CK #18 - Today Morning? This Night?

September 7, 2021

In this episode, I’m gonna help you correct a grammar mistake that many students make when talking about the time of day.

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[00:00:00] Yo, man. We don't say "today morning" or "on the afternoon" or "today at night". So let me help you sound more natural.

[00:00:13] What's up, my friend? This is Coffee with Kaizen number 18. And in this episode, I'm going to help you correct a little grammar mistake that many learners of English make when they're talking about the time of the day. Now, I've heard many of my students say things like "today morning" or "on the afternoon" or "today at night" when they're referring to the time of day that something happens. For example, today morning I went to the gym for an hour. Or today at night, I will go to the movies with my friends. Or I will see you this night. All of these sentences are grammatically incorrect, and to be honest, they sound a little strange. I would understand what you were trying to say, but I'm going to teach you how to express yourself more naturally. All right

[00:01:00] So first, let's just talk about the times of the day to make sure we're on the same page. The first one, dawn. D A W N, dawn. This just refers to that period of the day that's right before sunrise. Right before the sun starts to rise over the horizon, or at the moment the sun starts to rise over the horizon. That's what we refer to as dawn. It's not a specific time or anything like that. It's just that short little window of time when the sun is rising in the morning. All right?

[00:01:30] So after that, we have the morning, which is, you know, debatable. But let's say 5 am until 11:59 am. Let's just say that for an example. After that you have noon. N O O N. And that just refers to 12 pm. That specific point in time. Next, you have the afternoon, which is 12:01 pm to, let's say, seven p.m. Also debatable. Some people say 6:00 pm. Some people say 8:00 pm. But it's not the point. It's not important. So next we have the evening, which is more or less 7 pm to about 9 pm. Okay? In between the afternoon and the night is what we refer to as the evening. E V E N I N G, evening. All right?

[00:02:13] And after that, we have the night. N I G H T. And that's basically 9 pm until about 11:59 pm. Then we have midnight, which is 12 am. That specific point in time. Then after 12 am, you know, it can be referred to as the middle of the night or the morning. It just depends on the context and the person that's speaking. All right? But either way, I'm going to teach you how to talk about all of it. All right?

[00:02:39] So let me help you express yourself more naturally when referring to these times of the day, starting with 'dawn'. Whenever we refer to this time of day, we say "at dawn", every time. All right? We don't say "this dawn". We don't say "today dawn" or "tomorrow dawn". It's always "at dawn". For example, I've got to get up at dawn to take my dad to the airport. I've got to get up at dawn to take my dad to the airport. Which means the first thing in the morning or the crack of dawn, some people might say, which is that moment right when the sun is coming over the horizon and maybe not literally, they're just saying the first thing in the morning. Really, really, really early, Okay? Another example, she wakes up every morning at dawn to go for a run. First thing in the morning, every day she goes for a run at dawn.

[00:03:31] Now, next let's talk about the morning. Whenever we refer to this time of day, we have two options, depending on the context. So the first option "in the morning", not "on the morning", not "at the morning". At least not in the United States, maybe in another English-speaking country they might say "at the morning". But in the U.S, we say in the morning. Okay? And this just refers to the period of the day that is the morning. The entire period. For example, it never rains in the morning. It never rains in the morning. Another example, I'll see you in the morning. I'll see you in the morning. So again, we're talking about the entire period of the day. It's a very general way to refer to that time of the day. It's not specific. We're just saying it could be 7 am. It could be 9 am, 11 am. All of that is included in the period of the day we refer to as the morning. Okay?

[00:04:24] Now the second option is "this morning". Now, this morning refers to today's morning. So if you say this morning, you're talking about today in the morning, Okay? It's basically the same thing. We just don't say it that way. We say this morning. So if I say, I'll see you this morning. I mean, I will see you today in the morning. Okay? Or I could say, it rained this morning. I'm not talking about yesterday, I'm not talking about in general, talking about today in the period of the morning. Okay? Cool. So next, let's talk about the day, or excuse me, the time of day that we refer to as noon. Now, whenever we refer to this time of day, we say "at noon". Okay? So in the morning, but at noon. All right? For example, the game starts at noon or she called me at noon. And both of these sentences, I'm referring specifically to 12 o'clock pm. Not before, not after. All right?

[00:05:20] Now next, let's talk about the afternoon, the afternoon. Now, when we refer to this time of day, we also have two options, depending on the context. The first one, "in the afternoon". So just like we say "in the morning", we also say in the afternoon. This refers to that period of the day that is the afternoon. All right? So for example, I prefer to study in the afternoon after I finish working. Okay? Another example, I don't usually go shopping in the afternoon. So both of these examples, whenever we say in the afternoon, we're saying in general talking about that general time of day, that period of the day. I generally like to study in the period of the day that is the afternoon. In the afternoon, right? Or I generally don't go shopping in the period of the day that is the afternoon. Second option, "this afternoon".

[00:06:11] So just like this morning, we're talking about today in the afternoon. For example, I studied this afternoon after I finished working. So I worked all morning and then after I finished, I studied today in the afternoon. All right? One more example, I went shopping this afternoon. I went shopping this afternoon. Today that happened, not yesterday. It's not going to happen tomorrow. I went shopping today, this afternoon. All right? Cool.

[00:06:40] Next, let's talk about the evening. E V E N I N G. Spelled it right that time. Right? The evening. Again, when we refer to this time of day, we have two options, depending on the context. The first one, in the evening. So let me summarize again. In the after... No, excuse me, in the morning, at noon, in the afternoon and in the evening. All right? So just like all the others, this refers to the period of the day that we refer to as the evening. Right? That little window of time. So an example, I like to go for a walk in the evening. So in general, maybe every day, usually at this time of day, I like to go for a walk.

[00:07:23] Another example, most people watch TV in the evening. Right? They work all day. They come home, have dinner, and in the evening they like to relax and watch TV. All right? Not at the evening. Not all in the evening. Not around the evening. In the evening. All right? So the second option, this evening. Just like this morning, just like this afternoon. This evening. And we're talking about today specifically. Okay? So "in the", you can think of it that way, in the morning, afternoon, evening. Saying in general, right? This period of time. It could be 7 o'clock, 10 o'clock, 5 o'clock, whatever. It's just in general. We say "this" talking specifically about today. So, this evening. We went for a walk this evening. Today that happened. Or let's watch TV this evening. Right? I want this evening today, in the evening, let's watch TV. I'm sure you get the point. I feel like I'm over-explaining. I'm sure you get the point by now. So I'm just going to keep going. All right? We're almost done.

[00:08:21] Next, let's talk about the night. Okay? Whenever we refer to this time of day, we have a few options depending on the context, as always. But it's not in the night. Okay? Because we have in the morning, in the afternoon, in the evening. But we say "at night", we don't say "in the night". Now there are some specific cases there's an exception to that rule. Like with everything in English, you will sometimes hear somebody say "in the night". But that's... It's not common and they're very specific situations. So I don't want to confuse you in this episode, so I won't explain that right now. I'm trying to just get you the basics, the general, most common, natural way that we use or that we refer to this time of day. All right?

[00:09:03] So back to the explanation, we say in the morning, in the afternoon, in the evening, but at night. Okay? This refers to that period of time that we refer to as the night, the time of day that we refer to as night. So here's an example. I do my best work at night. Not on night. Not in the night. At night. Okay? Another example, my city is dangerous at night. Okay? So maybe not all day, or maybe not all the time it's dangerous. But this specific period of time from, let's say, whenever the sun goes down, 9 pm until midnight or whatever. During that time at night, it's dangerous. Okay? Now the second option you have is "tonight". One word. T O N I G H T, tonight. That's the same thing as saying this night, although... And although you can say that in certain cases, when you're referring to specifically this night, we would say 'tonight'. Okay? Like I said, I don't want to confuse you, just teaching you the basics, the general way to refer to that specific point in time. All right?

[00:10:11] So let me just give you some examples. We're going out tonight. I wouldn't say we're going out today at night. I wouldn't say we're going out on night or anything like that. If you're referring to today specifically, during the period of the day that we refer to as night, you would say "we're going out tonight". Which is the same thing as saying, we're going out this night, today specifically. Right? Here's another example. I'll see you tonight. I'll see you tonight. Right? I could say I'll see you today, but that indicates that I'll see you during the daytime, but we're not talking about the day, we're talking about the night. So I'll see you tonight. Not this night. I mean, again, you could say that. I'll see you this night. But it just sounds weird. It makes sense, but it sounds weird. We don't speak that way. You know what I'm saying? So I'll see you tonight, or we're going out to a party tonight or we're going to a bar tonight. Which means today, not yesterday, not tomorrow, but tonight.

[00:11:08] Now I know grammar lessons aren't the most interesting thing to listen to on a podcast. And maybe you think this is really basic stuff, but there are people out there that still make this mistake every single day. So send this to a friend that you think might find it useful so that you can teach them or just remind them that we don't say today morning, on the afternoon, or today at night. We say this morning, in the afternoon, and tonight.

[00:11:33] Now I need to add this last explanation to the end because I definitely forgot about it when I was preparing for this episode. I forgot to mention how to talk about the past and the future when referring to times of the day. All right? So let me teach you that really quickly, because it's very simple. So we already know that in most cases, if we're talking about today we would say this morning, this afternoon, this evening or tonight. Right?

[00:11:57] So now let's talk about the past. If we're talking about the morning you would say "yesterday morning". The morning of yesterday. Right? Yesterday morning. Or the present, this morning. And now the future, tomorrow. We would say "tomorrow morning". Okay? Yesterday morning. This morning. Tomorrow morning. Past, present, future. Same thing for the afternoon. Yesterday afternoon, past. This afternoon, today. Tomorrow afternoon. Tomorrow, the future. And next is the evening. Right? Yesterday evening. This evening. Tomorrow evening. Same thing.

[00:12:34] Now when we're talking about the night, we do not say "yesterday night". Sounds really strange. We would say "last night", which means yesterday at night. That's really what it means. We don't say yesterday night. Okay? Last night. So last night, yesterday at night. That's what we mean. Tonight means today at night. Now, tomorrow we would say "tomorrow night". So one more time. Last night, yesterday. Tonight means today at night. Tomorrow, tomorrow night. Okay? Past, present, future. So that's Coffee with Kaizen number 18 in the books. And I'll talk to you tomorrow. Peace!

[END OF EPISODE]

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[00:00:00] Yo, man. We don't say "today morning" or "on the afternoon" or "today at night". So let me help you sound more natural.

[00:00:13] What's up, my friend? This is Coffee with Kaizen number 18. And in this episode, I'm going to help you correct a little grammar mistake that many learners of English make when they're talking about the time of the day. Now, I've heard many of my students say things like "today morning" or "on the afternoon" or "today at night" when they're referring to the time of day that something happens. For example, today morning I went to the gym for an hour. Or today at night, I will go to the movies with my friends. Or I will see you this night. All of these sentences are grammatically incorrect, and to be honest, they sound a little strange. I would understand what you were trying to say, but I'm going to teach you how to express yourself more naturally. All right

[00:01:00] So first, let's just talk about the times of the day to make sure we're on the same page. The first one, dawn. D A W N, dawn. This just refers to that period of the day that's right before sunrise. Right before the sun starts to rise over the horizon, or at the moment the sun starts to rise over the horizon. That's what we refer to as dawn. It's not a specific time or anything like that. It's just that short little window of time when the sun is rising in the morning. All right?

[00:01:30] So after that, we have the morning, which is, you know, debatable. But let's say 5 am until 11:59 am. Let's just say that for an example. After that you have noon. N O O N. And that just refers to 12 pm. That specific point in time. Next, you have the afternoon, which is 12:01 pm to, let's say, seven p.m. Also debatable. Some people say 6:00 pm. Some people say 8:00 pm. But it's not the point. It's not important. So next we have the evening, which is more or less 7 pm to about 9 pm. Okay? In between the afternoon and the night is what we refer to as the evening. E V E N I N G, evening. All right?

[00:02:13] And after that, we have the night. N I G H T. And that's basically 9 pm until about 11:59 pm. Then we have midnight, which is 12 am. That specific point in time. Then after 12 am, you know, it can be referred to as the middle of the night or the morning. It just depends on the context and the person that's speaking. All right? But either way, I'm going to teach you how to talk about all of it. All right?

[00:02:39] So let me help you express yourself more naturally when referring to these times of the day, starting with 'dawn'. Whenever we refer to this time of day, we say "at dawn", every time. All right? We don't say "this dawn". We don't say "today dawn" or "tomorrow dawn". It's always "at dawn". For example, I've got to get up at dawn to take my dad to the airport. I've got to get up at dawn to take my dad to the airport. Which means the first thing in the morning or the crack of dawn, some people might say, which is that moment right when the sun is coming over the horizon and maybe not literally, they're just saying the first thing in the morning. Really, really, really early, Okay? Another example, she wakes up every morning at dawn to go for a run. First thing in the morning, every day she goes for a run at dawn.

[00:03:31] Now, next let's talk about the morning. Whenever we refer to this time of day, we have two options, depending on the context. So the first option "in the morning", not "on the morning", not "at the morning". At least not in the United States, maybe in another English-speaking country they might say "at the morning". But in the U.S, we say in the morning. Okay? And this just refers to the period of the day that is the morning. The entire period. For example, it never rains in the morning. It never rains in the morning. Another example, I'll see you in the morning. I'll see you in the morning. So again, we're talking about the entire period of the day. It's a very general way to refer to that time of the day. It's not specific. We're just saying it could be 7 am. It could be 9 am, 11 am. All of that is included in the period of the day we refer to as the morning. Okay?

[00:04:24] Now the second option is "this morning". Now, this morning refers to today's morning. So if you say this morning, you're talking about today in the morning, Okay? It's basically the same thing. We just don't say it that way. We say this morning. So if I say, I'll see you this morning. I mean, I will see you today in the morning. Okay? Or I could say, it rained this morning. I'm not talking about yesterday, I'm not talking about in general, talking about today in the period of the morning. Okay? Cool. So next, let's talk about the day, or excuse me, the time of day that we refer to as noon. Now, whenever we refer to this time of day, we say "at noon". Okay? So in the morning, but at noon. All right? For example, the game starts at noon or she called me at noon. And both of these sentences, I'm referring specifically to 12 o'clock pm. Not before, not after. All right?

[00:05:20] Now next, let's talk about the afternoon, the afternoon. Now, when we refer to this time of day, we also have two options, depending on the context. The first one, "in the afternoon". So just like we say "in the morning", we also say in the afternoon. This refers to that period of the day that is the afternoon. All right? So for example, I prefer to study in the afternoon after I finish working. Okay? Another example, I don't usually go shopping in the afternoon. So both of these examples, whenever we say in the afternoon, we're saying in general talking about that general time of day, that period of the day. I generally like to study in the period of the day that is the afternoon. In the afternoon, right? Or I generally don't go shopping in the period of the day that is the afternoon. Second option, "this afternoon".

[00:06:11] So just like this morning, we're talking about today in the afternoon. For example, I studied this afternoon after I finished working. So I worked all morning and then after I finished, I studied today in the afternoon. All right? One more example, I went shopping this afternoon. I went shopping this afternoon. Today that happened, not yesterday. It's not going to happen tomorrow. I went shopping today, this afternoon. All right? Cool.

[00:06:40] Next, let's talk about the evening. E V E N I N G. Spelled it right that time. Right? The evening. Again, when we refer to this time of day, we have two options, depending on the context. The first one, in the evening. So let me summarize again. In the after... No, excuse me, in the morning, at noon, in the afternoon and in the evening. All right? So just like all the others, this refers to the period of the day that we refer to as the evening. Right? That little window of time. So an example, I like to go for a walk in the evening. So in general, maybe every day, usually at this time of day, I like to go for a walk.

[00:07:23] Another example, most people watch TV in the evening. Right? They work all day. They come home, have dinner, and in the evening they like to relax and watch TV. All right? Not at the evening. Not all in the evening. Not around the evening. In the evening. All right? So the second option, this evening. Just like this morning, just like this afternoon. This evening. And we're talking about today specifically. Okay? So "in the", you can think of it that way, in the morning, afternoon, evening. Saying in general, right? This period of time. It could be 7 o'clock, 10 o'clock, 5 o'clock, whatever. It's just in general. We say "this" talking specifically about today. So, this evening. We went for a walk this evening. Today that happened. Or let's watch TV this evening. Right? I want this evening today, in the evening, let's watch TV. I'm sure you get the point. I feel like I'm over-explaining. I'm sure you get the point by now. So I'm just going to keep going. All right? We're almost done.

[00:08:21] Next, let's talk about the night. Okay? Whenever we refer to this time of day, we have a few options depending on the context, as always. But it's not in the night. Okay? Because we have in the morning, in the afternoon, in the evening. But we say "at night", we don't say "in the night". Now there are some specific cases there's an exception to that rule. Like with everything in English, you will sometimes hear somebody say "in the night". But that's... It's not common and they're very specific situations. So I don't want to confuse you in this episode, so I won't explain that right now. I'm trying to just get you the basics, the general, most common, natural way that we use or that we refer to this time of day. All right?

[00:09:03] So back to the explanation, we say in the morning, in the afternoon, in the evening, but at night. Okay? This refers to that period of time that we refer to as the night, the time of day that we refer to as night. So here's an example. I do my best work at night. Not on night. Not in the night. At night. Okay? Another example, my city is dangerous at night. Okay? So maybe not all day, or maybe not all the time it's dangerous. But this specific period of time from, let's say, whenever the sun goes down, 9 pm until midnight or whatever. During that time at night, it's dangerous. Okay? Now the second option you have is "tonight". One word. T O N I G H T, tonight. That's the same thing as saying this night, although... And although you can say that in certain cases, when you're referring to specifically this night, we would say 'tonight'. Okay? Like I said, I don't want to confuse you, just teaching you the basics, the general way to refer to that specific point in time. All right?

[00:10:11] So let me just give you some examples. We're going out tonight. I wouldn't say we're going out today at night. I wouldn't say we're going out on night or anything like that. If you're referring to today specifically, during the period of the day that we refer to as night, you would say "we're going out tonight". Which is the same thing as saying, we're going out this night, today specifically. Right? Here's another example. I'll see you tonight. I'll see you tonight. Right? I could say I'll see you today, but that indicates that I'll see you during the daytime, but we're not talking about the day, we're talking about the night. So I'll see you tonight. Not this night. I mean, again, you could say that. I'll see you this night. But it just sounds weird. It makes sense, but it sounds weird. We don't speak that way. You know what I'm saying? So I'll see you tonight, or we're going out to a party tonight or we're going to a bar tonight. Which means today, not yesterday, not tomorrow, but tonight.

[00:11:08] Now I know grammar lessons aren't the most interesting thing to listen to on a podcast. And maybe you think this is really basic stuff, but there are people out there that still make this mistake every single day. So send this to a friend that you think might find it useful so that you can teach them or just remind them that we don't say today morning, on the afternoon, or today at night. We say this morning, in the afternoon, and tonight.

[00:11:33] Now I need to add this last explanation to the end because I definitely forgot about it when I was preparing for this episode. I forgot to mention how to talk about the past and the future when referring to times of the day. All right? So let me teach you that really quickly, because it's very simple. So we already know that in most cases, if we're talking about today we would say this morning, this afternoon, this evening or tonight. Right?

[00:11:57] So now let's talk about the past. If we're talking about the morning you would say "yesterday morning". The morning of yesterday. Right? Yesterday morning. Or the present, this morning. And now the future, tomorrow. We would say "tomorrow morning". Okay? Yesterday morning. This morning. Tomorrow morning. Past, present, future. Same thing for the afternoon. Yesterday afternoon, past. This afternoon, today. Tomorrow afternoon. Tomorrow, the future. And next is the evening. Right? Yesterday evening. This evening. Tomorrow evening. Same thing.

[00:12:34] Now when we're talking about the night, we do not say "yesterday night". Sounds really strange. We would say "last night", which means yesterday at night. That's really what it means. We don't say yesterday night. Okay? Last night. So last night, yesterday at night. That's what we mean. Tonight means today at night. Now, tomorrow we would say "tomorrow night". So one more time. Last night, yesterday. Tonight means today at night. Tomorrow, tomorrow night. Okay? Past, present, future. So that's Coffee with Kaizen number 18 in the books. And I'll talk to you tomorrow. Peace!

[END OF EPISODE]

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Transcript

[00:00:00] Yo, man. We don't say "today morning" or "on the afternoon" or "today at night". So let me help you sound more natural.

[00:00:13] What's up, my friend? This is Coffee with Kaizen number 18. And in this episode, I'm going to help you correct a little grammar mistake that many learners of English make when they're talking about the time of the day. Now, I've heard many of my students say things like "today morning" or "on the afternoon" or "today at night" when they're referring to the time of day that something happens. For example, today morning I went to the gym for an hour. Or today at night, I will go to the movies with my friends. Or I will see you this night. All of these sentences are grammatically incorrect, and to be honest, they sound a little strange. I would understand what you were trying to say, but I'm going to teach you how to express yourself more naturally. All right

[00:01:00] So first, let's just talk about the times of the day to make sure we're on the same page. The first one, dawn. D A W N, dawn. This just refers to that period of the day that's right before sunrise. Right before the sun starts to rise over the horizon, or at the moment the sun starts to rise over the horizon. That's what we refer to as dawn. It's not a specific time or anything like that. It's just that short little window of time when the sun is rising in the morning. All right?

[00:01:30] So after that, we have the morning, which is, you know, debatable. But let's say 5 am until 11:59 am. Let's just say that for an example. After that you have noon. N O O N. And that just refers to 12 pm. That specific point in time. Next, you have the afternoon, which is 12:01 pm to, let's say, seven p.m. Also debatable. Some people say 6:00 pm. Some people say 8:00 pm. But it's not the point. It's not important. So next we have the evening, which is more or less 7 pm to about 9 pm. Okay? In between the afternoon and the night is what we refer to as the evening. E V E N I N G, evening. All right?

[00:02:13] And after that, we have the night. N I G H T. And that's basically 9 pm until about 11:59 pm. Then we have midnight, which is 12 am. That specific point in time. Then after 12 am, you know, it can be referred to as the middle of the night or the morning. It just depends on the context and the person that's speaking. All right? But either way, I'm going to teach you how to talk about all of it. All right?

[00:02:39] So let me help you express yourself more naturally when referring to these times of the day, starting with 'dawn'. Whenever we refer to this time of day, we say "at dawn", every time. All right? We don't say "this dawn". We don't say "today dawn" or "tomorrow dawn". It's always "at dawn". For example, I've got to get up at dawn to take my dad to the airport. I've got to get up at dawn to take my dad to the airport. Which means the first thing in the morning or the crack of dawn, some people might say, which is that moment right when the sun is coming over the horizon and maybe not literally, they're just saying the first thing in the morning. Really, really, really early, Okay? Another example, she wakes up every morning at dawn to go for a run. First thing in the morning, every day she goes for a run at dawn.

[00:03:31] Now, next let's talk about the morning. Whenever we refer to this time of day, we have two options, depending on the context. So the first option "in the morning", not "on the morning", not "at the morning". At least not in the United States, maybe in another English-speaking country they might say "at the morning". But in the U.S, we say in the morning. Okay? And this just refers to the period of the day that is the morning. The entire period. For example, it never rains in the morning. It never rains in the morning. Another example, I'll see you in the morning. I'll see you in the morning. So again, we're talking about the entire period of the day. It's a very general way to refer to that time of the day. It's not specific. We're just saying it could be 7 am. It could be 9 am, 11 am. All of that is included in the period of the day we refer to as the morning. Okay?

[00:04:24] Now the second option is "this morning". Now, this morning refers to today's morning. So if you say this morning, you're talking about today in the morning, Okay? It's basically the same thing. We just don't say it that way. We say this morning. So if I say, I'll see you this morning. I mean, I will see you today in the morning. Okay? Or I could say, it rained this morning. I'm not talking about yesterday, I'm not talking about in general, talking about today in the period of the morning. Okay? Cool. So next, let's talk about the day, or excuse me, the time of day that we refer to as noon. Now, whenever we refer to this time of day, we say "at noon". Okay? So in the morning, but at noon. All right? For example, the game starts at noon or she called me at noon. And both of these sentences, I'm referring specifically to 12 o'clock pm. Not before, not after. All right?

[00:05:20] Now next, let's talk about the afternoon, the afternoon. Now, when we refer to this time of day, we also have two options, depending on the context. The first one, "in the afternoon". So just like we say "in the morning", we also say in the afternoon. This refers to that period of the day that is the afternoon. All right? So for example, I prefer to study in the afternoon after I finish working. Okay? Another example, I don't usually go shopping in the afternoon. So both of these examples, whenever we say in the afternoon, we're saying in general talking about that general time of day, that period of the day. I generally like to study in the period of the day that is the afternoon. In the afternoon, right? Or I generally don't go shopping in the period of the day that is the afternoon. Second option, "this afternoon".

[00:06:11] So just like this morning, we're talking about today in the afternoon. For example, I studied this afternoon after I finished working. So I worked all morning and then after I finished, I studied today in the afternoon. All right? One more example, I went shopping this afternoon. I went shopping this afternoon. Today that happened, not yesterday. It's not going to happen tomorrow. I went shopping today, this afternoon. All right? Cool.

[00:06:40] Next, let's talk about the evening. E V E N I N G. Spelled it right that time. Right? The evening. Again, when we refer to this time of day, we have two options, depending on the context. The first one, in the evening. So let me summarize again. In the after... No, excuse me, in the morning, at noon, in the afternoon and in the evening. All right? So just like all the others, this refers to the period of the day that we refer to as the evening. Right? That little window of time. So an example, I like to go for a walk in the evening. So in general, maybe every day, usually at this time of day, I like to go for a walk.

[00:07:23] Another example, most people watch TV in the evening. Right? They work all day. They come home, have dinner, and in the evening they like to relax and watch TV. All right? Not at the evening. Not all in the evening. Not around the evening. In the evening. All right? So the second option, this evening. Just like this morning, just like this afternoon. This evening. And we're talking about today specifically. Okay? So "in the", you can think of it that way, in the morning, afternoon, evening. Saying in general, right? This period of time. It could be 7 o'clock, 10 o'clock, 5 o'clock, whatever. It's just in general. We say "this" talking specifically about today. So, this evening. We went for a walk this evening. Today that happened. Or let's watch TV this evening. Right? I want this evening today, in the evening, let's watch TV. I'm sure you get the point. I feel like I'm over-explaining. I'm sure you get the point by now. So I'm just going to keep going. All right? We're almost done.

[00:08:21] Next, let's talk about the night. Okay? Whenever we refer to this time of day, we have a few options depending on the context, as always. But it's not in the night. Okay? Because we have in the morning, in the afternoon, in the evening. But we say "at night", we don't say "in the night". Now there are some specific cases there's an exception to that rule. Like with everything in English, you will sometimes hear somebody say "in the night". But that's... It's not common and they're very specific situations. So I don't want to confuse you in this episode, so I won't explain that right now. I'm trying to just get you the basics, the general, most common, natural way that we use or that we refer to this time of day. All right?

[00:09:03] So back to the explanation, we say in the morning, in the afternoon, in the evening, but at night. Okay? This refers to that period of time that we refer to as the night, the time of day that we refer to as night. So here's an example. I do my best work at night. Not on night. Not in the night. At night. Okay? Another example, my city is dangerous at night. Okay? So maybe not all day, or maybe not all the time it's dangerous. But this specific period of time from, let's say, whenever the sun goes down, 9 pm until midnight or whatever. During that time at night, it's dangerous. Okay? Now the second option you have is "tonight". One word. T O N I G H T, tonight. That's the same thing as saying this night, although... And although you can say that in certain cases, when you're referring to specifically this night, we would say 'tonight'. Okay? Like I said, I don't want to confuse you, just teaching you the basics, the general way to refer to that specific point in time. All right?

[00:10:11] So let me just give you some examples. We're going out tonight. I wouldn't say we're going out today at night. I wouldn't say we're going out on night or anything like that. If you're referring to today specifically, during the period of the day that we refer to as night, you would say "we're going out tonight". Which is the same thing as saying, we're going out this night, today specifically. Right? Here's another example. I'll see you tonight. I'll see you tonight. Right? I could say I'll see you today, but that indicates that I'll see you during the daytime, but we're not talking about the day, we're talking about the night. So I'll see you tonight. Not this night. I mean, again, you could say that. I'll see you this night. But it just sounds weird. It makes sense, but it sounds weird. We don't speak that way. You know what I'm saying? So I'll see you tonight, or we're going out to a party tonight or we're going to a bar tonight. Which means today, not yesterday, not tomorrow, but tonight.

[00:11:08] Now I know grammar lessons aren't the most interesting thing to listen to on a podcast. And maybe you think this is really basic stuff, but there are people out there that still make this mistake every single day. So send this to a friend that you think might find it useful so that you can teach them or just remind them that we don't say today morning, on the afternoon, or today at night. We say this morning, in the afternoon, and tonight.

[00:11:33] Now I need to add this last explanation to the end because I definitely forgot about it when I was preparing for this episode. I forgot to mention how to talk about the past and the future when referring to times of the day. All right? So let me teach you that really quickly, because it's very simple. So we already know that in most cases, if we're talking about today we would say this morning, this afternoon, this evening or tonight. Right?

[00:11:57] So now let's talk about the past. If we're talking about the morning you would say "yesterday morning". The morning of yesterday. Right? Yesterday morning. Or the present, this morning. And now the future, tomorrow. We would say "tomorrow morning". Okay? Yesterday morning. This morning. Tomorrow morning. Past, present, future. Same thing for the afternoon. Yesterday afternoon, past. This afternoon, today. Tomorrow afternoon. Tomorrow, the future. And next is the evening. Right? Yesterday evening. This evening. Tomorrow evening. Same thing.

[00:12:34] Now when we're talking about the night, we do not say "yesterday night". Sounds really strange. We would say "last night", which means yesterday at night. That's really what it means. We don't say yesterday night. Okay? Last night. So last night, yesterday at night. That's what we mean. Tonight means today at night. Now, tomorrow we would say "tomorrow night". So one more time. Last night, yesterday. Tonight means today at night. Tomorrow, tomorrow night. Okay? Past, present, future. So that's Coffee with Kaizen number 18 in the books. And I'll talk to you tomorrow. Peace!

[END OF EPISODE]

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