CK #17 - English Phrase: AT ALL

September 6, 2021

After explaining the difference between 'all' and 'everything', I got a lot of questions about the phrase 'at all'. Listen to learn about the meaning of this phrase and how we use it.

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[00:00:00] In this episode, I'm going to explain the English phrase "at all". What's up, my friend? This is Coffee with Kaizen number 17. And we're going to be talking about the English phrase "at all". Now, in the last episode number 16, I explained the difference, or I did my best to explain the difference between the words "everything" and "all". Immediately after I posted that episode, I got a lot of questions about the English phrase "at all". So that's what I'm going to explain to you today.

[00:00:33] Now, this phrase really isn't something that you can think about logically because on the surface the words at all really don't make any sense. You know what I'm saying? It's only when you put them in a complete sentence that they have any real meaning. Now, there are exceptions. There are always exceptions in the English language, and do not forget it. All right? There are some exceptions, some cases in which you can simply say the words at all, and it would make sense. But I'll talk about that in a little bit because I don't want to confuse you from the jump or from the beginning, you know, right in the beginning of the transmission. Hopefully, that makes sense. All right?

[00:01:08] So first, we use this phrase "at all" in two main ways. Now, there are more than two ways, there's really three or four. But I'm going to first explain the two main ways, the most common ways that you need to learn. Number one, to put emphasis on negative sentences or, in other words, to make them stronger. That's how we use the phrase at all. Number two, to put emphasis on questions when we're trying to see if something is true or not. Okay? So "at all" really means even a little bit or in any way or even slightly. And usually we put "at all" at the end of a question or sentence. However, there are some cases in which we will use "at all" right before an adjective. Okay? Hopefully, I'm not confusing you. I am going to give you plenty of examples. So I hope, my goal here is that by the end of the transmission, it'll be clear, it'll be easier to understand and not harder. You know what I'm saying? So let's see how this goes.

[00:02:07] So let's start with the first way that we use this phrase, to put emphasis on negative sentences or to make them stronger. Here's an example, I don't like him at all. I don't like him at all. Okay? So this is a negative phrase. I do not like him at all. And it would be totally fine if you said, "I don't like him". There's nothing wrong with that. However, when you add "at all" to the end of your sentence, you're just putting emphasis on the fact that you really do not like this person. I don't like him at all. It's essentially the same thing as saying, "I don't like him, not even a little bit". I don't like him even a little bit, not in the slightest. Not at all. Okay? So when someone says "not at all", they're essentially saying not even a little bit. Like, 0%. Not 1 or 2, just not at all. All right? I'm sure you get the point.

[00:03:01] So here's another example, they're not giving us any money at all. They're not giving us any money at all. Another negative sentence. They are not giving us any money, not even a little bit. Not a single dollar. No money at all. Okay? Another example, that makes no sense at all. So maybe I'm explaining this to you right now and you're like, "Tony, bro, that shit makes no sense at all". Really what you're saying is that doesn't even make a little bit of sense. It makes zero sense or absolutely no sense, right? It makes no sense whatsoever. That's the point. All right? 

[00:03:38] Another example, you haven't made any effort at all. You haven't made any effort at all, bro. And what you're saying is you haven't made the slightest bit of effort. Not even a little bit. Absolutely no effort. Another example, I'm not at all tired. I'm not at all tired. I'm not at all tired. Now, this is an example of putting the phrase before an adjective and not at the end of the sentence. So you're really just putting emphasis on the fact that you're not even a little bit tired. That's really what you're saying. So you could say, I'm not tired at all. And it would literally be the same thing. So that's something that I don't think you need to pay too much attention to or try to learn how to speak that way. It's just so that you understand most of the time we put "at all" at the end of the sentence. But there are times when we put it right before an adjective to put emphasis on that adjective. Okay? It's a little more advanced, so don't worry too much about it.

[00:04:32] Now, you can also use this as a response, this phrase "at all", you can use it as a response when someone asks you a question. For example, your friend might ask you, "You don't care, do you?". Like, "Man, you don't care, do you?". And you can respond by saying, "No, not at all". Right? No, I don't care, not at all. Not even a little bit. I don't care in the slightest, whatsoever. You see? Now, let's talk about the second way we use this phrase, which is to put emphasis on questions when we're trying to see if something is true or not true. Here's an example, has the situation improved at all? Has the situation improved at all? This question is basically or it's not basically, it's actually the same thing as asking, has the situation improved even slightly or even a little bit, or is it exactly the same as it was the last time I asked you? Has it improved at all? A little bit? To some extent? You see what I'm saying?

[00:05:34] Here's another example, do you love me at all? Do you love me at all? Do you? Do you love me at all? So what you're asking in that question is, do you love me even a little bit? Do you love me to any extent? Right? Do you love me even slightly? That's the idea here. All right? One more example, do you have any money at all? Do you have any money at all? So again, you're asking, do you have even a little bit of money? Are you saying that you don't have one single dollar? You have no money at all? Right? Now, remember when I said there are some cases in which you can say "at all" and nothing more and it would make sense. So here's an example. Let's imagine that your friend is talking about a situation and they tell you "The situation has not improved". And if you're trying to... If you're surprised by that, you can say "At all?". Right? 

[00:06:29] So let me say it again. Hopefully, it'll make sense when I say a little bit faster. Person number one says, "The situation hasn't improved" and you respond by saying "At all?". Like, really? And really what you're asking or that's a shorter form of the complete phrase, which is "not at all". Because you're saying like, "Really? Has not improved even a little bit? Not at all? Not even in the slightest? It's exactly the same?". So that's the case in which you can just say "At all?" and you're asking, like, "Not even a little bit?". You see what I'm saying? Again, if that's confusing to you or it's like, hard to remember, don't worry too much about it. I just want the explanation to be clear. I didn't want to leave anything out because you will hear stuff like this, you know, from time to time at least here in the U.S. All right?

[00:07:12] Now there are some other more advanced ways to use this phrase "at all", and that is in conditional sentences. All right? So let me give you an example. If you loved me at all, you would help me. If you love me at all, you would help me. Now, although that's a very manipulative thing to say to somebody, it makes perfect grammatical sense. And what you're saying is if you loved me even a little bit, then you would help me. Right? Another example, if he had studied at all, he would have passed the exam. If he had studied at all, he would have passed the exam. So again, he's saying if he would have studied just a little bit to any extent, he would have passed the exam. But since he did not study for the exam, he didn't pass. All right? 

[00:07:59] One more example, if you have any problems at all, just call me and I'll take care of it. If you have any problems at all, just call me and I'll take care of it. So what I'm saying is if you have even the slightest problem, if you have any problems whatsoever just call me. So in the first two examples, you're essentially saying, if this thing were true, then this other thing would have happened or would happen in the present or the future. Right? So you're saying, if you loved me, then you would help me. If your love for me was true, then you would do this. The second example, if he had done this then this other thing would have happened. The third example, you're essentially saying, if this thing happens, then this other thing will happen. So if you have any problems at all, then I will help you. I will take care of it. All right? Cool.

[00:08:52] Now, although the third way that we use the phrase "at all" is a little more advanced and a little less common in everyday situations, you will hear it from time to time. So hopefully after hearing the explanation of the phrase and the examples of the other two ways to use this phrase, you can understand the idea. You know? The true meaning of the phrase "at all". Which is essentially, you know, even a little bit or to some extent or in any way or even slightly or whatsoever. Okay? Hopefully, hopefully that makes sense. Hopefully, you understand more now than you did before you started listening to the podcast. But like I always say, man, feel free to send me your questions. If you're watching this on YouTube leave a comment below if the explanation wasn't clear. All right? But that's Coffee with Kaizen number 17 in the books. So I'll talk to you tomorrow. Peace!

[END OF EPISODE]

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[00:00:00] In this episode, I'm going to explain the English phrase "at all". What's up, my friend? This is Coffee with Kaizen number 17. And we're going to be talking about the English phrase "at all". Now, in the last episode number 16, I explained the difference, or I did my best to explain the difference between the words "everything" and "all". Immediately after I posted that episode, I got a lot of questions about the English phrase "at all". So that's what I'm going to explain to you today.

[00:00:33] Now, this phrase really isn't something that you can think about logically because on the surface the words at all really don't make any sense. You know what I'm saying? It's only when you put them in a complete sentence that they have any real meaning. Now, there are exceptions. There are always exceptions in the English language, and do not forget it. All right? There are some exceptions, some cases in which you can simply say the words at all, and it would make sense. But I'll talk about that in a little bit because I don't want to confuse you from the jump or from the beginning, you know, right in the beginning of the transmission. Hopefully, that makes sense. All right?

[00:01:08] So first, we use this phrase "at all" in two main ways. Now, there are more than two ways, there's really three or four. But I'm going to first explain the two main ways, the most common ways that you need to learn. Number one, to put emphasis on negative sentences or, in other words, to make them stronger. That's how we use the phrase at all. Number two, to put emphasis on questions when we're trying to see if something is true or not. Okay? So "at all" really means even a little bit or in any way or even slightly. And usually we put "at all" at the end of a question or sentence. However, there are some cases in which we will use "at all" right before an adjective. Okay? Hopefully, I'm not confusing you. I am going to give you plenty of examples. So I hope, my goal here is that by the end of the transmission, it'll be clear, it'll be easier to understand and not harder. You know what I'm saying? So let's see how this goes.

[00:02:07] So let's start with the first way that we use this phrase, to put emphasis on negative sentences or to make them stronger. Here's an example, I don't like him at all. I don't like him at all. Okay? So this is a negative phrase. I do not like him at all. And it would be totally fine if you said, "I don't like him". There's nothing wrong with that. However, when you add "at all" to the end of your sentence, you're just putting emphasis on the fact that you really do not like this person. I don't like him at all. It's essentially the same thing as saying, "I don't like him, not even a little bit". I don't like him even a little bit, not in the slightest. Not at all. Okay? So when someone says "not at all", they're essentially saying not even a little bit. Like, 0%. Not 1 or 2, just not at all. All right? I'm sure you get the point.

[00:03:01] So here's another example, they're not giving us any money at all. They're not giving us any money at all. Another negative sentence. They are not giving us any money, not even a little bit. Not a single dollar. No money at all. Okay? Another example, that makes no sense at all. So maybe I'm explaining this to you right now and you're like, "Tony, bro, that shit makes no sense at all". Really what you're saying is that doesn't even make a little bit of sense. It makes zero sense or absolutely no sense, right? It makes no sense whatsoever. That's the point. All right? 

[00:03:38] Another example, you haven't made any effort at all. You haven't made any effort at all, bro. And what you're saying is you haven't made the slightest bit of effort. Not even a little bit. Absolutely no effort. Another example, I'm not at all tired. I'm not at all tired. I'm not at all tired. Now, this is an example of putting the phrase before an adjective and not at the end of the sentence. So you're really just putting emphasis on the fact that you're not even a little bit tired. That's really what you're saying. So you could say, I'm not tired at all. And it would literally be the same thing. So that's something that I don't think you need to pay too much attention to or try to learn how to speak that way. It's just so that you understand most of the time we put "at all" at the end of the sentence. But there are times when we put it right before an adjective to put emphasis on that adjective. Okay? It's a little more advanced, so don't worry too much about it.

[00:04:32] Now, you can also use this as a response, this phrase "at all", you can use it as a response when someone asks you a question. For example, your friend might ask you, "You don't care, do you?". Like, "Man, you don't care, do you?". And you can respond by saying, "No, not at all". Right? No, I don't care, not at all. Not even a little bit. I don't care in the slightest, whatsoever. You see? Now, let's talk about the second way we use this phrase, which is to put emphasis on questions when we're trying to see if something is true or not true. Here's an example, has the situation improved at all? Has the situation improved at all? This question is basically or it's not basically, it's actually the same thing as asking, has the situation improved even slightly or even a little bit, or is it exactly the same as it was the last time I asked you? Has it improved at all? A little bit? To some extent? You see what I'm saying?

[00:05:34] Here's another example, do you love me at all? Do you love me at all? Do you? Do you love me at all? So what you're asking in that question is, do you love me even a little bit? Do you love me to any extent? Right? Do you love me even slightly? That's the idea here. All right? One more example, do you have any money at all? Do you have any money at all? So again, you're asking, do you have even a little bit of money? Are you saying that you don't have one single dollar? You have no money at all? Right? Now, remember when I said there are some cases in which you can say "at all" and nothing more and it would make sense. So here's an example. Let's imagine that your friend is talking about a situation and they tell you "The situation has not improved". And if you're trying to... If you're surprised by that, you can say "At all?". Right? 

[00:06:29] So let me say it again. Hopefully, it'll make sense when I say a little bit faster. Person number one says, "The situation hasn't improved" and you respond by saying "At all?". Like, really? And really what you're asking or that's a shorter form of the complete phrase, which is "not at all". Because you're saying like, "Really? Has not improved even a little bit? Not at all? Not even in the slightest? It's exactly the same?". So that's the case in which you can just say "At all?" and you're asking, like, "Not even a little bit?". You see what I'm saying? Again, if that's confusing to you or it's like, hard to remember, don't worry too much about it. I just want the explanation to be clear. I didn't want to leave anything out because you will hear stuff like this, you know, from time to time at least here in the U.S. All right?

[00:07:12] Now there are some other more advanced ways to use this phrase "at all", and that is in conditional sentences. All right? So let me give you an example. If you loved me at all, you would help me. If you love me at all, you would help me. Now, although that's a very manipulative thing to say to somebody, it makes perfect grammatical sense. And what you're saying is if you loved me even a little bit, then you would help me. Right? Another example, if he had studied at all, he would have passed the exam. If he had studied at all, he would have passed the exam. So again, he's saying if he would have studied just a little bit to any extent, he would have passed the exam. But since he did not study for the exam, he didn't pass. All right? 

[00:07:59] One more example, if you have any problems at all, just call me and I'll take care of it. If you have any problems at all, just call me and I'll take care of it. So what I'm saying is if you have even the slightest problem, if you have any problems whatsoever just call me. So in the first two examples, you're essentially saying, if this thing were true, then this other thing would have happened or would happen in the present or the future. Right? So you're saying, if you loved me, then you would help me. If your love for me was true, then you would do this. The second example, if he had done this then this other thing would have happened. The third example, you're essentially saying, if this thing happens, then this other thing will happen. So if you have any problems at all, then I will help you. I will take care of it. All right? Cool.

[00:08:52] Now, although the third way that we use the phrase "at all" is a little more advanced and a little less common in everyday situations, you will hear it from time to time. So hopefully after hearing the explanation of the phrase and the examples of the other two ways to use this phrase, you can understand the idea. You know? The true meaning of the phrase "at all". Which is essentially, you know, even a little bit or to some extent or in any way or even slightly or whatsoever. Okay? Hopefully, hopefully that makes sense. Hopefully, you understand more now than you did before you started listening to the podcast. But like I always say, man, feel free to send me your questions. If you're watching this on YouTube leave a comment below if the explanation wasn't clear. All right? But that's Coffee with Kaizen number 17 in the books. So I'll talk to you tomorrow. Peace!

[END OF EPISODE]

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[00:00:00] In this episode, I'm going to explain the English phrase "at all". What's up, my friend? This is Coffee with Kaizen number 17. And we're going to be talking about the English phrase "at all". Now, in the last episode number 16, I explained the difference, or I did my best to explain the difference between the words "everything" and "all". Immediately after I posted that episode, I got a lot of questions about the English phrase "at all". So that's what I'm going to explain to you today.

[00:00:33] Now, this phrase really isn't something that you can think about logically because on the surface the words at all really don't make any sense. You know what I'm saying? It's only when you put them in a complete sentence that they have any real meaning. Now, there are exceptions. There are always exceptions in the English language, and do not forget it. All right? There are some exceptions, some cases in which you can simply say the words at all, and it would make sense. But I'll talk about that in a little bit because I don't want to confuse you from the jump or from the beginning, you know, right in the beginning of the transmission. Hopefully, that makes sense. All right?

[00:01:08] So first, we use this phrase "at all" in two main ways. Now, there are more than two ways, there's really three or four. But I'm going to first explain the two main ways, the most common ways that you need to learn. Number one, to put emphasis on negative sentences or, in other words, to make them stronger. That's how we use the phrase at all. Number two, to put emphasis on questions when we're trying to see if something is true or not. Okay? So "at all" really means even a little bit or in any way or even slightly. And usually we put "at all" at the end of a question or sentence. However, there are some cases in which we will use "at all" right before an adjective. Okay? Hopefully, I'm not confusing you. I am going to give you plenty of examples. So I hope, my goal here is that by the end of the transmission, it'll be clear, it'll be easier to understand and not harder. You know what I'm saying? So let's see how this goes.

[00:02:07] So let's start with the first way that we use this phrase, to put emphasis on negative sentences or to make them stronger. Here's an example, I don't like him at all. I don't like him at all. Okay? So this is a negative phrase. I do not like him at all. And it would be totally fine if you said, "I don't like him". There's nothing wrong with that. However, when you add "at all" to the end of your sentence, you're just putting emphasis on the fact that you really do not like this person. I don't like him at all. It's essentially the same thing as saying, "I don't like him, not even a little bit". I don't like him even a little bit, not in the slightest. Not at all. Okay? So when someone says "not at all", they're essentially saying not even a little bit. Like, 0%. Not 1 or 2, just not at all. All right? I'm sure you get the point.

[00:03:01] So here's another example, they're not giving us any money at all. They're not giving us any money at all. Another negative sentence. They are not giving us any money, not even a little bit. Not a single dollar. No money at all. Okay? Another example, that makes no sense at all. So maybe I'm explaining this to you right now and you're like, "Tony, bro, that shit makes no sense at all". Really what you're saying is that doesn't even make a little bit of sense. It makes zero sense or absolutely no sense, right? It makes no sense whatsoever. That's the point. All right? 

[00:03:38] Another example, you haven't made any effort at all. You haven't made any effort at all, bro. And what you're saying is you haven't made the slightest bit of effort. Not even a little bit. Absolutely no effort. Another example, I'm not at all tired. I'm not at all tired. I'm not at all tired. Now, this is an example of putting the phrase before an adjective and not at the end of the sentence. So you're really just putting emphasis on the fact that you're not even a little bit tired. That's really what you're saying. So you could say, I'm not tired at all. And it would literally be the same thing. So that's something that I don't think you need to pay too much attention to or try to learn how to speak that way. It's just so that you understand most of the time we put "at all" at the end of the sentence. But there are times when we put it right before an adjective to put emphasis on that adjective. Okay? It's a little more advanced, so don't worry too much about it.

[00:04:32] Now, you can also use this as a response, this phrase "at all", you can use it as a response when someone asks you a question. For example, your friend might ask you, "You don't care, do you?". Like, "Man, you don't care, do you?". And you can respond by saying, "No, not at all". Right? No, I don't care, not at all. Not even a little bit. I don't care in the slightest, whatsoever. You see? Now, let's talk about the second way we use this phrase, which is to put emphasis on questions when we're trying to see if something is true or not true. Here's an example, has the situation improved at all? Has the situation improved at all? This question is basically or it's not basically, it's actually the same thing as asking, has the situation improved even slightly or even a little bit, or is it exactly the same as it was the last time I asked you? Has it improved at all? A little bit? To some extent? You see what I'm saying?

[00:05:34] Here's another example, do you love me at all? Do you love me at all? Do you? Do you love me at all? So what you're asking in that question is, do you love me even a little bit? Do you love me to any extent? Right? Do you love me even slightly? That's the idea here. All right? One more example, do you have any money at all? Do you have any money at all? So again, you're asking, do you have even a little bit of money? Are you saying that you don't have one single dollar? You have no money at all? Right? Now, remember when I said there are some cases in which you can say "at all" and nothing more and it would make sense. So here's an example. Let's imagine that your friend is talking about a situation and they tell you "The situation has not improved". And if you're trying to... If you're surprised by that, you can say "At all?". Right? 

[00:06:29] So let me say it again. Hopefully, it'll make sense when I say a little bit faster. Person number one says, "The situation hasn't improved" and you respond by saying "At all?". Like, really? And really what you're asking or that's a shorter form of the complete phrase, which is "not at all". Because you're saying like, "Really? Has not improved even a little bit? Not at all? Not even in the slightest? It's exactly the same?". So that's the case in which you can just say "At all?" and you're asking, like, "Not even a little bit?". You see what I'm saying? Again, if that's confusing to you or it's like, hard to remember, don't worry too much about it. I just want the explanation to be clear. I didn't want to leave anything out because you will hear stuff like this, you know, from time to time at least here in the U.S. All right?

[00:07:12] Now there are some other more advanced ways to use this phrase "at all", and that is in conditional sentences. All right? So let me give you an example. If you loved me at all, you would help me. If you love me at all, you would help me. Now, although that's a very manipulative thing to say to somebody, it makes perfect grammatical sense. And what you're saying is if you loved me even a little bit, then you would help me. Right? Another example, if he had studied at all, he would have passed the exam. If he had studied at all, he would have passed the exam. So again, he's saying if he would have studied just a little bit to any extent, he would have passed the exam. But since he did not study for the exam, he didn't pass. All right? 

[00:07:59] One more example, if you have any problems at all, just call me and I'll take care of it. If you have any problems at all, just call me and I'll take care of it. So what I'm saying is if you have even the slightest problem, if you have any problems whatsoever just call me. So in the first two examples, you're essentially saying, if this thing were true, then this other thing would have happened or would happen in the present or the future. Right? So you're saying, if you loved me, then you would help me. If your love for me was true, then you would do this. The second example, if he had done this then this other thing would have happened. The third example, you're essentially saying, if this thing happens, then this other thing will happen. So if you have any problems at all, then I will help you. I will take care of it. All right? Cool.

[00:08:52] Now, although the third way that we use the phrase "at all" is a little more advanced and a little less common in everyday situations, you will hear it from time to time. So hopefully after hearing the explanation of the phrase and the examples of the other two ways to use this phrase, you can understand the idea. You know? The true meaning of the phrase "at all". Which is essentially, you know, even a little bit or to some extent or in any way or even slightly or whatsoever. Okay? Hopefully, hopefully that makes sense. Hopefully, you understand more now than you did before you started listening to the podcast. But like I always say, man, feel free to send me your questions. If you're watching this on YouTube leave a comment below if the explanation wasn't clear. All right? But that's Coffee with Kaizen number 17 in the books. So I'll talk to you tomorrow. Peace!

[END OF EPISODE]

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