CK #16 - The Difference Between JOB, WORK, and CAREER in English

September 3, 2021

Learners of English confuse the words 'job', 'work', and 'career' all the time. I'm gonna teach you the differences between the words, and a bunch of useful phrases to talk about them.

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[00:00:00] In this episode, I'm going to explain the difference between the words job, work, and career. What's up, my friend? This is Coffee with Kaizen number 16. One, six, 16. And in this episode, like I said in the intro, I'm going to explain the difference between the words job, work, and career. Because these are three words that learners of English get confused quite often because they're similar in a way, and they are all related to the same thing, but they don't mean the same thing. We don't use them in the same way. So in this episode, I'm going to teach you what they mean and exactly how we use them. Not only that, I'm also going to teach you some useful phrases that you can use in relation to your job, your work, and your career. All right? So we're not going to waste any more time. Let's get into this information.

[00:00:54] So let's start with 'job' Job is a noun, and it refers to an activity that you do to receive money. Your job can also be referred to as your profession or your occupation. Now, the money that you receive for your job is called your salary. S A L A R Y, salary. And in some cases, your salary may be referred to as your compensation. And compensation in my opinion, is just a formal word for the reward you receive in exchange for doing something. Most of the time it's work, and most of the time that reward is money. Okay? So the compensation for your job is your salary or your money, the money that you receive to do your job. All right.

[00:01:39] So when someone is looking for a job, sometimes we call this the job hunt, right? H U N T, hunt. So if you're hunting for a job, think of it in the same way that you would hunt for an animal that you're trying to eat. If you're hunting for ducks or lions or deer, bucks... I don't know what people hunt for, but you get the idea. You're searching for something that you're trying to get, in this case. You're hunting for it. So that's why we call it the job hunt. And some people also just call it the job search. So if you or a friend let's say, it's a better example, if you know that your friend is looking for a job and they have been looking for a job for a few weeks or a few months, you can ask them, "How's the job hunt going?". Hey, man! How's the job hunt going? What you're asking them is how is the process of looking for a job? Are there any updates? Is there any news? Have you found a job? What's the status? That's basically what you're asking.

[00:02:36] So if you're trying to find a job, if you're searching for a job or if you're on the job hunt, you're most likely going to go to a jobs listing website, which is simply a website where you can see a long list of all the current job openings. And job openings are basically positions that currently need to be filled at companies in your area. So if you're reading a job listing or if you talk to a company, a recruiter, an employer, or something like that, they might say "This position is opening", which means they have a job opening. It's the same thing. Now, in each job listing, you will see what we call the job requirements, which is basically the qualities, the skills, or certifications that you need to qualify for that particular job.

[00:03:21] Now, once you have found a job opening or a job listing that's interesting to you, you will most likely need to fill out or complete a job application. Now, in some cases, you will also need to send the company your CV or your resume. And just so you know, CV and resume are interchangeable. In my mind, they both mean the same thing. It's that document that lists your academic qualifications or your past jobs, your skills, what languages you speak, and things like that. Right? Now, this entire process of filling out the application and sending it to the company is what we call applying for the job. You're asking them for the job. Trying to show them that you're qualified to do that job. All right?

[00:04:02] So then you might get the opportunity to have a job interview, which is that moment when they receive your CV or your resume and they think that you might be a good candidate for the job opening or for the job position. So they call you and say, "We would like to schedule an interview", which is when you go and talk to the manager, the boss, somebody at the company that is basically going to ask you some questions about yourself and your abilities. Right? So if the company that you have applied for is interested in you, then they will call you or email you with what we call "a job offer". Right? This is when they formally tell you that they'd like you to work for them and they give you the details about your salary, the schedule, your benefits and things like that.

[00:04:47] So at this point, you can accept or decline the job offer. And if you accept the offer, you can tell all your friends and family, "I got the job. I got the job". So to get a job basically just means to secure employment. So to get a job is what I see as informal but very normal and common daily speech. To get a job. Now, to secure employment means the exact same thing, it just sounds very formal to me. It would be very, very... I mean, I want to say it would be strange, it would sound extremely formal, like strangely formal if my friend said, "Hey man, I secured employment at the company". It's like, in my experience we just don't speak like that. We would say "I got a job", which again just means I secured employment. All right? Cool.

[00:05:39] So here are some words and phrases we can use to describe your job. Number one, full-time job. A full-time job is a job at which you work 40 hours a week, right? For example, I have a full-time job and I sell clothes on the weekends. The next one, a part-time job. A part-time job is a job at which you work, maybe 20 to 25 hours a week. It's not something that you do for 8 hours a day, 5 days a week. It's most likely half that time or less. For example, I'm still studying at university, so I'm just working a part-time job. So, I have to study most of the time so I don't have enough time to work a full-time job, so I just work a part-time job.

[00:06:23] The next term on the list is a demanding job. A demanding job is a job that requires a lot of time, energy, and effort. For example, being a military soldier is a demanding job. You are constantly in mentally and physically stressful situations. The next term on the list is a fulfilling job or a rewarding job. In this case, it's essentially the same thing, a fulfilling job or a rewarding job. And that just means a job that makes you feel good. You know, maybe you don't make a lot of money doing it, and maybe you do, but that's not the point. It's a job that makes you feel good internally. It makes you happy. You know, it gives you energy. You wake up in the morning wanting to do that job, even if you don't make a lot of money because the other benefits that you get are so much more important than that, you know? So here's an example. Teaching people how to speak English is the most rewarding job I've ever had, which is basically saying out of all the jobs I've done over the years, teaching people how to speak English is the one that makes me feel the best. It's the one that makes me feel whole or complete, more so than any other job I've had before.

[00:07:37] All right. Next to him on the list is an entry-level job. An entry-level job is a job that can be done by someone who is just beginning their career, and these types of jobs don't really require much experience or skills. For example, Daniel got an entry-level job as an administrative assistant. So basically in this context, when I'm saying an entry-level job administrative assistant doesn't necessarily require years of study or certifications or, you know, very difficult skills or anything like that. Because you're most likely answering emails, filing documents, answering phones, and things like that. It's not exactly skilled work in this case, so that's why it's entry-level. You're just entering the job market or you're just starting your career. Over time, you'll gain more skills and experience and get to higher-level jobs. Ok?

[00:08:28] All right, next on the list is a dead-end job. Very useful. A dead-end job is a job that has no opportunities for advancement or promotions, right? For example, being a truck driver is a dead-end job. Being a truck driver is a dead-end job. So what this sentence is saying or what the sentence is expressing is that driving a truck for a living or driving a truck as a job doesn't really have much room to grow. There's no opportunities to advance to a higher position or make more money, learn new skills. You just kind of do the same thing every day, and that's it.

[00:09:07] So there's nowhere to go, and that's why we call it a dead-end job. Because if you're driving your car down the street and you get to a point in the street where you cannot go forward anymore. There's a barrier. There's something that's stopping you from moving forward or making progress. That's a dead end. It's the end of the street. It's dead, there's nowhere to go. So that's where the term "dead-end job" comes from because you have nowhere to go in this career. Not forward. Not upwards. Nothing. It's just you're here. This is... the job is the destination. You're not going to advance or grow whatsoever.

[00:09:41] All right. Next on the list is a high-caliber job. A high-caliber job is like a dynamic or very important job. Ok? So here's an example. After she published her book, she got a high-caliber job as a director of a national newspaper. So after she wrote and published this book, she found this very important, very powerful, high-status position at a national newspaper. You see? High caliber, high status. Most likely a lot of money. Very important position. High caliber. All right.

[00:10:15] Next on the list is a lucrative job. A lucrative job, and a lucrative job is just a job where you earn a lot of money. If something is lucrative, it means that it generates a lot of profit, a lot of money, a lot of cash, and a lot of dough, a lot of cheese. You're getting paid a lot. You know what I'm saying? You're getting paid good. Good money. So here's an example. My mother wants me to marry a guy with a lucrative job, like a doctor or a lawyer. So basically, my mom wants me to marry a rich guy, a guy that makes a lot of money, a guy that does something that pays him well. That's the idea. A lucrative job.

[00:10:52] All right. The next term on the list is day job. Day job, and a day job is a person's regular job and main source of income or main source of money. And we typically use this term in situations where we're talking about somebody has a job, but it's not necessarily their passion if they're using the word "day job", it's most likely because they do something else that they enjoy much more. For example, he pays for his independent movies with the money that he earns at his day job as a store manager. So during the day Monday to Friday, he works as a store manager and he takes part of that money to work on his real passion, which is making movies. You see? So when somebody uses the word day job, it's most likely because they're just doing that for the money or that's their career, but they have some other passion that they work on in their free time. And you might hear it in movies or podcasts or TV series or something like that.

[00:11:50] Let's imagine somebody wants to be a musician and they play music for all their friends, and it's just terrible. They're really, really bad at playing the saxophone, for example. You know, there's no way they can make a career actually being a musician, even if they want to be a professional musician and somebody in the crowd, one of their friends or family members says, "Don't quit your day job". Don't quit your day job. So basically what they're saying is do not abandon your steady job with a good paycheck, a consistent paycheck, and try to pursue a career in music. And we'll talk about the word career in just a second. So it's kind of like a joke, a cultural joke. If somebody says, "Don't quit your day job" it means you are not good enough at your passion and activity to abandon your steady job. You see? Because your skills just aren't good enough. So if you quit your job and try to pursue that, you're not going to make any money. So do not quit your day job, you know?

[00:12:45] All right. Now, the last term on the list is odd job. O D D, odd job. Now, the definition of odd job is a casual or isolated piece of work, especially one of a routine domestic or manual nature. Now, I got that definition from a dictionary, but it's not the best or the clearest definition. So an odd job is just something most of the time it's manual labor and it's something that you do one time in exchange for one payment. For example, he takes odd jobs here and there, but nothing that would lead to a career. So let's imagine I want to be a carpenter, I want to build houses. And every once in a while, a friend or a family member might ask me to build a doghouse or a bookshelf or something like that. I do it one time and they pay me one time. That's an odd job. It's not my occupation. I'm not being paid consistently to do that. It's not my career or anything like that. It's just I do it every once in a while. I do a job here, I do a job there. And that's it. Little odd jobs here and there. Hopefully, that makes sense.

[00:13:52] It's also important to remember that the word 'job' is a countable noun. For example, I work two jobs just to be able to pay my bills and feed my family. Another example, Jessica has had seven jobs in the past five years. So in both examples, it's clear that the word 'job' is countable. Two jobs, five jobs, seven jobs, twenty jobs. Ok? All right, my friend. That's it for 'job'. Hopefully, it's clear what it means, how we use it, and gave you a bunch of phrases to talk about or describe your job.

[00:14:25] So now let's talk about work. Now the word 'work' is both a noun and a verb, and it refers to... How can I say, the word 'work' is a much more general word. Job is specific, work is a general. Right? Work refers to the general efforts and activities done to accomplish a goal. Ok? So work can be done even if you don't have a job. For example, studying English is work, but it's not your job. You see? It's not the activity that you do for 40 hours a week in exchange for the money you need to pay the bills. Right? That is your job. But English is just work. I shouldn't say English. Learning English is just work. It's not your job. So I could say, if you want to become fluent in English, you have to put in the work or you have to do the work that's necessary for you to see the results. You wouldn't say if you want to learn English, you have to do the job. Although I would probably understand the idea you were trying to express, it sounds very unnatural.

[00:15:30] So here are some words and phrases that we can use when talking about work. The first one, you can say that you work at, or you can say that you work for a company. For example, I work at General Motors. I work at General Motors. So you're saying that I work at or for the company, General Motors. That's where I work or that's the company for which I work. So here's another example. I work for Adidas. Now, I could switch these two, I could switch those prepositions and they would have the same meaning. I could say I work for General Motors or I work at General Motors. No difference whatsoever. I work for Adidas or I work at Adidas. Same thing to me. Whichever one is easier for you to remember or use, use that one. All right?

[00:16:18] The next one, you can say you're working on a project or a task. So let me give you an example. I'm working on an important financial report. So the current task that has my attention is this financial report. That's what I'm working on. You wouldn't say, "I'm working at financial report". Now, there might be some exceptions where somebody says something like that. But I don't want to confuse you, and it's not something that you need to think so much about. So just remember, we work on things. I'm working on this report. I'm working on this new course. I'm working on my car. I'm working on something, a task or a project or something like that. We work on tasks. We work on projects. All right?

[00:17:03] Here's another example. I'm working on improving customer satisfaction. So my current task, my current responsibility or project, this goal I'm trying to achieve is improving customer satisfaction. That is what I'm working on. All right? The next one, you can say that you work with particular people or objects or I guess animals, right? For example, I work with pre-intermediate learners of English, so we're talking about people here. These are the people that I work with. I don't work on people. Although you could say that, it means something different and I don't want to confuse you. So we work with people or we work with things. So again, I work with pre-intermediate learners of English.

[00:17:46] Here's another example. I work with children ages 5 to 7. So maybe I'm a school teacher, an elementary school teacher, and I work with young kids ages 5 to 7. I don't work with teenagers, I don't work with dogs, I don't work with senior citizens. I work with children ages 5 to 7. All right? But you could also say, I work with hazardous chemicals, you know. I work with special needs children. Stuff like that. Ok? All right. So the word 'work' also refers to the context of your place of employment. For example, I start work at 7 a.m. I wouldn't say "I start my job at 7 a.m". You could but it just doesn't sound natural. It's much more natural to say, I start work at 7 a.m. And that can mean that you arrive at work at 7 a.m. or you start doing your job or working at 7 a.m. Hopefully, I'm not confusing you here. All right?

[00:18:47] So another example I finish or I leave work at 4:30 p.m. I wouldn't say "I finished my job at 4:30 pm every day". Just doesn't sound natural. That's not the way we use that word. So, just so you know, in that example, I said "I leave work or I finish work at 4:30". I think a much more common but also informal way to say that is "I get off work at 4:30 p.m". So to get off work just means to finish working or to leave work. I get off at 4:30. It's much more common, at least here in the United States. They'll say, What time do you work today? I start work at 7:30 in the morning. Oh, cool. What time do you get off? Which is the same thing as asking, what time do you finish, what time are you going to leave? I get off at 4:30. Ok? Cool.

[00:19:43] So another one, we go to work by car. I wouldn't say we go to our job or I go to my job by car. You could and it would make sense. It would be understandable. So don't worry about that. But just the most natural way to say that is "I go to work", right? The place where I work is also my work. I know that sounds funny, it's kind of strange. It's hard to explain. But the word 'work' refers to the effort that you make, but also the place where you make that effort. Right? The office, the store, whatever it is, that's also work. It's the location and the effort as confusing as that might be. All right? Cool.

[00:20:24] So last example, I can't access Facebook when I'm at work. You could say, I can't access Facebook when I'm at my job. But it's much more natural, much more common to say, I can't access Facebook when I'm at work. When I'm at this location doing my job I can't be on Facebook. You see? So the idea to remember is that the word 'work' is a very general word that refers to your effort and the place where you make that effort. Now, you will hear some people use the word 'job' in the same way. Like I said, for example, I was talking to this guy at my job. Now, although it makes sense when we hear it, it's technically incorrect. If you answered that question like on an English exam or something like that and you chose the word job instead of work, you would probably get that question wrong. If you said, I was talking to this guy at my job. They would be expecting you to say, I was talking to this guy at work.

[00:21:23] One last detail about work. Work is an uncountable noun, so we do not use it in the plural form. Now, there are some exceptions and I'll talk about that in just a second. But let me give you an example. I have three works to do this week. It's incorrect. We wouldn't say "I have three works to do this week". Because really what you're trying to say is you have three projects to do this week or you have three things or three tasks or three assignments to do this week. Individual things that you need to get done because you're accounting them. There's three things. But you cannot count work. So if you really want to say, for example, I have three works to do this week. You could say "I have a lot of work to do this week" because in that case you're not counting the work. It's just a lot of it. We don't know how much because we can't count them or it. We can't count work, right? So you can say, I have a lot of work to do this week or I have 10 things to do this week. 50 projects. 100 tasks. Ok?

[00:22:23] Now, the exception, like I said, the only exception that I could think of is sometimes when we're talking about artwork or literary work, we'll use the word "works" in the plural form talking about individual pieces of art. Like the works of Pablo Picasso or something like that. We're talking about all of his paintings, all of his artistic projects. Why we do that? I have no idea. But that's the only exception I could think of. So in every other case, just remember, work is uncountable. All right?

[00:22:54] Now, last but not least. Career. The word 'career' is a noun. We do not use it as a verb. And your career describes the total progression of your professional life. It can include many different jobs over many years. So you can have a career in a particular field or a particular industry. For example, I can have a career in education, or I can have a career in politics or journalism or finance or software engineering. You see? Or technology, let's say. So let's imagine that I had a twenty-year career in education. That means that I worked in that particular industry for 20 years, but I could have had multiple jobs or positions or occupations. I could have been a teacher, then a school principal, and then a consultant. Now all of these are jobs that I've done during my career in education, and all of that was very rewarding work. You see what I did there?

[00:23:59] All right. So here are some common phrases and words and things like that that we can use with 'career'. The first one, to embark on a career. Embark. E M B A R K, embark. All that means is to begin or to start a career. Now, this in my opinion, is a very formal thing to say. To embark on a career. It's quite formal, just so you know. You could just say "I'm going to start a career" or "he's at the beginning of his career". To say he's embarking on this new career, there's nothing wrong with it. It's just formal, in my opinion. So I could say "he's embarking on a new career as a writer", which again, just means he's starting his career as a writer.

[00:24:42] Now the next phrase, let's say, is to pursue a career. To pursue a career just means to make an effort to have a career in a particular industry. So I could say "she wants to pursue an acting career". And that would be the same thing, just so you know, I could also say "she wants to pursue a career in acting". So that's two sentence structures. The first one, she wants to pursue an acting career. The second one, she wants to pursue a career in acting. So you can say a technology career or a career in technology. An athletic career or a career in athletics or sports. Ok?

[00:25:24] All right. Next on the list is a promising career. A promising career is just a career with good future potential. All right? A lot of promise. It's another way of saying a lot of potential. For example, software development is looking like a promising career at the moment. And that would be the same thing as saying a career in software development seems to have a lot of potential at the moment. It's very promising. There's lots of potential.

[00:25:52] All right. Next on the list is switch your career. S W I T C H, switch or change. Ok? That's really what it means, to switch careers just means to change careers. For example, the idea of switching careers at 45 years old seems really scary to me. Right? Maybe I feel like I'm too old to start a new career, to embark on a new career. Right? And I just think the idea of switching, the idea of changing is very scary. Here's another example. Is it too late to switch my career? Is it too late to change my career? It's the exact same thing. Is it too late to switch, too late to change? Same thing.

[00:26:36] All right. Next on the list, career takes off. And this is when someone's career starts to become very, very successful. If your career takes off it means that you start to become very successful and most likely very rapidly, very fast. For example, Cristiano Ronaldo's career took off when he joined Manchester United. So at the moment he joined this new club his career took off. He became very successful very fast, very famous. His skill level went to, you know, new heights. Let's say it that way. Just took off like a rocket ship or like an airplane, something like that. Here's another example. Her music career took off after she released her second album. So her first album, people knew about her. Things were ok. But when she released that second album, her career exploded. And that's another way you can say it. Her career exploded. It took off. Things started to go very, very well for her. Ok?

[00:27:31] All right. Next on the list is at the height or at the peak of your career, and this just means at the most successful point in your career. So here's an example. At the height of his career, nobody could play better than him. So let's think about... You know I love soccer, so I'll use another soccer example. Ronaldinho, at the height of his career, at the most successful point in his career when he was playing his best football, nobody could play better than he could play. Right? Here's another example. We lost it all at the peak of our career. We lost it all at the peak of our career, which means at the highest point, the most success we had ever had, the best moment in our career we lost everything. Lost it all. Ok?

[00:28:23] Last one, ruin your career. R U I N. This just means to destroy your career. That's really what it means. So here's an example. That was the move that ruined his career. That was the decision, that was the action or whatever that destroyed his career. It ruined his career. Ok? Here's another example. She allowed her social media presence to ruin her career. So she's doing crazy things online, and you know, once you put it online, you can't really take it away, it's there forever. So somebody saw this video or that tweet or that post or whatever it was and it ruined her reputation. Maybe she lost her job or whatever. It just destroyed her professional career. That's the idea.

[00:29:13] Now it's also important to note that we don't use this word when referring to your studies. In other languages it's very common to use the word 'career' to talk about what you're studying at university. For example, I have or I did a career in medicine. This doesn't imply that you're referring to your studies at university, it implies that medicine is the industry in which you worked for an extended period of time. Right? However, you can say "my academic career" if you're referring to your overall performance in an academic setting over time. Hopefully, that's not confusing to you.

[00:29:49] So here's an example. That was the hardest exam of my academic career. That was the hardest exam of my academic career. My entire academic career, that was the hardest one. So maybe after eight years of studying to become a psychologist, you're essentially a professional student at that point. You've done nothing but study for the past eight years. You have made a career in academics, essentially. And that particular test was the hardest one of your eight-year academic career. Hopefully, that makes sense.

[00:30:23] All right, my friend. I know there was a lot of information, but hopefully, the differences between job, work, and career are clear to you now. You should also have a bunch of words and phrases to talk about your job, your work, and your career. But as always, if you have any questions, leave them in the comment section or shoot me a message and I'll get back to you as soon as I get the chance. All right? That's Coffee with Kaizen number 16 in the books. So I'll talk to you later. Peace!

[END OF EPISODE]

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[00:00:00] In this episode, I'm going to explain the difference between the words job, work, and career. What's up, my friend? This is Coffee with Kaizen number 16. One, six, 16. And in this episode, like I said in the intro, I'm going to explain the difference between the words job, work, and career. Because these are three words that learners of English get confused quite often because they're similar in a way, and they are all related to the same thing, but they don't mean the same thing. We don't use them in the same way. So in this episode, I'm going to teach you what they mean and exactly how we use them. Not only that, I'm also going to teach you some useful phrases that you can use in relation to your job, your work, and your career. All right? So we're not going to waste any more time. Let's get into this information.

[00:00:54] So let's start with 'job' Job is a noun, and it refers to an activity that you do to receive money. Your job can also be referred to as your profession or your occupation. Now, the money that you receive for your job is called your salary. S A L A R Y, salary. And in some cases, your salary may be referred to as your compensation. And compensation in my opinion, is just a formal word for the reward you receive in exchange for doing something. Most of the time it's work, and most of the time that reward is money. Okay? So the compensation for your job is your salary or your money, the money that you receive to do your job. All right.

[00:01:39] So when someone is looking for a job, sometimes we call this the job hunt, right? H U N T, hunt. So if you're hunting for a job, think of it in the same way that you would hunt for an animal that you're trying to eat. If you're hunting for ducks or lions or deer, bucks... I don't know what people hunt for, but you get the idea. You're searching for something that you're trying to get, in this case. You're hunting for it. So that's why we call it the job hunt. And some people also just call it the job search. So if you or a friend let's say, it's a better example, if you know that your friend is looking for a job and they have been looking for a job for a few weeks or a few months, you can ask them, "How's the job hunt going?". Hey, man! How's the job hunt going? What you're asking them is how is the process of looking for a job? Are there any updates? Is there any news? Have you found a job? What's the status? That's basically what you're asking.

[00:02:36] So if you're trying to find a job, if you're searching for a job or if you're on the job hunt, you're most likely going to go to a jobs listing website, which is simply a website where you can see a long list of all the current job openings. And job openings are basically positions that currently need to be filled at companies in your area. So if you're reading a job listing or if you talk to a company, a recruiter, an employer, or something like that, they might say "This position is opening", which means they have a job opening. It's the same thing. Now, in each job listing, you will see what we call the job requirements, which is basically the qualities, the skills, or certifications that you need to qualify for that particular job.

[00:03:21] Now, once you have found a job opening or a job listing that's interesting to you, you will most likely need to fill out or complete a job application. Now, in some cases, you will also need to send the company your CV or your resume. And just so you know, CV and resume are interchangeable. In my mind, they both mean the same thing. It's that document that lists your academic qualifications or your past jobs, your skills, what languages you speak, and things like that. Right? Now, this entire process of filling out the application and sending it to the company is what we call applying for the job. You're asking them for the job. Trying to show them that you're qualified to do that job. All right?

[00:04:02] So then you might get the opportunity to have a job interview, which is that moment when they receive your CV or your resume and they think that you might be a good candidate for the job opening or for the job position. So they call you and say, "We would like to schedule an interview", which is when you go and talk to the manager, the boss, somebody at the company that is basically going to ask you some questions about yourself and your abilities. Right? So if the company that you have applied for is interested in you, then they will call you or email you with what we call "a job offer". Right? This is when they formally tell you that they'd like you to work for them and they give you the details about your salary, the schedule, your benefits and things like that.

[00:04:47] So at this point, you can accept or decline the job offer. And if you accept the offer, you can tell all your friends and family, "I got the job. I got the job". So to get a job basically just means to secure employment. So to get a job is what I see as informal but very normal and common daily speech. To get a job. Now, to secure employment means the exact same thing, it just sounds very formal to me. It would be very, very... I mean, I want to say it would be strange, it would sound extremely formal, like strangely formal if my friend said, "Hey man, I secured employment at the company". It's like, in my experience we just don't speak like that. We would say "I got a job", which again just means I secured employment. All right? Cool.

[00:05:39] So here are some words and phrases we can use to describe your job. Number one, full-time job. A full-time job is a job at which you work 40 hours a week, right? For example, I have a full-time job and I sell clothes on the weekends. The next one, a part-time job. A part-time job is a job at which you work, maybe 20 to 25 hours a week. It's not something that you do for 8 hours a day, 5 days a week. It's most likely half that time or less. For example, I'm still studying at university, so I'm just working a part-time job. So, I have to study most of the time so I don't have enough time to work a full-time job, so I just work a part-time job.

[00:06:23] The next term on the list is a demanding job. A demanding job is a job that requires a lot of time, energy, and effort. For example, being a military soldier is a demanding job. You are constantly in mentally and physically stressful situations. The next term on the list is a fulfilling job or a rewarding job. In this case, it's essentially the same thing, a fulfilling job or a rewarding job. And that just means a job that makes you feel good. You know, maybe you don't make a lot of money doing it, and maybe you do, but that's not the point. It's a job that makes you feel good internally. It makes you happy. You know, it gives you energy. You wake up in the morning wanting to do that job, even if you don't make a lot of money because the other benefits that you get are so much more important than that, you know? So here's an example. Teaching people how to speak English is the most rewarding job I've ever had, which is basically saying out of all the jobs I've done over the years, teaching people how to speak English is the one that makes me feel the best. It's the one that makes me feel whole or complete, more so than any other job I've had before.

[00:07:37] All right. Next to him on the list is an entry-level job. An entry-level job is a job that can be done by someone who is just beginning their career, and these types of jobs don't really require much experience or skills. For example, Daniel got an entry-level job as an administrative assistant. So basically in this context, when I'm saying an entry-level job administrative assistant doesn't necessarily require years of study or certifications or, you know, very difficult skills or anything like that. Because you're most likely answering emails, filing documents, answering phones, and things like that. It's not exactly skilled work in this case, so that's why it's entry-level. You're just entering the job market or you're just starting your career. Over time, you'll gain more skills and experience and get to higher-level jobs. Ok?

[00:08:28] All right, next on the list is a dead-end job. Very useful. A dead-end job is a job that has no opportunities for advancement or promotions, right? For example, being a truck driver is a dead-end job. Being a truck driver is a dead-end job. So what this sentence is saying or what the sentence is expressing is that driving a truck for a living or driving a truck as a job doesn't really have much room to grow. There's no opportunities to advance to a higher position or make more money, learn new skills. You just kind of do the same thing every day, and that's it.

[00:09:07] So there's nowhere to go, and that's why we call it a dead-end job. Because if you're driving your car down the street and you get to a point in the street where you cannot go forward anymore. There's a barrier. There's something that's stopping you from moving forward or making progress. That's a dead end. It's the end of the street. It's dead, there's nowhere to go. So that's where the term "dead-end job" comes from because you have nowhere to go in this career. Not forward. Not upwards. Nothing. It's just you're here. This is... the job is the destination. You're not going to advance or grow whatsoever.

[00:09:41] All right. Next on the list is a high-caliber job. A high-caliber job is like a dynamic or very important job. Ok? So here's an example. After she published her book, she got a high-caliber job as a director of a national newspaper. So after she wrote and published this book, she found this very important, very powerful, high-status position at a national newspaper. You see? High caliber, high status. Most likely a lot of money. Very important position. High caliber. All right.

[00:10:15] Next on the list is a lucrative job. A lucrative job, and a lucrative job is just a job where you earn a lot of money. If something is lucrative, it means that it generates a lot of profit, a lot of money, a lot of cash, and a lot of dough, a lot of cheese. You're getting paid a lot. You know what I'm saying? You're getting paid good. Good money. So here's an example. My mother wants me to marry a guy with a lucrative job, like a doctor or a lawyer. So basically, my mom wants me to marry a rich guy, a guy that makes a lot of money, a guy that does something that pays him well. That's the idea. A lucrative job.

[00:10:52] All right. The next term on the list is day job. Day job, and a day job is a person's regular job and main source of income or main source of money. And we typically use this term in situations where we're talking about somebody has a job, but it's not necessarily their passion if they're using the word "day job", it's most likely because they do something else that they enjoy much more. For example, he pays for his independent movies with the money that he earns at his day job as a store manager. So during the day Monday to Friday, he works as a store manager and he takes part of that money to work on his real passion, which is making movies. You see? So when somebody uses the word day job, it's most likely because they're just doing that for the money or that's their career, but they have some other passion that they work on in their free time. And you might hear it in movies or podcasts or TV series or something like that.

[00:11:50] Let's imagine somebody wants to be a musician and they play music for all their friends, and it's just terrible. They're really, really bad at playing the saxophone, for example. You know, there's no way they can make a career actually being a musician, even if they want to be a professional musician and somebody in the crowd, one of their friends or family members says, "Don't quit your day job". Don't quit your day job. So basically what they're saying is do not abandon your steady job with a good paycheck, a consistent paycheck, and try to pursue a career in music. And we'll talk about the word career in just a second. So it's kind of like a joke, a cultural joke. If somebody says, "Don't quit your day job" it means you are not good enough at your passion and activity to abandon your steady job. You see? Because your skills just aren't good enough. So if you quit your job and try to pursue that, you're not going to make any money. So do not quit your day job, you know?

[00:12:45] All right. Now, the last term on the list is odd job. O D D, odd job. Now, the definition of odd job is a casual or isolated piece of work, especially one of a routine domestic or manual nature. Now, I got that definition from a dictionary, but it's not the best or the clearest definition. So an odd job is just something most of the time it's manual labor and it's something that you do one time in exchange for one payment. For example, he takes odd jobs here and there, but nothing that would lead to a career. So let's imagine I want to be a carpenter, I want to build houses. And every once in a while, a friend or a family member might ask me to build a doghouse or a bookshelf or something like that. I do it one time and they pay me one time. That's an odd job. It's not my occupation. I'm not being paid consistently to do that. It's not my career or anything like that. It's just I do it every once in a while. I do a job here, I do a job there. And that's it. Little odd jobs here and there. Hopefully, that makes sense.

[00:13:52] It's also important to remember that the word 'job' is a countable noun. For example, I work two jobs just to be able to pay my bills and feed my family. Another example, Jessica has had seven jobs in the past five years. So in both examples, it's clear that the word 'job' is countable. Two jobs, five jobs, seven jobs, twenty jobs. Ok? All right, my friend. That's it for 'job'. Hopefully, it's clear what it means, how we use it, and gave you a bunch of phrases to talk about or describe your job.

[00:14:25] So now let's talk about work. Now the word 'work' is both a noun and a verb, and it refers to... How can I say, the word 'work' is a much more general word. Job is specific, work is a general. Right? Work refers to the general efforts and activities done to accomplish a goal. Ok? So work can be done even if you don't have a job. For example, studying English is work, but it's not your job. You see? It's not the activity that you do for 40 hours a week in exchange for the money you need to pay the bills. Right? That is your job. But English is just work. I shouldn't say English. Learning English is just work. It's not your job. So I could say, if you want to become fluent in English, you have to put in the work or you have to do the work that's necessary for you to see the results. You wouldn't say if you want to learn English, you have to do the job. Although I would probably understand the idea you were trying to express, it sounds very unnatural.

[00:15:30] So here are some words and phrases that we can use when talking about work. The first one, you can say that you work at, or you can say that you work for a company. For example, I work at General Motors. I work at General Motors. So you're saying that I work at or for the company, General Motors. That's where I work or that's the company for which I work. So here's another example. I work for Adidas. Now, I could switch these two, I could switch those prepositions and they would have the same meaning. I could say I work for General Motors or I work at General Motors. No difference whatsoever. I work for Adidas or I work at Adidas. Same thing to me. Whichever one is easier for you to remember or use, use that one. All right?

[00:16:18] The next one, you can say you're working on a project or a task. So let me give you an example. I'm working on an important financial report. So the current task that has my attention is this financial report. That's what I'm working on. You wouldn't say, "I'm working at financial report". Now, there might be some exceptions where somebody says something like that. But I don't want to confuse you, and it's not something that you need to think so much about. So just remember, we work on things. I'm working on this report. I'm working on this new course. I'm working on my car. I'm working on something, a task or a project or something like that. We work on tasks. We work on projects. All right?

[00:17:03] Here's another example. I'm working on improving customer satisfaction. So my current task, my current responsibility or project, this goal I'm trying to achieve is improving customer satisfaction. That is what I'm working on. All right? The next one, you can say that you work with particular people or objects or I guess animals, right? For example, I work with pre-intermediate learners of English, so we're talking about people here. These are the people that I work with. I don't work on people. Although you could say that, it means something different and I don't want to confuse you. So we work with people or we work with things. So again, I work with pre-intermediate learners of English.

[00:17:46] Here's another example. I work with children ages 5 to 7. So maybe I'm a school teacher, an elementary school teacher, and I work with young kids ages 5 to 7. I don't work with teenagers, I don't work with dogs, I don't work with senior citizens. I work with children ages 5 to 7. All right? But you could also say, I work with hazardous chemicals, you know. I work with special needs children. Stuff like that. Ok? All right. So the word 'work' also refers to the context of your place of employment. For example, I start work at 7 a.m. I wouldn't say "I start my job at 7 a.m". You could but it just doesn't sound natural. It's much more natural to say, I start work at 7 a.m. And that can mean that you arrive at work at 7 a.m. or you start doing your job or working at 7 a.m. Hopefully, I'm not confusing you here. All right?

[00:18:47] So another example I finish or I leave work at 4:30 p.m. I wouldn't say "I finished my job at 4:30 pm every day". Just doesn't sound natural. That's not the way we use that word. So, just so you know, in that example, I said "I leave work or I finish work at 4:30". I think a much more common but also informal way to say that is "I get off work at 4:30 p.m". So to get off work just means to finish working or to leave work. I get off at 4:30. It's much more common, at least here in the United States. They'll say, What time do you work today? I start work at 7:30 in the morning. Oh, cool. What time do you get off? Which is the same thing as asking, what time do you finish, what time are you going to leave? I get off at 4:30. Ok? Cool.

[00:19:43] So another one, we go to work by car. I wouldn't say we go to our job or I go to my job by car. You could and it would make sense. It would be understandable. So don't worry about that. But just the most natural way to say that is "I go to work", right? The place where I work is also my work. I know that sounds funny, it's kind of strange. It's hard to explain. But the word 'work' refers to the effort that you make, but also the place where you make that effort. Right? The office, the store, whatever it is, that's also work. It's the location and the effort as confusing as that might be. All right? Cool.

[00:20:24] So last example, I can't access Facebook when I'm at work. You could say, I can't access Facebook when I'm at my job. But it's much more natural, much more common to say, I can't access Facebook when I'm at work. When I'm at this location doing my job I can't be on Facebook. You see? So the idea to remember is that the word 'work' is a very general word that refers to your effort and the place where you make that effort. Now, you will hear some people use the word 'job' in the same way. Like I said, for example, I was talking to this guy at my job. Now, although it makes sense when we hear it, it's technically incorrect. If you answered that question like on an English exam or something like that and you chose the word job instead of work, you would probably get that question wrong. If you said, I was talking to this guy at my job. They would be expecting you to say, I was talking to this guy at work.

[00:21:23] One last detail about work. Work is an uncountable noun, so we do not use it in the plural form. Now, there are some exceptions and I'll talk about that in just a second. But let me give you an example. I have three works to do this week. It's incorrect. We wouldn't say "I have three works to do this week". Because really what you're trying to say is you have three projects to do this week or you have three things or three tasks or three assignments to do this week. Individual things that you need to get done because you're accounting them. There's three things. But you cannot count work. So if you really want to say, for example, I have three works to do this week. You could say "I have a lot of work to do this week" because in that case you're not counting the work. It's just a lot of it. We don't know how much because we can't count them or it. We can't count work, right? So you can say, I have a lot of work to do this week or I have 10 things to do this week. 50 projects. 100 tasks. Ok?

[00:22:23] Now, the exception, like I said, the only exception that I could think of is sometimes when we're talking about artwork or literary work, we'll use the word "works" in the plural form talking about individual pieces of art. Like the works of Pablo Picasso or something like that. We're talking about all of his paintings, all of his artistic projects. Why we do that? I have no idea. But that's the only exception I could think of. So in every other case, just remember, work is uncountable. All right?

[00:22:54] Now, last but not least. Career. The word 'career' is a noun. We do not use it as a verb. And your career describes the total progression of your professional life. It can include many different jobs over many years. So you can have a career in a particular field or a particular industry. For example, I can have a career in education, or I can have a career in politics or journalism or finance or software engineering. You see? Or technology, let's say. So let's imagine that I had a twenty-year career in education. That means that I worked in that particular industry for 20 years, but I could have had multiple jobs or positions or occupations. I could have been a teacher, then a school principal, and then a consultant. Now all of these are jobs that I've done during my career in education, and all of that was very rewarding work. You see what I did there?

[00:23:59] All right. So here are some common phrases and words and things like that that we can use with 'career'. The first one, to embark on a career. Embark. E M B A R K, embark. All that means is to begin or to start a career. Now, this in my opinion, is a very formal thing to say. To embark on a career. It's quite formal, just so you know. You could just say "I'm going to start a career" or "he's at the beginning of his career". To say he's embarking on this new career, there's nothing wrong with it. It's just formal, in my opinion. So I could say "he's embarking on a new career as a writer", which again, just means he's starting his career as a writer.

[00:24:42] Now the next phrase, let's say, is to pursue a career. To pursue a career just means to make an effort to have a career in a particular industry. So I could say "she wants to pursue an acting career". And that would be the same thing, just so you know, I could also say "she wants to pursue a career in acting". So that's two sentence structures. The first one, she wants to pursue an acting career. The second one, she wants to pursue a career in acting. So you can say a technology career or a career in technology. An athletic career or a career in athletics or sports. Ok?

[00:25:24] All right. Next on the list is a promising career. A promising career is just a career with good future potential. All right? A lot of promise. It's another way of saying a lot of potential. For example, software development is looking like a promising career at the moment. And that would be the same thing as saying a career in software development seems to have a lot of potential at the moment. It's very promising. There's lots of potential.

[00:25:52] All right. Next on the list is switch your career. S W I T C H, switch or change. Ok? That's really what it means, to switch careers just means to change careers. For example, the idea of switching careers at 45 years old seems really scary to me. Right? Maybe I feel like I'm too old to start a new career, to embark on a new career. Right? And I just think the idea of switching, the idea of changing is very scary. Here's another example. Is it too late to switch my career? Is it too late to change my career? It's the exact same thing. Is it too late to switch, too late to change? Same thing.

[00:26:36] All right. Next on the list, career takes off. And this is when someone's career starts to become very, very successful. If your career takes off it means that you start to become very successful and most likely very rapidly, very fast. For example, Cristiano Ronaldo's career took off when he joined Manchester United. So at the moment he joined this new club his career took off. He became very successful very fast, very famous. His skill level went to, you know, new heights. Let's say it that way. Just took off like a rocket ship or like an airplane, something like that. Here's another example. Her music career took off after she released her second album. So her first album, people knew about her. Things were ok. But when she released that second album, her career exploded. And that's another way you can say it. Her career exploded. It took off. Things started to go very, very well for her. Ok?

[00:27:31] All right. Next on the list is at the height or at the peak of your career, and this just means at the most successful point in your career. So here's an example. At the height of his career, nobody could play better than him. So let's think about... You know I love soccer, so I'll use another soccer example. Ronaldinho, at the height of his career, at the most successful point in his career when he was playing his best football, nobody could play better than he could play. Right? Here's another example. We lost it all at the peak of our career. We lost it all at the peak of our career, which means at the highest point, the most success we had ever had, the best moment in our career we lost everything. Lost it all. Ok?

[00:28:23] Last one, ruin your career. R U I N. This just means to destroy your career. That's really what it means. So here's an example. That was the move that ruined his career. That was the decision, that was the action or whatever that destroyed his career. It ruined his career. Ok? Here's another example. She allowed her social media presence to ruin her career. So she's doing crazy things online, and you know, once you put it online, you can't really take it away, it's there forever. So somebody saw this video or that tweet or that post or whatever it was and it ruined her reputation. Maybe she lost her job or whatever. It just destroyed her professional career. That's the idea.

[00:29:13] Now it's also important to note that we don't use this word when referring to your studies. In other languages it's very common to use the word 'career' to talk about what you're studying at university. For example, I have or I did a career in medicine. This doesn't imply that you're referring to your studies at university, it implies that medicine is the industry in which you worked for an extended period of time. Right? However, you can say "my academic career" if you're referring to your overall performance in an academic setting over time. Hopefully, that's not confusing to you.

[00:29:49] So here's an example. That was the hardest exam of my academic career. That was the hardest exam of my academic career. My entire academic career, that was the hardest one. So maybe after eight years of studying to become a psychologist, you're essentially a professional student at that point. You've done nothing but study for the past eight years. You have made a career in academics, essentially. And that particular test was the hardest one of your eight-year academic career. Hopefully, that makes sense.

[00:30:23] All right, my friend. I know there was a lot of information, but hopefully, the differences between job, work, and career are clear to you now. You should also have a bunch of words and phrases to talk about your job, your work, and your career. But as always, if you have any questions, leave them in the comment section or shoot me a message and I'll get back to you as soon as I get the chance. All right? That's Coffee with Kaizen number 16 in the books. So I'll talk to you later. Peace!

[END OF EPISODE]

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Transcript

[00:00:00] In this episode, I'm going to explain the difference between the words job, work, and career. What's up, my friend? This is Coffee with Kaizen number 16. One, six, 16. And in this episode, like I said in the intro, I'm going to explain the difference between the words job, work, and career. Because these are three words that learners of English get confused quite often because they're similar in a way, and they are all related to the same thing, but they don't mean the same thing. We don't use them in the same way. So in this episode, I'm going to teach you what they mean and exactly how we use them. Not only that, I'm also going to teach you some useful phrases that you can use in relation to your job, your work, and your career. All right? So we're not going to waste any more time. Let's get into this information.

[00:00:54] So let's start with 'job' Job is a noun, and it refers to an activity that you do to receive money. Your job can also be referred to as your profession or your occupation. Now, the money that you receive for your job is called your salary. S A L A R Y, salary. And in some cases, your salary may be referred to as your compensation. And compensation in my opinion, is just a formal word for the reward you receive in exchange for doing something. Most of the time it's work, and most of the time that reward is money. Okay? So the compensation for your job is your salary or your money, the money that you receive to do your job. All right.

[00:01:39] So when someone is looking for a job, sometimes we call this the job hunt, right? H U N T, hunt. So if you're hunting for a job, think of it in the same way that you would hunt for an animal that you're trying to eat. If you're hunting for ducks or lions or deer, bucks... I don't know what people hunt for, but you get the idea. You're searching for something that you're trying to get, in this case. You're hunting for it. So that's why we call it the job hunt. And some people also just call it the job search. So if you or a friend let's say, it's a better example, if you know that your friend is looking for a job and they have been looking for a job for a few weeks or a few months, you can ask them, "How's the job hunt going?". Hey, man! How's the job hunt going? What you're asking them is how is the process of looking for a job? Are there any updates? Is there any news? Have you found a job? What's the status? That's basically what you're asking.

[00:02:36] So if you're trying to find a job, if you're searching for a job or if you're on the job hunt, you're most likely going to go to a jobs listing website, which is simply a website where you can see a long list of all the current job openings. And job openings are basically positions that currently need to be filled at companies in your area. So if you're reading a job listing or if you talk to a company, a recruiter, an employer, or something like that, they might say "This position is opening", which means they have a job opening. It's the same thing. Now, in each job listing, you will see what we call the job requirements, which is basically the qualities, the skills, or certifications that you need to qualify for that particular job.

[00:03:21] Now, once you have found a job opening or a job listing that's interesting to you, you will most likely need to fill out or complete a job application. Now, in some cases, you will also need to send the company your CV or your resume. And just so you know, CV and resume are interchangeable. In my mind, they both mean the same thing. It's that document that lists your academic qualifications or your past jobs, your skills, what languages you speak, and things like that. Right? Now, this entire process of filling out the application and sending it to the company is what we call applying for the job. You're asking them for the job. Trying to show them that you're qualified to do that job. All right?

[00:04:02] So then you might get the opportunity to have a job interview, which is that moment when they receive your CV or your resume and they think that you might be a good candidate for the job opening or for the job position. So they call you and say, "We would like to schedule an interview", which is when you go and talk to the manager, the boss, somebody at the company that is basically going to ask you some questions about yourself and your abilities. Right? So if the company that you have applied for is interested in you, then they will call you or email you with what we call "a job offer". Right? This is when they formally tell you that they'd like you to work for them and they give you the details about your salary, the schedule, your benefits and things like that.

[00:04:47] So at this point, you can accept or decline the job offer. And if you accept the offer, you can tell all your friends and family, "I got the job. I got the job". So to get a job basically just means to secure employment. So to get a job is what I see as informal but very normal and common daily speech. To get a job. Now, to secure employment means the exact same thing, it just sounds very formal to me. It would be very, very... I mean, I want to say it would be strange, it would sound extremely formal, like strangely formal if my friend said, "Hey man, I secured employment at the company". It's like, in my experience we just don't speak like that. We would say "I got a job", which again just means I secured employment. All right? Cool.

[00:05:39] So here are some words and phrases we can use to describe your job. Number one, full-time job. A full-time job is a job at which you work 40 hours a week, right? For example, I have a full-time job and I sell clothes on the weekends. The next one, a part-time job. A part-time job is a job at which you work, maybe 20 to 25 hours a week. It's not something that you do for 8 hours a day, 5 days a week. It's most likely half that time or less. For example, I'm still studying at university, so I'm just working a part-time job. So, I have to study most of the time so I don't have enough time to work a full-time job, so I just work a part-time job.

[00:06:23] The next term on the list is a demanding job. A demanding job is a job that requires a lot of time, energy, and effort. For example, being a military soldier is a demanding job. You are constantly in mentally and physically stressful situations. The next term on the list is a fulfilling job or a rewarding job. In this case, it's essentially the same thing, a fulfilling job or a rewarding job. And that just means a job that makes you feel good. You know, maybe you don't make a lot of money doing it, and maybe you do, but that's not the point. It's a job that makes you feel good internally. It makes you happy. You know, it gives you energy. You wake up in the morning wanting to do that job, even if you don't make a lot of money because the other benefits that you get are so much more important than that, you know? So here's an example. Teaching people how to speak English is the most rewarding job I've ever had, which is basically saying out of all the jobs I've done over the years, teaching people how to speak English is the one that makes me feel the best. It's the one that makes me feel whole or complete, more so than any other job I've had before.

[00:07:37] All right. Next to him on the list is an entry-level job. An entry-level job is a job that can be done by someone who is just beginning their career, and these types of jobs don't really require much experience or skills. For example, Daniel got an entry-level job as an administrative assistant. So basically in this context, when I'm saying an entry-level job administrative assistant doesn't necessarily require years of study or certifications or, you know, very difficult skills or anything like that. Because you're most likely answering emails, filing documents, answering phones, and things like that. It's not exactly skilled work in this case, so that's why it's entry-level. You're just entering the job market or you're just starting your career. Over time, you'll gain more skills and experience and get to higher-level jobs. Ok?

[00:08:28] All right, next on the list is a dead-end job. Very useful. A dead-end job is a job that has no opportunities for advancement or promotions, right? For example, being a truck driver is a dead-end job. Being a truck driver is a dead-end job. So what this sentence is saying or what the sentence is expressing is that driving a truck for a living or driving a truck as a job doesn't really have much room to grow. There's no opportunities to advance to a higher position or make more money, learn new skills. You just kind of do the same thing every day, and that's it.

[00:09:07] So there's nowhere to go, and that's why we call it a dead-end job. Because if you're driving your car down the street and you get to a point in the street where you cannot go forward anymore. There's a barrier. There's something that's stopping you from moving forward or making progress. That's a dead end. It's the end of the street. It's dead, there's nowhere to go. So that's where the term "dead-end job" comes from because you have nowhere to go in this career. Not forward. Not upwards. Nothing. It's just you're here. This is... the job is the destination. You're not going to advance or grow whatsoever.

[00:09:41] All right. Next on the list is a high-caliber job. A high-caliber job is like a dynamic or very important job. Ok? So here's an example. After she published her book, she got a high-caliber job as a director of a national newspaper. So after she wrote and published this book, she found this very important, very powerful, high-status position at a national newspaper. You see? High caliber, high status. Most likely a lot of money. Very important position. High caliber. All right.

[00:10:15] Next on the list is a lucrative job. A lucrative job, and a lucrative job is just a job where you earn a lot of money. If something is lucrative, it means that it generates a lot of profit, a lot of money, a lot of cash, and a lot of dough, a lot of cheese. You're getting paid a lot. You know what I'm saying? You're getting paid good. Good money. So here's an example. My mother wants me to marry a guy with a lucrative job, like a doctor or a lawyer. So basically, my mom wants me to marry a rich guy, a guy that makes a lot of money, a guy that does something that pays him well. That's the idea. A lucrative job.

[00:10:52] All right. The next term on the list is day job. Day job, and a day job is a person's regular job and main source of income or main source of money. And we typically use this term in situations where we're talking about somebody has a job, but it's not necessarily their passion if they're using the word "day job", it's most likely because they do something else that they enjoy much more. For example, he pays for his independent movies with the money that he earns at his day job as a store manager. So during the day Monday to Friday, he works as a store manager and he takes part of that money to work on his real passion, which is making movies. You see? So when somebody uses the word day job, it's most likely because they're just doing that for the money or that's their career, but they have some other passion that they work on in their free time. And you might hear it in movies or podcasts or TV series or something like that.

[00:11:50] Let's imagine somebody wants to be a musician and they play music for all their friends, and it's just terrible. They're really, really bad at playing the saxophone, for example. You know, there's no way they can make a career actually being a musician, even if they want to be a professional musician and somebody in the crowd, one of their friends or family members says, "Don't quit your day job". Don't quit your day job. So basically what they're saying is do not abandon your steady job with a good paycheck, a consistent paycheck, and try to pursue a career in music. And we'll talk about the word career in just a second. So it's kind of like a joke, a cultural joke. If somebody says, "Don't quit your day job" it means you are not good enough at your passion and activity to abandon your steady job. You see? Because your skills just aren't good enough. So if you quit your job and try to pursue that, you're not going to make any money. So do not quit your day job, you know?

[00:12:45] All right. Now, the last term on the list is odd job. O D D, odd job. Now, the definition of odd job is a casual or isolated piece of work, especially one of a routine domestic or manual nature. Now, I got that definition from a dictionary, but it's not the best or the clearest definition. So an odd job is just something most of the time it's manual labor and it's something that you do one time in exchange for one payment. For example, he takes odd jobs here and there, but nothing that would lead to a career. So let's imagine I want to be a carpenter, I want to build houses. And every once in a while, a friend or a family member might ask me to build a doghouse or a bookshelf or something like that. I do it one time and they pay me one time. That's an odd job. It's not my occupation. I'm not being paid consistently to do that. It's not my career or anything like that. It's just I do it every once in a while. I do a job here, I do a job there. And that's it. Little odd jobs here and there. Hopefully, that makes sense.

[00:13:52] It's also important to remember that the word 'job' is a countable noun. For example, I work two jobs just to be able to pay my bills and feed my family. Another example, Jessica has had seven jobs in the past five years. So in both examples, it's clear that the word 'job' is countable. Two jobs, five jobs, seven jobs, twenty jobs. Ok? All right, my friend. That's it for 'job'. Hopefully, it's clear what it means, how we use it, and gave you a bunch of phrases to talk about or describe your job.

[00:14:25] So now let's talk about work. Now the word 'work' is both a noun and a verb, and it refers to... How can I say, the word 'work' is a much more general word. Job is specific, work is a general. Right? Work refers to the general efforts and activities done to accomplish a goal. Ok? So work can be done even if you don't have a job. For example, studying English is work, but it's not your job. You see? It's not the activity that you do for 40 hours a week in exchange for the money you need to pay the bills. Right? That is your job. But English is just work. I shouldn't say English. Learning English is just work. It's not your job. So I could say, if you want to become fluent in English, you have to put in the work or you have to do the work that's necessary for you to see the results. You wouldn't say if you want to learn English, you have to do the job. Although I would probably understand the idea you were trying to express, it sounds very unnatural.

[00:15:30] So here are some words and phrases that we can use when talking about work. The first one, you can say that you work at, or you can say that you work for a company. For example, I work at General Motors. I work at General Motors. So you're saying that I work at or for the company, General Motors. That's where I work or that's the company for which I work. So here's another example. I work for Adidas. Now, I could switch these two, I could switch those prepositions and they would have the same meaning. I could say I work for General Motors or I work at General Motors. No difference whatsoever. I work for Adidas or I work at Adidas. Same thing to me. Whichever one is easier for you to remember or use, use that one. All right?

[00:16:18] The next one, you can say you're working on a project or a task. So let me give you an example. I'm working on an important financial report. So the current task that has my attention is this financial report. That's what I'm working on. You wouldn't say, "I'm working at financial report". Now, there might be some exceptions where somebody says something like that. But I don't want to confuse you, and it's not something that you need to think so much about. So just remember, we work on things. I'm working on this report. I'm working on this new course. I'm working on my car. I'm working on something, a task or a project or something like that. We work on tasks. We work on projects. All right?

[00:17:03] Here's another example. I'm working on improving customer satisfaction. So my current task, my current responsibility or project, this goal I'm trying to achieve is improving customer satisfaction. That is what I'm working on. All right? The next one, you can say that you work with particular people or objects or I guess animals, right? For example, I work with pre-intermediate learners of English, so we're talking about people here. These are the people that I work with. I don't work on people. Although you could say that, it means something different and I don't want to confuse you. So we work with people or we work with things. So again, I work with pre-intermediate learners of English.

[00:17:46] Here's another example. I work with children ages 5 to 7. So maybe I'm a school teacher, an elementary school teacher, and I work with young kids ages 5 to 7. I don't work with teenagers, I don't work with dogs, I don't work with senior citizens. I work with children ages 5 to 7. All right? But you could also say, I work with hazardous chemicals, you know. I work with special needs children. Stuff like that. Ok? All right. So the word 'work' also refers to the context of your place of employment. For example, I start work at 7 a.m. I wouldn't say "I start my job at 7 a.m". You could but it just doesn't sound natural. It's much more natural to say, I start work at 7 a.m. And that can mean that you arrive at work at 7 a.m. or you start doing your job or working at 7 a.m. Hopefully, I'm not confusing you here. All right?

[00:18:47] So another example I finish or I leave work at 4:30 p.m. I wouldn't say "I finished my job at 4:30 pm every day". Just doesn't sound natural. That's not the way we use that word. So, just so you know, in that example, I said "I leave work or I finish work at 4:30". I think a much more common but also informal way to say that is "I get off work at 4:30 p.m". So to get off work just means to finish working or to leave work. I get off at 4:30. It's much more common, at least here in the United States. They'll say, What time do you work today? I start work at 7:30 in the morning. Oh, cool. What time do you get off? Which is the same thing as asking, what time do you finish, what time are you going to leave? I get off at 4:30. Ok? Cool.

[00:19:43] So another one, we go to work by car. I wouldn't say we go to our job or I go to my job by car. You could and it would make sense. It would be understandable. So don't worry about that. But just the most natural way to say that is "I go to work", right? The place where I work is also my work. I know that sounds funny, it's kind of strange. It's hard to explain. But the word 'work' refers to the effort that you make, but also the place where you make that effort. Right? The office, the store, whatever it is, that's also work. It's the location and the effort as confusing as that might be. All right? Cool.

[00:20:24] So last example, I can't access Facebook when I'm at work. You could say, I can't access Facebook when I'm at my job. But it's much more natural, much more common to say, I can't access Facebook when I'm at work. When I'm at this location doing my job I can't be on Facebook. You see? So the idea to remember is that the word 'work' is a very general word that refers to your effort and the place where you make that effort. Now, you will hear some people use the word 'job' in the same way. Like I said, for example, I was talking to this guy at my job. Now, although it makes sense when we hear it, it's technically incorrect. If you answered that question like on an English exam or something like that and you chose the word job instead of work, you would probably get that question wrong. If you said, I was talking to this guy at my job. They would be expecting you to say, I was talking to this guy at work.

[00:21:23] One last detail about work. Work is an uncountable noun, so we do not use it in the plural form. Now, there are some exceptions and I'll talk about that in just a second. But let me give you an example. I have three works to do this week. It's incorrect. We wouldn't say "I have three works to do this week". Because really what you're trying to say is you have three projects to do this week or you have three things or three tasks or three assignments to do this week. Individual things that you need to get done because you're accounting them. There's three things. But you cannot count work. So if you really want to say, for example, I have three works to do this week. You could say "I have a lot of work to do this week" because in that case you're not counting the work. It's just a lot of it. We don't know how much because we can't count them or it. We can't count work, right? So you can say, I have a lot of work to do this week or I have 10 things to do this week. 50 projects. 100 tasks. Ok?

[00:22:23] Now, the exception, like I said, the only exception that I could think of is sometimes when we're talking about artwork or literary work, we'll use the word "works" in the plural form talking about individual pieces of art. Like the works of Pablo Picasso or something like that. We're talking about all of his paintings, all of his artistic projects. Why we do that? I have no idea. But that's the only exception I could think of. So in every other case, just remember, work is uncountable. All right?

[00:22:54] Now, last but not least. Career. The word 'career' is a noun. We do not use it as a verb. And your career describes the total progression of your professional life. It can include many different jobs over many years. So you can have a career in a particular field or a particular industry. For example, I can have a career in education, or I can have a career in politics or journalism or finance or software engineering. You see? Or technology, let's say. So let's imagine that I had a twenty-year career in education. That means that I worked in that particular industry for 20 years, but I could have had multiple jobs or positions or occupations. I could have been a teacher, then a school principal, and then a consultant. Now all of these are jobs that I've done during my career in education, and all of that was very rewarding work. You see what I did there?

[00:23:59] All right. So here are some common phrases and words and things like that that we can use with 'career'. The first one, to embark on a career. Embark. E M B A R K, embark. All that means is to begin or to start a career. Now, this in my opinion, is a very formal thing to say. To embark on a career. It's quite formal, just so you know. You could just say "I'm going to start a career" or "he's at the beginning of his career". To say he's embarking on this new career, there's nothing wrong with it. It's just formal, in my opinion. So I could say "he's embarking on a new career as a writer", which again, just means he's starting his career as a writer.

[00:24:42] Now the next phrase, let's say, is to pursue a career. To pursue a career just means to make an effort to have a career in a particular industry. So I could say "she wants to pursue an acting career". And that would be the same thing, just so you know, I could also say "she wants to pursue a career in acting". So that's two sentence structures. The first one, she wants to pursue an acting career. The second one, she wants to pursue a career in acting. So you can say a technology career or a career in technology. An athletic career or a career in athletics or sports. Ok?

[00:25:24] All right. Next on the list is a promising career. A promising career is just a career with good future potential. All right? A lot of promise. It's another way of saying a lot of potential. For example, software development is looking like a promising career at the moment. And that would be the same thing as saying a career in software development seems to have a lot of potential at the moment. It's very promising. There's lots of potential.

[00:25:52] All right. Next on the list is switch your career. S W I T C H, switch or change. Ok? That's really what it means, to switch careers just means to change careers. For example, the idea of switching careers at 45 years old seems really scary to me. Right? Maybe I feel like I'm too old to start a new career, to embark on a new career. Right? And I just think the idea of switching, the idea of changing is very scary. Here's another example. Is it too late to switch my career? Is it too late to change my career? It's the exact same thing. Is it too late to switch, too late to change? Same thing.

[00:26:36] All right. Next on the list, career takes off. And this is when someone's career starts to become very, very successful. If your career takes off it means that you start to become very successful and most likely very rapidly, very fast. For example, Cristiano Ronaldo's career took off when he joined Manchester United. So at the moment he joined this new club his career took off. He became very successful very fast, very famous. His skill level went to, you know, new heights. Let's say it that way. Just took off like a rocket ship or like an airplane, something like that. Here's another example. Her music career took off after she released her second album. So her first album, people knew about her. Things were ok. But when she released that second album, her career exploded. And that's another way you can say it. Her career exploded. It took off. Things started to go very, very well for her. Ok?

[00:27:31] All right. Next on the list is at the height or at the peak of your career, and this just means at the most successful point in your career. So here's an example. At the height of his career, nobody could play better than him. So let's think about... You know I love soccer, so I'll use another soccer example. Ronaldinho, at the height of his career, at the most successful point in his career when he was playing his best football, nobody could play better than he could play. Right? Here's another example. We lost it all at the peak of our career. We lost it all at the peak of our career, which means at the highest point, the most success we had ever had, the best moment in our career we lost everything. Lost it all. Ok?

[00:28:23] Last one, ruin your career. R U I N. This just means to destroy your career. That's really what it means. So here's an example. That was the move that ruined his career. That was the decision, that was the action or whatever that destroyed his career. It ruined his career. Ok? Here's another example. She allowed her social media presence to ruin her career. So she's doing crazy things online, and you know, once you put it online, you can't really take it away, it's there forever. So somebody saw this video or that tweet or that post or whatever it was and it ruined her reputation. Maybe she lost her job or whatever. It just destroyed her professional career. That's the idea.

[00:29:13] Now it's also important to note that we don't use this word when referring to your studies. In other languages it's very common to use the word 'career' to talk about what you're studying at university. For example, I have or I did a career in medicine. This doesn't imply that you're referring to your studies at university, it implies that medicine is the industry in which you worked for an extended period of time. Right? However, you can say "my academic career" if you're referring to your overall performance in an academic setting over time. Hopefully, that's not confusing to you.

[00:29:49] So here's an example. That was the hardest exam of my academic career. That was the hardest exam of my academic career. My entire academic career, that was the hardest one. So maybe after eight years of studying to become a psychologist, you're essentially a professional student at that point. You've done nothing but study for the past eight years. You have made a career in academics, essentially. And that particular test was the hardest one of your eight-year academic career. Hopefully, that makes sense.

[00:30:23] All right, my friend. I know there was a lot of information, but hopefully, the differences between job, work, and career are clear to you now. You should also have a bunch of words and phrases to talk about your job, your work, and your career. But as always, if you have any questions, leave them in the comment section or shoot me a message and I'll get back to you as soon as I get the chance. All right? That's Coffee with Kaizen number 16 in the books. So I'll talk to you later. Peace!

[END OF EPISODE]

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