. If you wanted to see a particular show, you had to be in front of a TV at a particular time. And if you missed it, then you missed it. Unless you have money and maybe you got it on DVR, right? You could…used to be able to record live TV and then watch it later. Or maybe you catch a rerun at some point, right?

[00:17:51] And if you want to watch Rick and Morty, but the network wants to show Bob's Burgers, you're either watching Bob's Burgers or nothing at all, those were your choices. And that's why Netflix wins. Your movies and shows when you want and where you want with no annoying ads or interruptions for just $7 a month. And that's why YouTube wins. Videos you want to see, when you want, and where you want for free, with the occasional annoying ad. But guess what? You can pay not to see those ads, too, if you really want. It doesn't matter if you're laying naked in bed, commuting to work on the train, working out at the gym, walking in the park, or cooking dinner. You can get access to your favorite videos and podcasts whenever and wherever you want.

[00:18:38] Now, another reason that YouTube is the future is because it learns about your viewing habits and recommends more videos. Every time you search for or click on something, YouTube learns a little more about you and your interests. YouTube then uses that data to guess which videos you would like to see in the future. It's always trying to find ways to get you to spend more time watching videos. So it's always trying to learn about what you find interesting. This means that even if you're too lazy to search for something new, YouTube will always recommend something new. From which videos you click on to the amount of time you spend watching a video, to what you do after you watch the video. YouTube is collecting data in order to create a better user experience on their platform. And also so they can show you more relevant ads, right?

[00:19:29] Now, another cool thing, another reason that YouTube is the future, another differentiator is that you can have multiple YouTube channels. If you've got enough passion about different disciplines, if you know how to build teams, and make great content, you could create multiple streams of revenue in the form of multiple channels with videos that can be found in search results and recommend it to people for years to come. All of that translates into passive income for years to come. And those, my friends, are ten reasons why YouTube is the future.

[END OF EPISODE]

Writing prompts

  • What is your favorite social media platform?
  • Do you have a favorite YouTube channel? If so, why is it your favorite?
  • Has YouTube affected any industries besides TV and Movies?
  • What would you do if your kids told you they wanted to be YouTubers?
  • What's something you would change about YouTube if you had the chance?
Key Vocabulary & Grammar Guide
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Transcript

[00:00:00] Wassup y'all! You're listening to another episode of Life in English. I'm your host, Tony Kaizen. And this is an unordered list of reasons that YouTube is the future. Alright, now, like I said, this list of reasons is in no particular order. I just wrote them all down as I thought of them, and now I'm going to read them to you. So let's get started.

[00:00:26] The first reason I got for you, the first reason that YouTube is the future and it will slowly but surely annihilate the television, or at least network television, is that YouTube offers longevity. One of the most underrated features that makes YouTube great is the ability to essentially host a video on the platform forever. Forever and for free, bro! And when I say forever, obviously, I mean until YouTube doesn't exist anymore. And obviously I have no idea if this is true or not, but I just imagine YouTube will outlast you and me in terms of years. Just my assumption.

[00:01:06] And even if that's not the case right now, today, you can watch videos that were posted 12 years ago if you want. Can you turn on a TV and easily watch any and every episode of your favorite show from 12 years ago? Just the fact that your videos can be watched an infinite number of times over decades is something that no other platform has achieved. And somebody please correct me if I'm wrong but outside of YouTube, I can't think of any other platform that has done something like that. That's not some major news network or excuse me, TV network or something like that. I can't think of one.

[00:01:42] And that takes me to my next point. YouTube is a search engine. You can essentially find or learn just about anything you want on YouTube. Now, many people don't know that Google and YouTube are owned by the same company, and both platforms function in a similar way, at least on the surface. When you want the answer to a question or an explanation of a complex concept or recommendations for a restaurant in your area, what do you do? You pull out your phone and type specific words in the Google search engine. And I think it's safe to say that we all do the same thing on YouTube.

[00:02:19] When you want to see an explanation of a topic or a demonstration of an activity, I'm willing to bet the first thing you do is pull out your phone and type some specific keywords on YouTube, hoping that somebody has made a decent video about it. I know that's the case for me. Almost all the knowledge I possess that's of any value was acquired on the tube. Either that or I just learned through pure trial and error, also known as experience. And most of the time, some knowledge I gained after watching YouTube videos is what gave me the confidence to go out there and get the experience. I hope that makes sense.

[00:02:55] Now the difference between Google and YouTube is we're not just searching for information on YouTube. We're also searching for entertainment - from sports highlights to vloggers, to talk shows, to podcasts, stunts, movies, interviews, and everything in-between. YouTube really seems limitless at times. There are literally millions of videos in the YouTube ecosystem that I'll never know about because I'm not interested in those subjects. But the point is, they're out there. There's room for everybody on YouTube, minus the select group of people that YouTube considers harmful to the platform and its users obviously. But it doesn't matter if you're into biochemistry, DIY projects, soccer, cooking, traveling, engineering, mathematics, entrepreneurship, anime, video games, makeup, psychology, philosophy, whatever it is, there's a community of people making and watching videos about it on YouTube. Can we say the same thing about network television?

[00:03:58] Now, another reason that YouTube is the future is that you have almost complete control over the entire creative process. And before the Internet opened up to the masses, you would have to go through a bunch of gatekeepers to get your content seen by the masses. And what's a gatekeeper? Well, the literal definition of gatekeeper is an attendant at a gate who is paid to control who goes through that gate. So think like a doorman before a gate or a security guard but they stand at the gate. That's the gatekeeper. But a more general way to use the word is when you mean to say someone who controls access to something.

[00:04:37] For example, in the past, record labels acted as gatekeepers to the music industry. They were the ones who decided which artists would get their music distributed around the world because in the past, artists didn't have access to free distribution channels like they do today. So when you think "social media", you can really think "distribution channel" because that's really what it is in my opinion. But anyway, getting back to my point, when the gatekeepers of the film, music, photo, book, and design industries had all the control, anyone who wanted national or international distribution would have to be approved by the people who own the record label or the publishing house or the art gallery or whatever.

[00:05:19] So if you didn't fit into the box they provided for you, you were fucked. Because without distribution, no one will know your work exists. And if no one knows it exists, then you will never be recognized for it, let alone compensated. But these days, you don't need to be approved by anyone but your target audience. If you make videos, you get to decide the video thumbnail, right, which can be changed any time you want. There's only one movie cover for every DVD or cassette tape or whatever. You can literally make a movie for YouTube, decide that you don't like the cover, and change it any time you want, as many times as you want.

[00:05:58] You get to decide the title, which you can also change if you want. There's no change in movie titles, but on YouTube you can. It's your choice. You decide the video description, the video length, the editing style, which has a huge impact on how the video is received. Right? The soundtrack, the language in which you recorded, or the language is in which you record it, the subject matter of the video, it's all up to you. The only limit is your imagination. And the point is that there are no more record labels or publishing houses putting limits on what message you can spread or how you spread it. You can make a free account on YouTube, upload a video and click Publish.

[00:06:40] Not only are there no more gatekeepers, there's no more fucking gate. You understand? The barrier to entry is the same for everyone now. And when I say barrier to entry, I mean the obstacle between you and that field in which you want to be, right? A barrier is like an obstacle, something keeping you from moving forward. So the barrier to entry -- figuratively speaking -- is whatever stopping you from moving forward or getting involved. So these days, when it comes to content production and making videos, podcasts or whatever, the barrier is so much lower than it has ever been. And it's the same for every human being on the planet now. It's three things. Wi-Fi, a way to record audio, video or written words, and a fucking idea.

[00:07:27] That's it. That's literally it, bro. If somebody tells you that you need more than that, they're either misinformed or they're trying to sell you some shit that you do not need. Take my word on that one. Just trust me on it. That's all you need. That's not all you need but technically to get started, that's all you need. Another thing that's extremely important is what brings me to my next point - the great thing about YouTube and social media in general, but YouTube is just the king of them all, in my opinion, is that creators get to connect with their audiences in a way that wasn't possible before. Right?

[00:08:03] In the past, the thing that drew us to celebrity actors is the fact that we only saw them on TV. They captivated us with their performances on the movie screen but other than the occasional, like, shallow interviews, we didn't really know anything about them. The mystique of the celebrity is what made their presence so valuable, in my opinion. But nowadays, with the explosion of social media and vlogging, what people appreciate is proximity. Being able to leave a comment on your favorite creator's video and have them respond personally is something that wasn't really possible in the past. A video that lets you know what your favorite creator or actor is doing at 9 a.m. on a Tuesday is now considered valuable content depending on who's making and watching it.

[00:08:50] Social media has allowed us to speak directly to the people that want to listen to us. It's allowed us to get direct feedback from the people for whom we are making our content. It's allowed us to get financial support from the people who follow our work so that we can continue to produce the content. And that just wasn't possible before the modern day Internet. Which takes me to my next point, or a reason that YouTube is certainly the future - and that is, YouTube pays its creators. You can make money producing videos for YouTube, like, I told you before, you need Wi-Fi, a way to record the content, and a fucking idea. That's what you need.

[00:09:37] And if you have those three things and your ideas are good enough, and you can execute on the fucking idea, you can get paid. To make YouTube videos. Like I say that, and you understand me, you get...it's like, "Duh, it's fucking 2022, of course we know this!" But...YouTube pays its creators, bro! YouTube was smart enough to understand that the video platform is worthless without a catalog of interesting videos to watch. So as a way to incentivize great creators to publish videos that people actually want to watch on YouTube, they've created a win-win-win situation.

[00:10:22] Viewers can always find new and interesting videos to watch, creators get paid for making videos that viewers want to watch, and YouTube has videos to run their ads on and viewers to show those ads to. Everybody wins. As far as I know, the same cannot be said for any other major content platform at the moment. On every other platform your favorite content creators are busting their asses to make great content, and they're not getting a dime from the platform or from the viewers. A million followers is not the same as $1,000,000. Please do not forget that. Now, it might have sounded like I was a little upset about the fact that social networks don't pay creators to make content, but that is not at all the case.

[00:11:08] My point was that YouTube is the only platform on which you can literally be paid to do nothing but create awesome videos that people want to watch. You can use social media to get paid even if you don't make YouTube videos but then your content production would require a different strategy and approach. Now, I don't want to lose you guys by going into too much detail here, but it really is interesting to talk about this stuff from the perspective of both a creator and a business person so if you do want to talk about it, join the Discord server and shoot me a message.

[00:11:38] But anyway, all of that brings me back to my next point, which is that businesses are built on the back of YouTube all the time. Real businesses. Like legit. Businesses, money-generating like, you know what I'm saying, a real business off of YouTube videos like take MrBeast, for example, a kid from...I think North Carolina who just was making stupid videos in his room one day. And just through...of course, it's a whole long story, he did a lot, experimented a lot, reinvested all of his money, but all off of making YouTube videos that he was eventually paid to make and then taking that money to reinvest and make better videos so that he can make more money off of his great videos and take that money and start a business. And now because he has brand recognition over here, people are naturally going to go check out the business and support the business, especially when they see that he doesn't care about money. He just wants more money to make better videos to help more people.

[00:12:35] Shit, how could I not support? So now they're watching more videos. Literally watching MrBeast's videos is literally helping people in Africa get water or people in North Carolina get food for the next two weeks. Like literally! I highly recommend you check out MrBeast, understand his story and how he became the biggest YouTuber on the planet. It's...it's...it's insane, bro. It's insane. I'm pretty sure I'm gonna do an episode on how similar MrBeast and Jeff Bezos are. I don't see how you could not make that comparison, but we'll save that for another episode. But the point is, he was just a normal guy, just started making videos at his house. That's it. And just by reinvesting everything he got out of the videos back into the videos, got bigger and bigger and bigger...and the bigger you get in this game, the higher your earning potential is, you know what I'm saying?

[00:13:25] So you could literally do nothing but make videos and start your own personal fitness business...coffee shop. You want to be a lawyer? You can use social media to build your fucking business, literally making videos for free. It doesn't matter what it is. You want to be a dog trainer or a dog breeder or a painter or an au pair or a fucking lawn care specialist. It doesn't...like bruh, it doesn't matter! You can build a business, offer videos on YouTube or TikTok or Instagram or whatever, whatever platform you choose. I'm just saying YouTube offers all those other benefits - longevity, searchability, and those things, right?

[00:14:04] But the point is the same - what used to be just stupid kids making dumbass videos on the internet is now how people literally quit their jobs and wake up and do what they want to do every day on YouTube. The account is free. You can make an account right now. And go start your fucking channel! There's nothing stopping you. If you're listening to this right now, you've got Wi-Fi, a smart device, all you need is a fucking idea. Now, ideas are cheap. Execution is everything. I'm not trying to oversimplify it or nothing like that, but it really does boil down to that. Alright?

[00:14:43] Which takes me to my next point - I don't want to lose track of my notes here. The next reason that YouTube is the future is that anyone with the Internet and a smart device can make content, like I just said - the barrier to entry is lower than it has ever been in human history. For all the pessimists out there, I'm not talking shit. I used to be a pessimist myself, but for the pessimist specifically, you might sit there and complain about how you need a lot of money or a lot of following, or a lot of this or a lot of that to get started. There's all these reasons that you can't get started, all these reasons that you can't do something. It's bullshit, bruh! It's bullshit. You don't have to wait for anyone. You don't need anyone's permission to get started. You don't have to follow someone else's framework or try to walk down their path. You can create your own legacy. You can pave your own path. You can set up your phone, press record, and send your message out into the world...for free!

[00:15:44] And it doesn't even matter what your preferred style of communication is. If you're good on camera, start a YouTube channel; if you're a great speaker but hate being on camera, start a podcast; if you're an amazing writer, start a blog or publish an e-book. All the bullshit excuses, bro - lack of equipment, lack of following, lack of ability, they're out the window! Every single person listening to this right now has a smartphone or a computer. Every single creator on YouTube or any other platforms, for that matter, started with zero followers. Every single person who owns a smartphone or computer and learn how to use that smartphone or computer and the social networks that run on those devices is capable of learning how to make content.

[00:16:26] Stop for a second and just realize that all of your favorite YouTubers are just regular people, like you and me. Stop and realize that people making videos about cake, and sports, science, and dog breeding, are getting paid more than people with master's degrees. Stop and realize that none of those people were rich celebrities when they started. Stop and think about all the people who won't start a YouTube channel or a podcast because they've naively bought into the idea that their value is based on their follower count. Or that they're supposed to blow up overnight without putting any hard work into the process. Like, imagine how much more content would be out there if people weren't afraid to create. Just something to think about.

[00:17:12] Let me move on to the next reason that YouTube is the future. You decide what you watch, when you watch it, and where you watch it. Before YouTube, you had to watch whatever was on the TV at the time. And who decided what was on TV at a particular time? The TV networks, of course. If you wanted to see a particular show, you had to be in front of a TV at a particular time. And if you missed it, then you missed it. Unless you have money and maybe you got it on DVR, right? You could…used to be able to record live TV and then watch it later. Or maybe you catch a rerun at some point, right?

[00:17:51] And if you want to watch Rick and Morty, but the network wants to show Bob's Burgers, you're either watching Bob's Burgers or nothing at all, those were your choices. And that's why Netflix wins. Your movies and shows when you want and where you want with no annoying ads or interruptions for just $7 a month. And that's why YouTube wins. Videos you want to see, when you want, and where you want for free, with the occasional annoying ad. But guess what? You can pay not to see those ads, too, if you really want. It doesn't matter if you're laying naked in bed, commuting to work on the train, working out at the gym, walking in the park, or cooking dinner. You can get access to your favorite videos and podcasts whenever and wherever you want.

[00:18:38] Now, another reason that YouTube is the future is because it learns about your viewing habits and recommends more videos. Every time you search for or click on something, YouTube learns a little more about you and your interests. YouTube then uses that data to guess which videos you would like to see in the future. It's always trying to find ways to get you to spend more time watching videos. So it's always trying to learn about what you find interesting. This means that even if you're too lazy to search for something new, YouTube will always recommend something new. From which videos you click on to the amount of time you spend watching a video, to what you do after you watch the video. YouTube is collecting data in order to create a better user experience on their platform. And also so they can show you more relevant ads, right?

[00:19:29] Now, another cool thing, another reason that YouTube is the future, another differentiator is that you can have multiple YouTube channels. If you've got enough passion about different disciplines, if you know how to build teams, and make great content, you could create multiple streams of revenue in the form of multiple channels with videos that can be found in search results and recommend it to people for years to come. All of that translates into passive income for years to come. And those, my friends, are ten reasons why YouTube is the future.

[END OF EPISODE]

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