CK #15 - The Difference Between ALL and EVERYTHING in English

September 2, 2021

'All' and 'everything' are two words that confuse learners of English. I'm gonna explain the difference between them and how we use them.

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[00:00:00] In this video, I'm going to explain the difference between the words "everything" and "all". What's up, my friend? This is Coffee with Kaizen number 15. And like I said in the intro, I'm going to explain the words everything and all because these are two words that learners of English get confused all the time. There's a very simple difference. So hopefully by the end of this episode, it will be crystal clear in your mind and you can use these words just like a native speaker.

[00:00:30] So the first thing you need to understand is that the words "everything" and "all" really have the same idea. But when you think of the word "all", I want you to think of the whole thing or the entire thing. For example, all the people or all the food or all the time. So in these examples, let's imagine a group of people. I'm talking about the entire group, the whole thing. Or in the example of the food, I'm talking about all of the food on the table, the whole table, and all of the food on it. You see? The entire thing.

[00:01:06] Now, what you need to remember is that the word all is almost always used with a noun. For example, did you eat all the pizza? Did you eat all the pizza? It's very common for learners of English to use the word "all" without a noun, probably because that's how it works in their language. For example, they might say something like, "Did you eat all?". Did you eat all? My friend, please do not use the word all without a noun. There are some exceptions. There are some cases in which you will use the word "all" without a noun, and they're rare. But I'll still give you an example.

[00:01:45] So let's imagine that you're having a conversation with somebody and they're just complaining and complaining and complaining and you're so tired of hearing it. And at the end of their speech, you know, when they finish talking, you might say something like, "Is that all?". Is that all? Right? Is that everything you wanted to say? Now, you noticed in that sentence I said "all" and "everything". And that's because in this case, the word all is functioning more like the word everything. And I'm still going to explain that word in just a second.

[00:02:13] So back to my example. Is that all? Is that all? I didn't use a noun in that case. I didn't say "all the this" or "all the that". Just said, is that all? Now, to confirm in the same example, that same situation, after you ask me, is that all? I can respond by saying, "Yes, that's all. That's all. That is all". Now, again, like I said, it kind of functions like the word "everything" in this case, because I could also say "That is everything". It's just more common, a more natural in that particular situation to say "that is all".

[00:02:49] So the rule to remember, again, is that you must use a noun with the word all, almost every single time. Like all the people, all the food, all the time, all the countries, all the something. Ok? Remember that sentence structure any time you want to use the word "all". Because in my mind, as a native English speaker, if you use the word all, naturally my brain is already asking, "All the what?". It has to be all of the something. All the what? That's naturally my question. So you need to think that way when you're going to use this word. All right?

[00:03:24] Now let's talk about the word "everything". Everything is actually a pronoun like you, me, she, we, them, etc. And what this word actually means is each and every single thing. That's what you can think of when you hear the word "everything". Every single thing or every individual thing. For example, she understands everything. So I explain 20 different things and she understands every single thing I explained. Or I could say, I left everything at home. So I own  a bunch of things. I have many possessions. I have a backpack, a camera, a phone, a passport, all of that. You see? All of that, in this case. That is the noun. So I left all of that at home. I left every single thing or everything at home. So the rule to remember here is that "everything" implies every single or every individual thing. So at the end of this explanation, I could ask you, did you understand everything?

[END OF EPISODE]

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[00:00:00] In this video, I'm going to explain the difference between the words "everything" and "all". What's up, my friend? This is Coffee with Kaizen number 15. And like I said in the intro, I'm going to explain the words everything and all because these are two words that learners of English get confused all the time. There's a very simple difference. So hopefully by the end of this episode, it will be crystal clear in your mind and you can use these words just like a native speaker.

[00:00:30] So the first thing you need to understand is that the words "everything" and "all" really have the same idea. But when you think of the word "all", I want you to think of the whole thing or the entire thing. For example, all the people or all the food or all the time. So in these examples, let's imagine a group of people. I'm talking about the entire group, the whole thing. Or in the example of the food, I'm talking about all of the food on the table, the whole table, and all of the food on it. You see? The entire thing.

[00:01:06] Now, what you need to remember is that the word all is almost always used with a noun. For example, did you eat all the pizza? Did you eat all the pizza? It's very common for learners of English to use the word "all" without a noun, probably because that's how it works in their language. For example, they might say something like, "Did you eat all?". Did you eat all? My friend, please do not use the word all without a noun. There are some exceptions. There are some cases in which you will use the word "all" without a noun, and they're rare. But I'll still give you an example.

[00:01:45] So let's imagine that you're having a conversation with somebody and they're just complaining and complaining and complaining and you're so tired of hearing it. And at the end of their speech, you know, when they finish talking, you might say something like, "Is that all?". Is that all? Right? Is that everything you wanted to say? Now, you noticed in that sentence I said "all" and "everything". And that's because in this case, the word all is functioning more like the word everything. And I'm still going to explain that word in just a second.

[00:02:13] So back to my example. Is that all? Is that all? I didn't use a noun in that case. I didn't say "all the this" or "all the that". Just said, is that all? Now, to confirm in the same example, that same situation, after you ask me, is that all? I can respond by saying, "Yes, that's all. That's all. That is all". Now, again, like I said, it kind of functions like the word "everything" in this case, because I could also say "That is everything". It's just more common, a more natural in that particular situation to say "that is all".

[00:02:49] So the rule to remember, again, is that you must use a noun with the word all, almost every single time. Like all the people, all the food, all the time, all the countries, all the something. Ok? Remember that sentence structure any time you want to use the word "all". Because in my mind, as a native English speaker, if you use the word all, naturally my brain is already asking, "All the what?". It has to be all of the something. All the what? That's naturally my question. So you need to think that way when you're going to use this word. All right?

[00:03:24] Now let's talk about the word "everything". Everything is actually a pronoun like you, me, she, we, them, etc. And what this word actually means is each and every single thing. That's what you can think of when you hear the word "everything". Every single thing or every individual thing. For example, she understands everything. So I explain 20 different things and she understands every single thing I explained. Or I could say, I left everything at home. So I own  a bunch of things. I have many possessions. I have a backpack, a camera, a phone, a passport, all of that. You see? All of that, in this case. That is the noun. So I left all of that at home. I left every single thing or everything at home. So the rule to remember here is that "everything" implies every single or every individual thing. So at the end of this explanation, I could ask you, did you understand everything?

[END OF EPISODE]

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Transcript

[00:00:00] In this video, I'm going to explain the difference between the words "everything" and "all". What's up, my friend? This is Coffee with Kaizen number 15. And like I said in the intro, I'm going to explain the words everything and all because these are two words that learners of English get confused all the time. There's a very simple difference. So hopefully by the end of this episode, it will be crystal clear in your mind and you can use these words just like a native speaker.

[00:00:30] So the first thing you need to understand is that the words "everything" and "all" really have the same idea. But when you think of the word "all", I want you to think of the whole thing or the entire thing. For example, all the people or all the food or all the time. So in these examples, let's imagine a group of people. I'm talking about the entire group, the whole thing. Or in the example of the food, I'm talking about all of the food on the table, the whole table, and all of the food on it. You see? The entire thing.

[00:01:06] Now, what you need to remember is that the word all is almost always used with a noun. For example, did you eat all the pizza? Did you eat all the pizza? It's very common for learners of English to use the word "all" without a noun, probably because that's how it works in their language. For example, they might say something like, "Did you eat all?". Did you eat all? My friend, please do not use the word all without a noun. There are some exceptions. There are some cases in which you will use the word "all" without a noun, and they're rare. But I'll still give you an example.

[00:01:45] So let's imagine that you're having a conversation with somebody and they're just complaining and complaining and complaining and you're so tired of hearing it. And at the end of their speech, you know, when they finish talking, you might say something like, "Is that all?". Is that all? Right? Is that everything you wanted to say? Now, you noticed in that sentence I said "all" and "everything". And that's because in this case, the word all is functioning more like the word everything. And I'm still going to explain that word in just a second.

[00:02:13] So back to my example. Is that all? Is that all? I didn't use a noun in that case. I didn't say "all the this" or "all the that". Just said, is that all? Now, to confirm in the same example, that same situation, after you ask me, is that all? I can respond by saying, "Yes, that's all. That's all. That is all". Now, again, like I said, it kind of functions like the word "everything" in this case, because I could also say "That is everything". It's just more common, a more natural in that particular situation to say "that is all".

[00:02:49] So the rule to remember, again, is that you must use a noun with the word all, almost every single time. Like all the people, all the food, all the time, all the countries, all the something. Ok? Remember that sentence structure any time you want to use the word "all". Because in my mind, as a native English speaker, if you use the word all, naturally my brain is already asking, "All the what?". It has to be all of the something. All the what? That's naturally my question. So you need to think that way when you're going to use this word. All right?

[00:03:24] Now let's talk about the word "everything". Everything is actually a pronoun like you, me, she, we, them, etc. And what this word actually means is each and every single thing. That's what you can think of when you hear the word "everything". Every single thing or every individual thing. For example, she understands everything. So I explain 20 different things and she understands every single thing I explained. Or I could say, I left everything at home. So I own  a bunch of things. I have many possessions. I have a backpack, a camera, a phone, a passport, all of that. You see? All of that, in this case. That is the noun. So I left all of that at home. I left every single thing or everything at home. So the rule to remember here is that "everything" implies every single or every individual thing. So at the end of this explanation, I could ask you, did you understand everything?

[END OF EPISODE]

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