CK #26 - Talking About Nothing 3 - HIGHLIGHTS

December 7, 2021

The best moments from Life in English #119 - Talking About Nothing 3

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[00:00:00] "How do I know if my English is good?"


[00:00:04] I don't think I've ever been asked that question before. How do I know if my English is good?


[00:00:13] That's a good question. Give me a second, I'm gonna think about that because that's a good question.


[00:00:22] I think there's a few ways you can know if your English is actually good. In no particular order, here they are.


[00:00:30] The first one is if you just find yourself randomly thinking in English just because... I think that's the point where, you know, like, I'm.. My brain is really starting to accept the fact that I speak more than one language, or that this new language is important and therefore it needs to be remembered. You see what I'm saying? When you just randomly find yourself having thoughts in English or saying things in English, or even when somebody in your native language is talking to you in your native language and you just naturally want to respond with an expression or a word in English because it just feels better. That's how I think you know your your your level is increasing or improving.


[00:01:08] The other one is when you don't find yourself making an effort to understand spoken English. That's how you know, like, you're really starting to understand the language, because in the beginning, as a beginner, even an intermediate speaker sometimes, you have to focus on what's being said to understand what's being said. Like, you can't be on the computer typing or reading a blog article and then understand the TV in the foreign language because it's just not as normal for your brain, as your native language. But if your native language is on the TV, you can be reading a book and the words, the audio from the TV are entering your brain and you can still understand every single word that's being said without trying. It's your native language. So when you can do that in the foreign language, that's how you know, "OK, I've reached a pretty high level." Because the sound is just entering my brain and being interpreted and understood without me having to focus on it. It's just background noise, but I still understand every word. When that started happening, for me, that's how I knew I really understand this language, you know? So I think that's a good sign.


[00:02:15] Also, I think when. You don't necessarily feel a difference between the way that you... How can I say that accurately? You know how when you're learning the foreign language, especially in the beginning, you feel like a different person when you're speaking the foreign language because it's a completely different way of expressing yourself. Like, the intonation, the word choice, the grammar, everything is just fucking different. So you don't even have, like, the mental capacity to focus on being yourself and expressing yourself. I don't know if that makes sense. But there comes a point where you reach a good enough level to where you don't have to think about the actual words that you're choosing or the way you're expressing yourself or how it sounds when it comes out of your mouth, you're just talking because you're so comfortable with the language. So when you get to that point, you can just be yourself, you know? 


[00:03:12] Which is interesting to think about, too, because there's an idea that we have different personalities when we speak different languages. And people have told me before, like, "You sound different, you act different when you speak Portuguese or Spanish or English. Your voice changes." and stuff like that. And I never really thought about it. But there might be some truth to that. Let me know if you're watching this live on TikTok, let me know in the comments. Do you feel different? Do you feel like your personality or your voice changes when you speak a foreign language? Because I think when you get to that point where maybe you act different or your mannerisms or your voice changes when you're speaking that foreign language, but you feel like you can be yourself 100 percent because you don't have to think about the language. I think that's when, you know, "I've gotten to a good level where I'm not even thinking about the words I'm saying, I'm just saying them."


[00:04:01] Because that's what you do with your native language, right? Like, you might think before you speak in your native language, but you're thinking about what you want to say or how you want to say it and not the actual individual words, like, "Where does 'the' go in the sentence? Where does the adverb go? Does the grammar.. or does the verb go at the beginning or the end of the sentence in this language?" You're not thinking about shit like that. So I think when you get to that point, it's like, "OK, I'm doing pretty good."


[00:04:32] I think also when you consistently have positive interactions with other people. And I don't mean, like, people just like you or, like, you're a more likable person. But I mean, when you're trying to communicate with somebody, you have an objective to either receive or transmit a message. And when you can consistently receive and transmit messages with multiple people, Without having any, like, major problems, then, you know, "I'm doing good." Because a lot of times in the beginning, like, there's a whole bunch of misunderstandings or you get lost all the time, there's a bunch of words you don't understand that this person is saying or you can't express basic ideas, or you can't talk about a bunch of different subjects, right? And for that reason, you don't have consistently positive experiences trying to express yourself in this language. But when time, after time, after time, it's positive, like, "I said what I wanted to say, I could express myself. I understood, you know, 75, 80, 90 percent of what they said." Doing pretty good.


[00:05:36] Other people say, like, once you start dreaming in the language, then, you know, like, "I've reached this really high level." But I've never had a dream in Spanish or Portuguese. I actually don't have dreams. It's not.. That's not a fair thing to say because I actually don't really have dreams like that. That might sound like a weird thing to say. But I have probably, like, six or seven dreams every year. Like, I'm one of those people that goes to sleep and it's just darkness. From the time I go to sleep to the time I wake up, there's no dream. Like, since I was a kid, like, a really young age. I don't even remember as a kid having a bunch of dreams. I know I had them, but I would say since like 12 or 13 years old, nothing. For sure since, like, 14 or 15. No dreams. I go to sleep and it's just darkness. Nothing. So I don't even have dreams in English, getting back to the point, I don't even have dreams in English. So I'm probably not the best person to say whether or not dreams in a foreign language is an indicator that you've reached a high level because I've reached a high level in Spanish and Portuguese, but I don't dream in those languages.


[00:06:47] The only time I know for sure I'm going to have a dream is if I get drunk before I go to sleep. I don't know why, but I know, like, I've noticed if I drink a lot of alcohol before I go to sleep, I'm gonna have a dream that night and it's going to be some wild, fucking crazy dream. Just... like, all dreams can be random and wild and crazy, but when I drink before I go to sleep, they're just the weirdest, most random dreams. But that's the only time. Every other night, for years now, just darkness.


[00:07:23] "Yes, I also feel like I'm acting when I speak in English."


[00:07:28] Actually, that's a really interesting comment. What's your name? Dominic? Dominic, that's what we're going to call you. That's the first half of your screen name. So, Dominic, that's an interesting comment. You feel like you're acting when you're speaking English. I think.. This is something I've thought about for a long time, but never really formulated my actual idea. But I think some particular people that will have a lot of success learning foreign languages are people that know how to act. And what I mean when I say that is learning a language isn't just about learning new words. That's, like, half the battle. That might not even be half the battle. Because obviously, it's important, but language is so much more than just words and letters. Hopefully, we can agree on that. It's, like, energy. It's emotion being communicated. There's physical gestures that we do based on the language that we speak and the country we grew up in. That's also language, like, it's just one part of communication. 


[00:08:29] But anyway, people that know how to act, I think, do really good because.. And this is just my opinion, I don't know what the fuck I'm talking about. But I think people that are great actors or people that are just hyper-vigilant, they're very observant people, (they) pick up on or notice, like, somebody's mannerisms, their gestures, the way their eyes move when they're speaking, their tone of voice when they say certain things, like, the way they connect their words together and how it's different from somebody of a different region who speaks the same language. People that naturally notice stuff like that, like myself, just naturally are better at sounding like a native when they speak or just understanding natives when they speak, you know? Which is why it's so weird that that's something that's not taught in, like, English schools or most courses. A lot of people don't talk about communication. They just talk about language, which is just a part of communication. Like, language shouldn't be the focus, I think. It's part of it, but language is the tool that you use to complete, like a bigger.. To achieve a bigger objective, right, which is (to) communicate. 


[00:09:34] So, getting back to the acting part, people that know how to act and imitate the voices that they hear or the sounds that they hear, or the mannerisms and gestures and things like that, I think (they) have an unfair advantage over everybody else trying to learn not just how to speak the language, but how to speak it like a native and understand the natives and stuff like that. People who are just naturally interested in culture and history and want to know why people say that thing or why they say it that way, or why that's offensive or why that's funny or whatever it is. People were just naturally interested in those things, I think, do a lot better when trying to learn a language. Because all of that influences how we use the language. Who says certain things and why other people don't. Stuff like that, you know? So I look at it that way. 


[00:10:24] And that's another thing. I think I'm going to make a podcast episode about this in the future is having a language role model. That comment about you feeling like an actor ties directly into this other idea. Which is, anybody, listening right now, I strongly recommend that you find what I like to call a language role model. And what that is.. First of all, a role model.. I don't have the textbook definition, but a role model is somebody that you look up to, so to speak, somebody you admire and you try to emulate. So let's say you're a soccer player, that's a universal idea. Your role model could be Messi, for example. That's your favorite player, you love not just the way he plays, but his character, his style, his vision. Something about him makes you want to play like him, right? You identify with him in some way.


[00:11:12] So a language role model, I think, is the same idea. If you're going to learn a language that's quite diverse, like English, for example, I would say.. I would recommend finding one person or one group of people, one accent, one dialect, one region, and focus solely, completely on that. Like, you don't really need to be focused on, like, the Australian dialect, the American dialect, the British dialect, and try to learn and get exposed to all these things. Like, over time, that's cool. You can do that. But in the beginning, pick somebody that speaks in a way that you really appreciate. It could be the president. It could be your favorite actor, could be an athlete, one of your friends. It really doesn't matter who it is. But you like their voice, you like their accent, you like the way in which they speak and all that type of stuff, their vocabulary or whatever it is. Pick that person and try to copy them specifically. Pay much more attention to the way they express themselves, the words that they choose, the way that they pronounce their words and stuff like that. Because it's probably going to be completely different from somebody that's from the other side of that country or the other side of the world.


[00:12:24] So when you do that, when you have a language role model, now you can focus on one way of speaking and just try to copy that. Because when you're listening to a bunch of different kinds of English, you never really know what you're listening to because you don't have the cultural understanding that a native does. So you might think this one way of speaking is very cool, and you just don't know that if you speak that way in this particular setting, people are going to judge you for it or have a particular impression of you. You don't have that cultural understanding yet. So by picking one person, you can learn how is it that they communicate? Is this person formal or informal? Is this person vulgar or not? Do they use a lot of curse words or they use a lot of slang and stuff like that? And then you can decide, "Do I want to speak like that or not?" If the answer is yes, focus on that person. If the answer is no, go find somebody else who speaks in the way you would like to speak and only listen to people that speak that way so that you're constantly hearing what you want to sound like. And then you start to imitate it and you just practice and naturally, you grow like that. Let me know if that makes sense. I don't even know if that idea makes sense when I explain it. I've never explained that to somebody before.


[00:13:33] "Why do some people use them instead of those? Example, 'wash them dishes'." 


[00:13:39] That's an excellent question. And I say that because I'm actually preparing an episode right now about that specifically. So the reason some people say, "Wash them dishes." instead of, "Wash those dishes." is just a question of culture. It's a different dialect of English, formerly known as 'Ebonics', which is the word I prefer. But it's also known as 'Black English', it's also known as 'African-American vernacular English'. So that's the reason. It's just a different dialect of English. Now, why it's said that way in that dialect, I don't know. I have no idea. But that's the reason some people say, "them dishes," some people say, "those dishes." Some people say, "I don't like them people." Some people say, "I don't like those people." You know? Just a different dialect. So there you go.


[00:14:29] You know something else I wanted to talk about, bro? I'm curious to know your opinion on this is. Um, self-flying drones, I cannot wait. A lot of people are afraid of technological advancements and are afraid of just technology in general and artificial intelligence and robots taking jobs and eventually, like, hurting humanity and shit like that. That's possible. But I can tell you one thing I'm super excited for is self-flying drones. Just like they have self-flying, self-flying cars, self-driving cars. We already got those. I think they have self-flying planes, too, bro. I can't confirm that so don't quote me on that. But I think we got self-flying planes. 


[00:15:10] But anyway, a drone, just in case you don't know, D R O N E, a drone is essentially, like, what would you call it? Like, a mini helicopter, a remote control helicopter/plane? I don't fucking know.


[00:15:26] But anyway, the remote-controlled or the self-flying drones, that's what I was talking about. I have a lot of, like, video ideas and content and things I want to make, but I need a cameraman and I don't have one. So when self-flying drones come around... Imagine that. Because drones typically already come with the camera on the bottom. So imagine a world, and this is going to happen, I really believe this, imagine a world in which people are just walking around with, like, this little drone, probably no bigger than my hand, just flying around above them, hovering around over their heads, recording their daily life or recording whatever they want to record. It's like the ultimate vlogging tool at that point.


[00:16:08] Because a lot of people.. What we have now is just, like, the obnoxious scene of, like, somebody walking with a selfie stick. You guys remember those things? The fucking stick that would extend and you put the phone on the end and you're walking around with, like, just this stick in front of you. When you stop and think about how fucking ridiculous selfie sticks actually are... You look fucking ridiculous holding the stick out in front of you, like "Cheese!", you know? Effective, but they look ridiculous. And then you just have people that decided I'm just going to walk with my arm out in front of me, right? Your arm became the selfie stick. At some point, they're going to create a way where you can just throw the device up into the air and it just floats around you. That's going to happen, wouldn't you agree? Would you agree? I think so.


[00:16:55] And I can't wait, because then you can go record.. Imagine the fucking videos that could be made, the vlogs, the documentaries that could be made if there was a piece of technology that was smart enough, like, you'd probably have to wear some type of chip or something that sends off a signal to let the camera know that it's supposed to record you, right, it's always facing you. But then you could just walk around your daily life and the camera always just knows where to be. You click a button and you can say, "Stay at a 45-degree angle, stay at a 90-degree angle.", or whatever, and it just knows to stay there and record you from that angle. You could press a button or do a hand gesture, and it moves to a different angle. That's going to happen, don't you think? They're probably working on that right now, and I will be one of the first customers, you know? You could make so much more dope stuff if I just had my own personal cameraman. And with a drone, it's, like, it's just always there. You don't got to call them and be like, "Hey, can you record today?", you just charge it and turn it on. 


[00:17:55] I don't know, but you know, where else I think technology is going to be very useful and somebody's going to figure out a way to do this, I think in the near future, is by using artificially intelligent robots to teach language. Because we already have virtual reality, augmented reality, artificially intelligent robots that can have conversations with humans. So imagine a robot that speaks all languages, right. Basically, Google Translate, but, like, in one place, speaks and understands all languages and has, like, an authentic voice. So if you switch it to Mandarin, for example, you'll hear an authentic voice of somebody that speaks Mandarin or English or Russian or Japanese, whatever the language is. It'll have all of them on their preloaded. And you can put on the fucking headphones and the goggles and sit there with a microphone and practice your speaking and listening skills.


[00:18:52] You can, like, change the level of intensity. So, like, basic English, the robot will speak to you in basic English, then intermediate, then advanced, and you can change that kind of like a video game. And then it'll have, like, speaking exercises where it will judge your speech. And tell you, "You need to improve in this area or that area or try saying it this way or saying it that way." 150 percent guaranteed, somebody's going to figure out how to do that to where you don't even need some guy like me to teach you these things. You can just go on there and practice with the fucking robot. Obviously, it won't be the same, but it'll be close enough. It'll be close enough. I think we need a few more years for virtual reality to become, let's say, part of a larger consumer base. Like, more people have to have virtual reality in their homes. It has to be more trendy for there to be a business behind it, but somebody is going to figure that out, right? I would think so.


[00:19:51] Going back to what I was talking about in the beginning, like, 20 minutes ago, which is studying the art of communication and not just language. Because you could speak fucking 10 languages and still not know how to have good conversations. Nobody gives a fuck how many languages you speak, it's how you use them that's really important. And language is just as much, just as much about listening as it is about talking. I think it's more about listening. I think communication is much more about listening, for sure. So give it a try, man. Improve your listening skills and you'll start to hear more interesting things. Ain't that some shit? When you listen more attentively, you could be talking to the same person or hear the same type of thing and find something interesting in what was said that you wouldn't be able to find or notice if you weren't actually paying attention or listening. Like, people communicate deep feelings and emotions or, like, give you hints of very interesting stories all the time in casual conversation, and most people never get to dive into those stories or feelings or thoughts or opinions because they're just not paying attention. They're not listening, you know? I don't know if this is making any sense. Again, this is talking about nothing, I'm just sitting here talking. Somebody let me know if it makes sense.


[00:21:17] Who said that? Zach says, "One thing that's missing is opportunities to practice your English." 


[00:21:25] And I agree with that. The only thing is that it can be very difficult to solve that problem because, for example, I'll use what I'm doing as an example. The Life in English VIP membership. And if you're not familiar with what that is, the Life in English VIP membership is essentially a situation in which you can practice or you have the opportunity to practice all aspects of your language, so if you're a Life English VIP, you can read the vocabulary guides and transcripts of every podcast episode so you're improving your reading skills, your comprehension, your listening skills. You can hear what's being said in the podcast and learn new words and expressions and focus on the grammar and stuff like that. So you're listening and you're reading, and then you can join our private conversation group on Discord, which is a place where you get to speak and listen to other real people. So I tried to create an environment in which you can practice all aspects of the language for a relatively low price with real people.


[00:22:24] Now, the challenge that I've noticed since we launched, maybe a month ago, is that even in situations in which people have opportunities to practice their language skills, they don't take advantage of the opportunities. It's the weirdest thing. It's the weirdest thing. There could be 15 people in a group chat and nobody ever says anything. If somebody sends a message there for somebody to respond, nobody responds. It's the weirdest thing. Even when people like, in our case, people are paying money for the membership to be a part of this community and they don't practice. They have access to me. They could send me a direct message. They could call me on the phone any time and they don't.


[00:23:06] So I agree, what most people don't have is an opportunity to practice their English, but what I think is an even bigger problem is that even when people get the opportunity, they don't take advantage of it for whatever reason. Maybe they don't have time, they're afraid, they're nervous they don't care enough, whatever it is. So yes, I think opportunities to practice are lacking across the world, but I also think that it's two other things. 


[00:23:32] One, the lack of incentivization by the teachers for the students to step outside their comfort zone and start communicating and practicing. You know, and that's.. It's arguable if that's the teacher's responsibility or not. Right? But the second thing is just students making a conscious choice not to practice when they have the opportunity and then complaining about it later. And I'm not saying you, specifically, that made the comment. I'm just saying that's one thing I've noticed. Is that.. You know, you can lead a horse.. Here's an idiom for you in the English idiom, and you probably say this in other languages, you can lead a horse to water, but you cannot make the horse drink. In other words, like, you can teach a student the language, but you can't make them talk. That's probably the equivalent expression or idiom in this case. So I can teach you everything you need to know, but if you're not willing to take the risk and express yourself or be corrected or whatever it is, then it's all meaningless. At the end of the day, it's on you.


[00:24:41] "I understand all the ideas, but I have problems to talk or express my ideas."


[00:24:46] Yeah, this is the problem of most people, man. I hear that, like, on a daily basis where you can understand everything you hear, but you can't respond the way you would like to. And a lot of people don't like to hear this, but it really is just because you're not speaking enough. Just like everything else in life. It literally is like everything else in life, everything else that you have to learn in life. Like, you weren't a master shoe-tier when you were a kid, but eventually, you learned how to tie your shoes and now you don't think about it. It's just second nature. You didn't brush your teeth perfectly the first time, (but) you did it. Then you just do it every day, hopefully, right? Taking a bath or learning how to write, your handwriting at 7 years old (is) probably, hopefully, different from your handwriting at 27 or 37. The words that you choose are different from the words you chose when you were 7 years old. You know, if you've been learning how to play an instrument, you were probably trash in the beginning.. And probably still trash now. No, I'm just kidding. 


[00:25:49] But, it takes time, is the point. Any skill. And learning how to express yourself in any language is a skill. So it takes time. And listening always comes before the speaking because it's something that.. It's input, not output, it's easier to consume than it is to produce, I think. So, I think that's why the listening part comes first, and that gets easier before the speaking does. because when you're speaking, you have to try again and again and again and again and again. It's something that you have to do and make the effort to do. And a lot of people are comfortable, just like sitting back and listening, and they feel good that they can listen. And then it's just this constant cycle where every time they try to express themselves, it's difficult and they feel like shit or they feel like it's just taking too long. Well, it's because you don't do it enough. If you only go to the gym once a month, you're never going to lose those 30 pounds, bro. Good luck. You know, you telling.. "Yeah, I'm going to the gym, I'm in the gym, I'm working out, I'm getting her done!" And they don't know you're in there once every 30 fucking days, bro. And that's, that's most of you. Most of you. "Yeah. I'm learning English, I'm trying hard, watching Netflix every night. 7 O'Clock, baby! My favorite program!" But you're not talking to anybody, ever... Ever. So that's my, that's my recommendation to you and you and anybody else, is just practice more, bro. 


[00:27:17] Like, I do these lives, they're fun. I like teaching. I try to give away the tips, I try to do the podcast and stuff like that, stuff that you can't do on your own. But at the end of the day, like, the talking part, that's what's missing for most people. And it's the one thing that a teacher can't influence or control or improve without somebody who's willing to do it. Like, you, you know, I can teach you it all, but if you're not willing to take the risk and practice and be consistent, then I don't know what to tell you, bro. Just wasting time. You know? 


[00:27:55] "How did you learn to speak both Spanish and English so well?"


[00:28:00] Well, English is my first language, so that's not really fair. I had no choice. Spanish, I wouldn't say I speak it very well, but I learned to speak Spanish doing everything that I tell people to do every fucking day on this TikTok app, on YouTube, on my podcast, I did exactly what I'm telling you to do, which is practice every fucking day. That's it. Like, and everything else that everybody does, bro. Like, I watched novelas every day after class. They were an hour long. I would watch at least one every day. Listening to music and translating the song lyrics. I would go to the Mexican grocery store instead of the American one, and I would try to talk to people in the Mexican grocery store in Spanish as opposed to going to the American one and speaking English. Shit like that. 


[00:28:47] Whenever... And I lived in.. It wasn't really.. How can I say this? At that time, I was living in San Diego and there's hundreds, thousands, maybe millions of Mexicans and other Latinos in that city. So every time I'm in the street, there's somebody near me that speaks Spanish. So every time I heard somebody speaking Spanish, I would walk over to them and try to start a conversation, stuff like that. I would just try to live my life in Spanish. I would only speak Spanish with my Mexican friends. Then I went to Mexico for six weeks. So I was just trying every way I could to force Spanish into my life. And then I learned how to speak it. That was it. Same thing with Portuguese. 


[00:29:26] So I'm not saying all this, like, "Oh, just live your life in English, just practice more, just talk more.", because it sounds good because it sounds cool or it's, you know, like different from what everybody else is saying. This is just like common sense. And I don't.. I don't say that to like sound arrogant or like I'm looking down at you, like, "How do you not know this?", because I didn't know either. When I learned my first foreign language, I didn't know how to do it. I just did what made sense and kind of figured it out. And it seems like people all around the world, even right now, don't understand the basic concept, which is, language gets learned the same way every single time. So the same way you learn the first one, just learn the second one. You know what I mean? Don't have to overcomplicate the process. Just live your life in English, you see what I did there? Yeah.


[00:30:16] "Do you like camping? And what do you think about IT?"


[00:30:25] Or "What do you think about IT?" I don't know if you're asking me, what do I think about camping or what do I think about IT because IT is capitalized, but anyway, I'll answer the first half of your question. Do I like camping? I've never been camping for real. Like, I've.. I remember when I was in fifth grade, which was.. I was probably, like, ten years old. My school organized, like, this field trip to where all the fifth graders were going to go to camp, but it wasn't really camp. Like, we all got in these buses and they took us out to the woods, but we stayed in, like, cabins on bunk beds, and that's not really camping. That's just like a hotel in the middle of the forest. You feel me? So it wasn't really camping, like for real, for real, where you go out there by yourself with a tent, catch and cook your own food type of shit. I've never done that.


[00:31:18] Would I enjoy it? I think I could, depending on who I was with. Because be honest with you.. And also how long we're going to be out there, like, if it's, you know, three or four days, cool. Let's do it and see what happens. But somebody who's out there for like a month just surviving in the fucking forest, I'm like, "Nah, I'm good. I'm cool" So it depends on what you mean by camping, if you mean literally like pitching a tent and sleeping outside for the next, you know, 14 to 30 days, the answer is no, I don't like how that sounds. You know, I could do it, but it's not like my idea of a good time. You feel me? Like, I like being in nature for sure. I like being in the woods for sure, but for, like, some extended period of time... Nah.


[00:32:11] "Our teacher saying to us that he hates school."


[00:32:14] Yeah, man, fuck school, bro. I didn't say fuck education. I said fuck school because traditional school is, like, so painfully outdated on purpose... On purpose, in my opinion. It's so painfully outdated, the way they do things is fucking stupid. It is not an environment that encourages what I think learning and education is about. It's not an environment that encourages being open-minded, challenging, like, the norm or standards, thinking critically, healthy debate, studying things you're actually interested in, studying shit that you actually need to know to survive after you leave this place. Public school doesn't really focus on or teach any of that shit. And yet they still expect you to be there from 8 a.m. to fucking 3 p.m., at least in the U.S. I don't know how you do it in your country. But when I was in school, every day, for 13 years, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. That's 7 out of 24 hours. Like.. Almost a third of your day, which is.. Means almost a third of your life from Monday to Friday, you're sitting in a fucking classroom, listening to somebody trying to convince you that you need to know what year fucking Abraham Lincoln died. Fuck school.


[00:33:49] All right, another question, "How do I think in English?" 


[00:33:52] There's been a lot of videos and podcast episodes made about this subject. I don't know if I've ever given my opinion. I probably have, because I always say the same shit. It's very simple. I think the way you learn to think in English is by thinking in English. Like... That's it and what I mean.. Let me not be an asshole. What I mean when I say that is I think writing probably is the best way to learn how to think in English. Now, I have made a podcast episode about that. I don't remember what number it is, but if you go to lifeinenglish.net/episodes, it's somewhere in there. You'll find it the title. I think it's called How Writing Can Make You A Better Speaker. And the basic idea that I'm going to condense and give to you right now is that there's very, very little difference between writing and thinking. The only difference is that when you're writing, you have more time to organize your thoughts before you record them. That's it.


[00:34:45] But in order to write something on the paper, you have to think it with your brain first, right? You can't write without thinking about what you're.. I mean, I guess you could, but you couldn't write a sentence, a clear and logical sentence without thinking about it first. So if you're writing in English, you're thinking in English, and the benefit, again, of writing is that you have as much time as you.. As you want or as you need. You can open up a Google document, which is free. You clearly have access to the internet because you're listening to or watching this right now. So it's fucking free. You can open Google Docs pick a subject. "What did I do today?" And start writing about what you did today, which means you're literally thinking about what you did today and you're doing it in English. And then what's going to happen when you start doing that is eventually you're going to get to a word or a phrase or an expression or an idea that you do not know how to express.


[00:35:37] "Fuck, what do I do now?" Then you go to Google Translate. You translate the word or the phrase or the expression, and then you keep going. Or you call up your friend, your language exchange partner, or your teacher if you have one. If you don't have one, you should get one. And you ask them, "How do I say this? How do I say that? Does this sound natural? Is there another way to say that? Is this formal or informal?" That's when you start to do those things, but then you always come back to the writing, which is the same thing as thinking. If you're just doing it every day again, all the solutions that I have to all your problems.. The problem is it takes time. So you just got to be patient and consistent, but that's literally it. So by writing every day training your brain to produce thoughts in English because that's all you're doing is producing thoughts and then writing them down.


[00:36:21] You just.. It's like going to the gym. Every day you're lifting the same weight. As long as you keep eating and going to the gym, drinking water, resting when necessary, you're going to get bigger muscles. It's the same thing with learning how to do everything else. So if you want to learn how to think in English, go to the mental gym and just think every day. Produce thoughts every day. Writing is the easiest way to do that because the piece of paper is not waiting for you to respond or be interesting or be perfect like you think a human being is doing. The piece of paper is just like, "Fucking write, something on me, bro. Take your time. Take as long as you want. I'm not going anywhere. I'm not going to say anything. I'm not going to judge you."


[00:37:01] So if you want to learn how to think in English, learn how to write in English because writing is the same thing as thinking. And there's less pressure. And if you're doing it online, then you have Google Translate. So... And just do that consistently over months or years and you just wake up one day and you realize, like, "Shit, I'm not even trying." You just start producing these thoughts in the foreign language without even trying because you've just been doing it so long. Just like your native language, bro, that's like the same thing, the same thing. With your native language, you just have these thoughts. Sometimes you're not even trying. These thoughts just enter your mind in a language that's familiar to you because you've been producing thoughts in that language for so long. You just do it. You just do it. Like everything else. 


[00:37:54] Like, once you learn how to drive a car after a few years, you just get in the car, turn the key, start the car, and you just go. You don't think, like, "What do I do with this hand? And where did I put this foot?" You don't think like that because you've done it so many times. You've driven a car every single day. It's second nature. So literally any skill that you want to learn. That's how you do it. Just do it every day over a long period of time, obviously trying to get better. Don't practice bad shit or incorrect shit. But that's it, man. That's it. Patience, persistence, repetition, like, that's it.


[00:38:33] You know, I'm a ready, fire, aim type of guy, you know? I don't know if you know about this concept, but like, imagine in the military where everyone has weapons, you got an assault rifle and we're at fucking target practice and the instructor will say, "Ready!" So you get your gun ready. Then he says, "Aim!", which means point your gun at the target you want to hit. And then he says, "Fire!", which is when you squeeze the trigger and you shoot the gun. So, ready, aim, fire. 


[00:38:58] But me, I'm like a ready, fire, aim kind of guy. Like, ready, and then bam, and then we aim, you know. Shoot first, ask questions later. Yeah. I feel like you get more done that way. Make more mistakes, but you learn more as well, right? You don't learn from thinking, you learn from doing. Sometimes you just gotta fucking do it and see what happens. In life in general, but also in English, trying to make this relevant to you. You know, maybe you do have opportunities to practice your English like we were talking about earlier in this actual episode, and you're just too afraid to take advantage of the opportunities. Sometimes you just gotta fucking go for it. Worry about the consequences when they come, you know, cross the bridges when you get to them, not before.


[00:39:51] All right. That's another English idiom for you. A lot of times in English, when we're worried about something that might happen in the future. We get all stressed and anxious, even though it's in the future, it's not real, it doesn't exist yet. It's just this imaginary idea that we believe is going to happen at some point. And a lot of times you can say, "I'm going to cross that bridge when I get to it." What that means is I will worry about that problem when the time is right. Because if the problem isn't affecting my present life, if it's something that hasn't even happened yet, it's only possible that it happens in the future, there's no reason for me to worry about it or do anything about it. Right? 


[00:40:31] So if the bridge is 5 miles down the road, I can't cross it right now, so why am I thinking about the bridge? I'll cross that bridge when I get to it or when I arrive at the bridge, then it's time to think about how we're going to cross this bridge or how we're going to deal with this problem. So I'll cross that bridge when I get to it. If you didn't know now, you know.


[00:40:52] You only have trouble doing something when you're nervous because you're focused on the fact that you're nervous. Like, being nervous is a normal thing, and a lot of times we confuse anxiety with excitement. So sometimes you just might be excited and you think that you're nervous or anxious, but that's beside the point. What I'm trying to say is in those moments, stop focusing on the fact that you're nervous, stop focusing on how you feel and focus on the person in front of you. A lot of times people, like, lock up and get frozen and don't know what to do or what to say because they're so focused on the fact that they're locked up and frozen and they don't know what to do or what to say. That's all they can think about, and they just let that negative feedback loop continue forever.


[00:41:37] But if you notice that you're nervous or you're anxious or whatever it is, there's a bunch of stuff you could do, breathing techniques and mindfulness exercises and all that shit. But it's just having the presence of mind to realize, "Maybe I'm nervous and that's OK. But this is just another person." And by focusing on what that person is doing or thinking or saying or how they're behaving instead of focusing on yourself, you don't have time to be nervous. You don't have time, you don't have the mental capacity to be thinking and focusing on what you're doing and feeling and saying and what they're doing and feeling and saying, you can only do one at a time, so focus on them. All right.


[00:42:15] Yo, it's about to be 5. I've been here for 2 and a half motherfucking hours. It didn't feel like it though, right? I didn't feel 2 and a half hours pass, but I'm about to go, y'all. So what's today? Friday? I don't know when this episode is coming out for those of you that are not here, live with me right now. I mean, just transcribing this fucking thing.. Jesus Christ! We're going to see how that goes. But anyway, I just wanted to come say, what's up, y'all, talk about nothing for a little bit and get on out of here. It was supposed to be a 30-minute episode. It turned out to be 2 and a half hours.


[00:42:51] But some quick updates, man. I got more videos coming on TikTok next week, for sure. Definitely, more podcast episodes coming out. I believe, I don't know, I haven't decided yet, in the next podcast episode, we're going to be talking about Ebonics, Black English, African-American Vernacular English. It's known by many different names, but I think it's time to talk about that. It's just going to take some time to do, like, all the research and prepare the episode and then record it and edit it and all those things. But I think that's what's next on the Life in English podcast. And then after doing a couple of polls and asking a few people some questions, getting back to more English lessons on the YouTube channel as well. So if you follow or listen or watch on YouTube, you might have noticed that recently all I've been posting there is the podcast episodes, but I plan to get back to more lessons about English and just American culture and stuff like that. So a little bit of everything until I figure out what you guys need the most, what you guys like the most, and what's the most fun to make, I guess.


[00:43:50] But that's it, man. I don't know when the next live stream is going to be, probably next Friday, probably. I can't say for sure, but most likely next Friday. I'm gonna try to figure out how to, like, do the.. How to schedule it so that when you come to my profile, you can see when the next one is going to be. I might try to figure that out right now, but if I don't just know that most likely next Friday afternoon, around 1:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, most likely. I gotta keep saying that, most likely, I'll be live again and I'll come and say, what's up to y'all. 


[00:44:27] Now, if you're still with me listening at this point, I just want to say one more time. If you want to send me a message, like, don't be afraid to shoot me a message, bro, I try to respond to all of them. I don't always manage to do that. But if you have a question, you just want to say, "What's up?" You want to recommend that I talk about a certain subject, whatever it is. Don't be afraid to send your boy a message, man, and say, "what's up?" You know? I love y'all, man. I appreciate y'all. Hopefully, you're getting value from the videos and the podcast episodes and all the other stuff that's coming in the future. Hopefully, you enjoyed this episode of this live stream. You know what I'm saying. 


[00:45:01] And I'm gonna see y'all, again, most likely.. Most likely next Friday around. 1:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. But we'll see. All right, but that's it for. I didn't even do the intro, bro. What's up, everybody? You are listening to another episode of Life in English. I'm your host, Tony Kaizen. And the intro is now the outro. So hopefully you enjoyed it and I'm gonna get y'all later. Peace!


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[00:00:00] "How do I know if my English is good?"


[00:00:04] I don't think I've ever been asked that question before. How do I know if my English is good?


[00:00:13] That's a good question. Give me a second, I'm gonna think about that because that's a good question.


[00:00:22] I think there's a few ways you can know if your English is actually good. In no particular order, here they are.


[00:00:30] The first one is if you just find yourself randomly thinking in English just because... I think that's the point where, you know, like, I'm.. My brain is really starting to accept the fact that I speak more than one language, or that this new language is important and therefore it needs to be remembered. You see what I'm saying? When you just randomly find yourself having thoughts in English or saying things in English, or even when somebody in your native language is talking to you in your native language and you just naturally want to respond with an expression or a word in English because it just feels better. That's how I think you know your your your level is increasing or improving.


[00:01:08] The other one is when you don't find yourself making an effort to understand spoken English. That's how you know, like, you're really starting to understand the language, because in the beginning, as a beginner, even an intermediate speaker sometimes, you have to focus on what's being said to understand what's being said. Like, you can't be on the computer typing or reading a blog article and then understand the TV in the foreign language because it's just not as normal for your brain, as your native language. But if your native language is on the TV, you can be reading a book and the words, the audio from the TV are entering your brain and you can still understand every single word that's being said without trying. It's your native language. So when you can do that in the foreign language, that's how you know, "OK, I've reached a pretty high level." Because the sound is just entering my brain and being interpreted and understood without me having to focus on it. It's just background noise, but I still understand every word. When that started happening, for me, that's how I knew I really understand this language, you know? So I think that's a good sign.


[00:02:15] Also, I think when. You don't necessarily feel a difference between the way that you... How can I say that accurately? You know how when you're learning the foreign language, especially in the beginning, you feel like a different person when you're speaking the foreign language because it's a completely different way of expressing yourself. Like, the intonation, the word choice, the grammar, everything is just fucking different. So you don't even have, like, the mental capacity to focus on being yourself and expressing yourself. I don't know if that makes sense. But there comes a point where you reach a good enough level to where you don't have to think about the actual words that you're choosing or the way you're expressing yourself or how it sounds when it comes out of your mouth, you're just talking because you're so comfortable with the language. So when you get to that point, you can just be yourself, you know? 


[00:03:12] Which is interesting to think about, too, because there's an idea that we have different personalities when we speak different languages. And people have told me before, like, "You sound different, you act different when you speak Portuguese or Spanish or English. Your voice changes." and stuff like that. And I never really thought about it. But there might be some truth to that. Let me know if you're watching this live on TikTok, let me know in the comments. Do you feel different? Do you feel like your personality or your voice changes when you speak a foreign language? Because I think when you get to that point where maybe you act different or your mannerisms or your voice changes when you're speaking that foreign language, but you feel like you can be yourself 100 percent because you don't have to think about the language. I think that's when, you know, "I've gotten to a good level where I'm not even thinking about the words I'm saying, I'm just saying them."


[00:04:01] Because that's what you do with your native language, right? Like, you might think before you speak in your native language, but you're thinking about what you want to say or how you want to say it and not the actual individual words, like, "Where does 'the' go in the sentence? Where does the adverb go? Does the grammar.. or does the verb go at the beginning or the end of the sentence in this language?" You're not thinking about shit like that. So I think when you get to that point, it's like, "OK, I'm doing pretty good."


[00:04:32] I think also when you consistently have positive interactions with other people. And I don't mean, like, people just like you or, like, you're a more likable person. But I mean, when you're trying to communicate with somebody, you have an objective to either receive or transmit a message. And when you can consistently receive and transmit messages with multiple people, Without having any, like, major problems, then, you know, "I'm doing good." Because a lot of times in the beginning, like, there's a whole bunch of misunderstandings or you get lost all the time, there's a bunch of words you don't understand that this person is saying or you can't express basic ideas, or you can't talk about a bunch of different subjects, right? And for that reason, you don't have consistently positive experiences trying to express yourself in this language. But when time, after time, after time, it's positive, like, "I said what I wanted to say, I could express myself. I understood, you know, 75, 80, 90 percent of what they said." Doing pretty good.


[00:05:36] Other people say, like, once you start dreaming in the language, then, you know, like, "I've reached this really high level." But I've never had a dream in Spanish or Portuguese. I actually don't have dreams. It's not.. That's not a fair thing to say because I actually don't really have dreams like that. That might sound like a weird thing to say. But I have probably, like, six or seven dreams every year. Like, I'm one of those people that goes to sleep and it's just darkness. From the time I go to sleep to the time I wake up, there's no dream. Like, since I was a kid, like, a really young age. I don't even remember as a kid having a bunch of dreams. I know I had them, but I would say since like 12 or 13 years old, nothing. For sure since, like, 14 or 15. No dreams. I go to sleep and it's just darkness. Nothing. So I don't even have dreams in English, getting back to the point, I don't even have dreams in English. So I'm probably not the best person to say whether or not dreams in a foreign language is an indicator that you've reached a high level because I've reached a high level in Spanish and Portuguese, but I don't dream in those languages.


[00:06:47] The only time I know for sure I'm going to have a dream is if I get drunk before I go to sleep. I don't know why, but I know, like, I've noticed if I drink a lot of alcohol before I go to sleep, I'm gonna have a dream that night and it's going to be some wild, fucking crazy dream. Just... like, all dreams can be random and wild and crazy, but when I drink before I go to sleep, they're just the weirdest, most random dreams. But that's the only time. Every other night, for years now, just darkness.


[00:07:23] "Yes, I also feel like I'm acting when I speak in English."


[00:07:28] Actually, that's a really interesting comment. What's your name? Dominic? Dominic, that's what we're going to call you. That's the first half of your screen name. So, Dominic, that's an interesting comment. You feel like you're acting when you're speaking English. I think.. This is something I've thought about for a long time, but never really formulated my actual idea. But I think some particular people that will have a lot of success learning foreign languages are people that know how to act. And what I mean when I say that is learning a language isn't just about learning new words. That's, like, half the battle. That might not even be half the battle. Because obviously, it's important, but language is so much more than just words and letters. Hopefully, we can agree on that. It's, like, energy. It's emotion being communicated. There's physical gestures that we do based on the language that we speak and the country we grew up in. That's also language, like, it's just one part of communication. 


[00:08:29] But anyway, people that know how to act, I think, do really good because.. And this is just my opinion, I don't know what the fuck I'm talking about. But I think people that are great actors or people that are just hyper-vigilant, they're very observant people, (they) pick up on or notice, like, somebody's mannerisms, their gestures, the way their eyes move when they're speaking, their tone of voice when they say certain things, like, the way they connect their words together and how it's different from somebody of a different region who speaks the same language. People that naturally notice stuff like that, like myself, just naturally are better at sounding like a native when they speak or just understanding natives when they speak, you know? Which is why it's so weird that that's something that's not taught in, like, English schools or most courses. A lot of people don't talk about communication. They just talk about language, which is just a part of communication. Like, language shouldn't be the focus, I think. It's part of it, but language is the tool that you use to complete, like a bigger.. To achieve a bigger objective, right, which is (to) communicate. 


[00:09:34] So, getting back to the acting part, people that know how to act and imitate the voices that they hear or the sounds that they hear, or the mannerisms and gestures and things like that, I think (they) have an unfair advantage over everybody else trying to learn not just how to speak the language, but how to speak it like a native and understand the natives and stuff like that. People who are just naturally interested in culture and history and want to know why people say that thing or why they say it that way, or why that's offensive or why that's funny or whatever it is. People were just naturally interested in those things, I think, do a lot better when trying to learn a language. Because all of that influences how we use the language. Who says certain things and why other people don't. Stuff like that, you know? So I look at it that way. 


[00:10:24] And that's another thing. I think I'm going to make a podcast episode about this in the future is having a language role model. That comment about you feeling like an actor ties directly into this other idea. Which is, anybody, listening right now, I strongly recommend that you find what I like to call a language role model. And what that is.. First of all, a role model.. I don't have the textbook definition, but a role model is somebody that you look up to, so to speak, somebody you admire and you try to emulate. So let's say you're a soccer player, that's a universal idea. Your role model could be Messi, for example. That's your favorite player, you love not just the way he plays, but his character, his style, his vision. Something about him makes you want to play like him, right? You identify with him in some way.


[00:11:12] So a language role model, I think, is the same idea. If you're going to learn a language that's quite diverse, like English, for example, I would say.. I would recommend finding one person or one group of people, one accent, one dialect, one region, and focus solely, completely on that. Like, you don't really need to be focused on, like, the Australian dialect, the American dialect, the British dialect, and try to learn and get exposed to all these things. Like, over time, that's cool. You can do that. But in the beginning, pick somebody that speaks in a way that you really appreciate. It could be the president. It could be your favorite actor, could be an athlete, one of your friends. It really doesn't matter who it is. But you like their voice, you like their accent, you like the way in which they speak and all that type of stuff, their vocabulary or whatever it is. Pick that person and try to copy them specifically. Pay much more attention to the way they express themselves, the words that they choose, the way that they pronounce their words and stuff like that. Because it's probably going to be completely different from somebody that's from the other side of that country or the other side of the world.


[00:12:24] So when you do that, when you have a language role model, now you can focus on one way of speaking and just try to copy that. Because when you're listening to a bunch of different kinds of English, you never really know what you're listening to because you don't have the cultural understanding that a native does. So you might think this one way of speaking is very cool, and you just don't know that if you speak that way in this particular setting, people are going to judge you for it or have a particular impression of you. You don't have that cultural understanding yet. So by picking one person, you can learn how is it that they communicate? Is this person formal or informal? Is this person vulgar or not? Do they use a lot of curse words or they use a lot of slang and stuff like that? And then you can decide, "Do I want to speak like that or not?" If the answer is yes, focus on that person. If the answer is no, go find somebody else who speaks in the way you would like to speak and only listen to people that speak that way so that you're constantly hearing what you want to sound like. And then you start to imitate it and you just practice and naturally, you grow like that. Let me know if that makes sense. I don't even know if that idea makes sense when I explain it. I've never explained that to somebody before.


[00:13:33] "Why do some people use them instead of those? Example, 'wash them dishes'." 


[00:13:39] That's an excellent question. And I say that because I'm actually preparing an episode right now about that specifically. So the reason some people say, "Wash them dishes." instead of, "Wash those dishes." is just a question of culture. It's a different dialect of English, formerly known as 'Ebonics', which is the word I prefer. But it's also known as 'Black English', it's also known as 'African-American vernacular English'. So that's the reason. It's just a different dialect of English. Now, why it's said that way in that dialect, I don't know. I have no idea. But that's the reason some people say, "them dishes," some people say, "those dishes." Some people say, "I don't like them people." Some people say, "I don't like those people." You know? Just a different dialect. So there you go.


[00:14:29] You know something else I wanted to talk about, bro? I'm curious to know your opinion on this is. Um, self-flying drones, I cannot wait. A lot of people are afraid of technological advancements and are afraid of just technology in general and artificial intelligence and robots taking jobs and eventually, like, hurting humanity and shit like that. That's possible. But I can tell you one thing I'm super excited for is self-flying drones. Just like they have self-flying, self-flying cars, self-driving cars. We already got those. I think they have self-flying planes, too, bro. I can't confirm that so don't quote me on that. But I think we got self-flying planes. 


[00:15:10] But anyway, a drone, just in case you don't know, D R O N E, a drone is essentially, like, what would you call it? Like, a mini helicopter, a remote control helicopter/plane? I don't fucking know.


[00:15:26] But anyway, the remote-controlled or the self-flying drones, that's what I was talking about. I have a lot of, like, video ideas and content and things I want to make, but I need a cameraman and I don't have one. So when self-flying drones come around... Imagine that. Because drones typically already come with the camera on the bottom. So imagine a world, and this is going to happen, I really believe this, imagine a world in which people are just walking around with, like, this little drone, probably no bigger than my hand, just flying around above them, hovering around over their heads, recording their daily life or recording whatever they want to record. It's like the ultimate vlogging tool at that point.


[00:16:08] Because a lot of people.. What we have now is just, like, the obnoxious scene of, like, somebody walking with a selfie stick. You guys remember those things? The fucking stick that would extend and you put the phone on the end and you're walking around with, like, just this stick in front of you. When you stop and think about how fucking ridiculous selfie sticks actually are... You look fucking ridiculous holding the stick out in front of you, like "Cheese!", you know? Effective, but they look ridiculous. And then you just have people that decided I'm just going to walk with my arm out in front of me, right? Your arm became the selfie stick. At some point, they're going to create a way where you can just throw the device up into the air and it just floats around you. That's going to happen, wouldn't you agree? Would you agree? I think so.


[00:16:55] And I can't wait, because then you can go record.. Imagine the fucking videos that could be made, the vlogs, the documentaries that could be made if there was a piece of technology that was smart enough, like, you'd probably have to wear some type of chip or something that sends off a signal to let the camera know that it's supposed to record you, right, it's always facing you. But then you could just walk around your daily life and the camera always just knows where to be. You click a button and you can say, "Stay at a 45-degree angle, stay at a 90-degree angle.", or whatever, and it just knows to stay there and record you from that angle. You could press a button or do a hand gesture, and it moves to a different angle. That's going to happen, don't you think? They're probably working on that right now, and I will be one of the first customers, you know? You could make so much more dope stuff if I just had my own personal cameraman. And with a drone, it's, like, it's just always there. You don't got to call them and be like, "Hey, can you record today?", you just charge it and turn it on. 


[00:17:55] I don't know, but you know, where else I think technology is going to be very useful and somebody's going to figure out a way to do this, I think in the near future, is by using artificially intelligent robots to teach language. Because we already have virtual reality, augmented reality, artificially intelligent robots that can have conversations with humans. So imagine a robot that speaks all languages, right. Basically, Google Translate, but, like, in one place, speaks and understands all languages and has, like, an authentic voice. So if you switch it to Mandarin, for example, you'll hear an authentic voice of somebody that speaks Mandarin or English or Russian or Japanese, whatever the language is. It'll have all of them on their preloaded. And you can put on the fucking headphones and the goggles and sit there with a microphone and practice your speaking and listening skills.


[00:18:52] You can, like, change the level of intensity. So, like, basic English, the robot will speak to you in basic English, then intermediate, then advanced, and you can change that kind of like a video game. And then it'll have, like, speaking exercises where it will judge your speech. And tell you, "You need to improve in this area or that area or try saying it this way or saying it that way." 150 percent guaranteed, somebody's going to figure out how to do that to where you don't even need some guy like me to teach you these things. You can just go on there and practice with the fucking robot. Obviously, it won't be the same, but it'll be close enough. It'll be close enough. I think we need a few more years for virtual reality to become, let's say, part of a larger consumer base. Like, more people have to have virtual reality in their homes. It has to be more trendy for there to be a business behind it, but somebody is going to figure that out, right? I would think so.


[00:19:51] Going back to what I was talking about in the beginning, like, 20 minutes ago, which is studying the art of communication and not just language. Because you could speak fucking 10 languages and still not know how to have good conversations. Nobody gives a fuck how many languages you speak, it's how you use them that's really important. And language is just as much, just as much about listening as it is about talking. I think it's more about listening. I think communication is much more about listening, for sure. So give it a try, man. Improve your listening skills and you'll start to hear more interesting things. Ain't that some shit? When you listen more attentively, you could be talking to the same person or hear the same type of thing and find something interesting in what was said that you wouldn't be able to find or notice if you weren't actually paying attention or listening. Like, people communicate deep feelings and emotions or, like, give you hints of very interesting stories all the time in casual conversation, and most people never get to dive into those stories or feelings or thoughts or opinions because they're just not paying attention. They're not listening, you know? I don't know if this is making any sense. Again, this is talking about nothing, I'm just sitting here talking. Somebody let me know if it makes sense.


[00:21:17] Who said that? Zach says, "One thing that's missing is opportunities to practice your English." 


[00:21:25] And I agree with that. The only thing is that it can be very difficult to solve that problem because, for example, I'll use what I'm doing as an example. The Life in English VIP membership. And if you're not familiar with what that is, the Life in English VIP membership is essentially a situation in which you can practice or you have the opportunity to practice all aspects of your language, so if you're a Life English VIP, you can read the vocabulary guides and transcripts of every podcast episode so you're improving your reading skills, your comprehension, your listening skills. You can hear what's being said in the podcast and learn new words and expressions and focus on the grammar and stuff like that. So you're listening and you're reading, and then you can join our private conversation group on Discord, which is a place where you get to speak and listen to other real people. So I tried to create an environment in which you can practice all aspects of the language for a relatively low price with real people.


[00:22:24] Now, the challenge that I've noticed since we launched, maybe a month ago, is that even in situations in which people have opportunities to practice their language skills, they don't take advantage of the opportunities. It's the weirdest thing. It's the weirdest thing. There could be 15 people in a group chat and nobody ever says anything. If somebody sends a message there for somebody to respond, nobody responds. It's the weirdest thing. Even when people like, in our case, people are paying money for the membership to be a part of this community and they don't practice. They have access to me. They could send me a direct message. They could call me on the phone any time and they don't.


[00:23:06] So I agree, what most people don't have is an opportunity to practice their English, but what I think is an even bigger problem is that even when people get the opportunity, they don't take advantage of it for whatever reason. Maybe they don't have time, they're afraid, they're nervous they don't care enough, whatever it is. So yes, I think opportunities to practice are lacking across the world, but I also think that it's two other things. 


[00:23:32] One, the lack of incentivization by the teachers for the students to step outside their comfort zone and start communicating and practicing. You know, and that's.. It's arguable if that's the teacher's responsibility or not. Right? But the second thing is just students making a conscious choice not to practice when they have the opportunity and then complaining about it later. And I'm not saying you, specifically, that made the comment. I'm just saying that's one thing I've noticed. Is that.. You know, you can lead a horse.. Here's an idiom for you in the English idiom, and you probably say this in other languages, you can lead a horse to water, but you cannot make the horse drink. In other words, like, you can teach a student the language, but you can't make them talk. That's probably the equivalent expression or idiom in this case. So I can teach you everything you need to know, but if you're not willing to take the risk and express yourself or be corrected or whatever it is, then it's all meaningless. At the end of the day, it's on you.


[00:24:41] "I understand all the ideas, but I have problems to talk or express my ideas."


[00:24:46] Yeah, this is the problem of most people, man. I hear that, like, on a daily basis where you can understand everything you hear, but you can't respond the way you would like to. And a lot of people don't like to hear this, but it really is just because you're not speaking enough. Just like everything else in life. It literally is like everything else in life, everything else that you have to learn in life. Like, you weren't a master shoe-tier when you were a kid, but eventually, you learned how to tie your shoes and now you don't think about it. It's just second nature. You didn't brush your teeth perfectly the first time, (but) you did it. Then you just do it every day, hopefully, right? Taking a bath or learning how to write, your handwriting at 7 years old (is) probably, hopefully, different from your handwriting at 27 or 37. The words that you choose are different from the words you chose when you were 7 years old. You know, if you've been learning how to play an instrument, you were probably trash in the beginning.. And probably still trash now. No, I'm just kidding. 


[00:25:49] But, it takes time, is the point. Any skill. And learning how to express yourself in any language is a skill. So it takes time. And listening always comes before the speaking because it's something that.. It's input, not output, it's easier to consume than it is to produce, I think. So, I think that's why the listening part comes first, and that gets easier before the speaking does. because when you're speaking, you have to try again and again and again and again and again. It's something that you have to do and make the effort to do. And a lot of people are comfortable, just like sitting back and listening, and they feel good that they can listen. And then it's just this constant cycle where every time they try to express themselves, it's difficult and they feel like shit or they feel like it's just taking too long. Well, it's because you don't do it enough. If you only go to the gym once a month, you're never going to lose those 30 pounds, bro. Good luck. You know, you telling.. "Yeah, I'm going to the gym, I'm in the gym, I'm working out, I'm getting her done!" And they don't know you're in there once every 30 fucking days, bro. And that's, that's most of you. Most of you. "Yeah. I'm learning English, I'm trying hard, watching Netflix every night. 7 O'Clock, baby! My favorite program!" But you're not talking to anybody, ever... Ever. So that's my, that's my recommendation to you and you and anybody else, is just practice more, bro. 


[00:27:17] Like, I do these lives, they're fun. I like teaching. I try to give away the tips, I try to do the podcast and stuff like that, stuff that you can't do on your own. But at the end of the day, like, the talking part, that's what's missing for most people. And it's the one thing that a teacher can't influence or control or improve without somebody who's willing to do it. Like, you, you know, I can teach you it all, but if you're not willing to take the risk and practice and be consistent, then I don't know what to tell you, bro. Just wasting time. You know? 


[00:27:55] "How did you learn to speak both Spanish and English so well?"


[00:28:00] Well, English is my first language, so that's not really fair. I had no choice. Spanish, I wouldn't say I speak it very well, but I learned to speak Spanish doing everything that I tell people to do every fucking day on this TikTok app, on YouTube, on my podcast, I did exactly what I'm telling you to do, which is practice every fucking day. That's it. Like, and everything else that everybody does, bro. Like, I watched novelas every day after class. They were an hour long. I would watch at least one every day. Listening to music and translating the song lyrics. I would go to the Mexican grocery store instead of the American one, and I would try to talk to people in the Mexican grocery store in Spanish as opposed to going to the American one and speaking English. Shit like that. 


[00:28:47] Whenever... And I lived in.. It wasn't really.. How can I say this? At that time, I was living in San Diego and there's hundreds, thousands, maybe millions of Mexicans and other Latinos in that city. So every time I'm in the street, there's somebody near me that speaks Spanish. So every time I heard somebody speaking Spanish, I would walk over to them and try to start a conversation, stuff like that. I would just try to live my life in Spanish. I would only speak Spanish with my Mexican friends. Then I went to Mexico for six weeks. So I was just trying every way I could to force Spanish into my life. And then I learned how to speak it. That was it. Same thing with Portuguese. 


[00:29:26] So I'm not saying all this, like, "Oh, just live your life in English, just practice more, just talk more.", because it sounds good because it sounds cool or it's, you know, like different from what everybody else is saying. This is just like common sense. And I don't.. I don't say that to like sound arrogant or like I'm looking down at you, like, "How do you not know this?", because I didn't know either. When I learned my first foreign language, I didn't know how to do it. I just did what made sense and kind of figured it out. And it seems like people all around the world, even right now, don't understand the basic concept, which is, language gets learned the same way every single time. So the same way you learn the first one, just learn the second one. You know what I mean? Don't have to overcomplicate the process. Just live your life in English, you see what I did there? Yeah.


[00:30:16] "Do you like camping? And what do you think about IT?"


[00:30:25] Or "What do you think about IT?" I don't know if you're asking me, what do I think about camping or what do I think about IT because IT is capitalized, but anyway, I'll answer the first half of your question. Do I like camping? I've never been camping for real. Like, I've.. I remember when I was in fifth grade, which was.. I was probably, like, ten years old. My school organized, like, this field trip to where all the fifth graders were going to go to camp, but it wasn't really camp. Like, we all got in these buses and they took us out to the woods, but we stayed in, like, cabins on bunk beds, and that's not really camping. That's just like a hotel in the middle of the forest. You feel me? So it wasn't really camping, like for real, for real, where you go out there by yourself with a tent, catch and cook your own food type of shit. I've never done that.


[00:31:18] Would I enjoy it? I think I could, depending on who I was with. Because be honest with you.. And also how long we're going to be out there, like, if it's, you know, three or four days, cool. Let's do it and see what happens. But somebody who's out there for like a month just surviving in the fucking forest, I'm like, "Nah, I'm good. I'm cool" So it depends on what you mean by camping, if you mean literally like pitching a tent and sleeping outside for the next, you know, 14 to 30 days, the answer is no, I don't like how that sounds. You know, I could do it, but it's not like my idea of a good time. You feel me? Like, I like being in nature for sure. I like being in the woods for sure, but for, like, some extended period of time... Nah.


[00:32:11] "Our teacher saying to us that he hates school."


[00:32:14] Yeah, man, fuck school, bro. I didn't say fuck education. I said fuck school because traditional school is, like, so painfully outdated on purpose... On purpose, in my opinion. It's so painfully outdated, the way they do things is fucking stupid. It is not an environment that encourages what I think learning and education is about. It's not an environment that encourages being open-minded, challenging, like, the norm or standards, thinking critically, healthy debate, studying things you're actually interested in, studying shit that you actually need to know to survive after you leave this place. Public school doesn't really focus on or teach any of that shit. And yet they still expect you to be there from 8 a.m. to fucking 3 p.m., at least in the U.S. I don't know how you do it in your country. But when I was in school, every day, for 13 years, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. That's 7 out of 24 hours. Like.. Almost a third of your day, which is.. Means almost a third of your life from Monday to Friday, you're sitting in a fucking classroom, listening to somebody trying to convince you that you need to know what year fucking Abraham Lincoln died. Fuck school.


[00:33:49] All right, another question, "How do I think in English?" 


[00:33:52] There's been a lot of videos and podcast episodes made about this subject. I don't know if I've ever given my opinion. I probably have, because I always say the same shit. It's very simple. I think the way you learn to think in English is by thinking in English. Like... That's it and what I mean.. Let me not be an asshole. What I mean when I say that is I think writing probably is the best way to learn how to think in English. Now, I have made a podcast episode about that. I don't remember what number it is, but if you go to lifeinenglish.net/episodes, it's somewhere in there. You'll find it the title. I think it's called How Writing Can Make You A Better Speaker. And the basic idea that I'm going to condense and give to you right now is that there's very, very little difference between writing and thinking. The only difference is that when you're writing, you have more time to organize your thoughts before you record them. That's it.


[00:34:45] But in order to write something on the paper, you have to think it with your brain first, right? You can't write without thinking about what you're.. I mean, I guess you could, but you couldn't write a sentence, a clear and logical sentence without thinking about it first. So if you're writing in English, you're thinking in English, and the benefit, again, of writing is that you have as much time as you.. As you want or as you need. You can open up a Google document, which is free. You clearly have access to the internet because you're listening to or watching this right now. So it's fucking free. You can open Google Docs pick a subject. "What did I do today?" And start writing about what you did today, which means you're literally thinking about what you did today and you're doing it in English. And then what's going to happen when you start doing that is eventually you're going to get to a word or a phrase or an expression or an idea that you do not know how to express.


[00:35:37] "Fuck, what do I do now?" Then you go to Google Translate. You translate the word or the phrase or the expression, and then you keep going. Or you call up your friend, your language exchange partner, or your teacher if you have one. If you don't have one, you should get one. And you ask them, "How do I say this? How do I say that? Does this sound natural? Is there another way to say that? Is this formal or informal?" That's when you start to do those things, but then you always come back to the writing, which is the same thing as thinking. If you're just doing it every day again, all the solutions that I have to all your problems.. The problem is it takes time. So you just got to be patient and consistent, but that's literally it. So by writing every day training your brain to produce thoughts in English because that's all you're doing is producing thoughts and then writing them down.


[00:36:21] You just.. It's like going to the gym. Every day you're lifting the same weight. As long as you keep eating and going to the gym, drinking water, resting when necessary, you're going to get bigger muscles. It's the same thing with learning how to do everything else. So if you want to learn how to think in English, go to the mental gym and just think every day. Produce thoughts every day. Writing is the easiest way to do that because the piece of paper is not waiting for you to respond or be interesting or be perfect like you think a human being is doing. The piece of paper is just like, "Fucking write, something on me, bro. Take your time. Take as long as you want. I'm not going anywhere. I'm not going to say anything. I'm not going to judge you."


[00:37:01] So if you want to learn how to think in English, learn how to write in English because writing is the same thing as thinking. And there's less pressure. And if you're doing it online, then you have Google Translate. So... And just do that consistently over months or years and you just wake up one day and you realize, like, "Shit, I'm not even trying." You just start producing these thoughts in the foreign language without even trying because you've just been doing it so long. Just like your native language, bro, that's like the same thing, the same thing. With your native language, you just have these thoughts. Sometimes you're not even trying. These thoughts just enter your mind in a language that's familiar to you because you've been producing thoughts in that language for so long. You just do it. You just do it. Like everything else. 


[00:37:54] Like, once you learn how to drive a car after a few years, you just get in the car, turn the key, start the car, and you just go. You don't think, like, "What do I do with this hand? And where did I put this foot?" You don't think like that because you've done it so many times. You've driven a car every single day. It's second nature. So literally any skill that you want to learn. That's how you do it. Just do it every day over a long period of time, obviously trying to get better. Don't practice bad shit or incorrect shit. But that's it, man. That's it. Patience, persistence, repetition, like, that's it.


[00:38:33] You know, I'm a ready, fire, aim type of guy, you know? I don't know if you know about this concept, but like, imagine in the military where everyone has weapons, you got an assault rifle and we're at fucking target practice and the instructor will say, "Ready!" So you get your gun ready. Then he says, "Aim!", which means point your gun at the target you want to hit. And then he says, "Fire!", which is when you squeeze the trigger and you shoot the gun. So, ready, aim, fire. 


[00:38:58] But me, I'm like a ready, fire, aim kind of guy. Like, ready, and then bam, and then we aim, you know. Shoot first, ask questions later. Yeah. I feel like you get more done that way. Make more mistakes, but you learn more as well, right? You don't learn from thinking, you learn from doing. Sometimes you just gotta fucking do it and see what happens. In life in general, but also in English, trying to make this relevant to you. You know, maybe you do have opportunities to practice your English like we were talking about earlier in this actual episode, and you're just too afraid to take advantage of the opportunities. Sometimes you just gotta fucking go for it. Worry about the consequences when they come, you know, cross the bridges when you get to them, not before.


[00:39:51] All right. That's another English idiom for you. A lot of times in English, when we're worried about something that might happen in the future. We get all stressed and anxious, even though it's in the future, it's not real, it doesn't exist yet. It's just this imaginary idea that we believe is going to happen at some point. And a lot of times you can say, "I'm going to cross that bridge when I get to it." What that means is I will worry about that problem when the time is right. Because if the problem isn't affecting my present life, if it's something that hasn't even happened yet, it's only possible that it happens in the future, there's no reason for me to worry about it or do anything about it. Right? 


[00:40:31] So if the bridge is 5 miles down the road, I can't cross it right now, so why am I thinking about the bridge? I'll cross that bridge when I get to it or when I arrive at the bridge, then it's time to think about how we're going to cross this bridge or how we're going to deal with this problem. So I'll cross that bridge when I get to it. If you didn't know now, you know.


[00:40:52] You only have trouble doing something when you're nervous because you're focused on the fact that you're nervous. Like, being nervous is a normal thing, and a lot of times we confuse anxiety with excitement. So sometimes you just might be excited and you think that you're nervous or anxious, but that's beside the point. What I'm trying to say is in those moments, stop focusing on the fact that you're nervous, stop focusing on how you feel and focus on the person in front of you. A lot of times people, like, lock up and get frozen and don't know what to do or what to say because they're so focused on the fact that they're locked up and frozen and they don't know what to do or what to say. That's all they can think about, and they just let that negative feedback loop continue forever.


[00:41:37] But if you notice that you're nervous or you're anxious or whatever it is, there's a bunch of stuff you could do, breathing techniques and mindfulness exercises and all that shit. But it's just having the presence of mind to realize, "Maybe I'm nervous and that's OK. But this is just another person." And by focusing on what that person is doing or thinking or saying or how they're behaving instead of focusing on yourself, you don't have time to be nervous. You don't have time, you don't have the mental capacity to be thinking and focusing on what you're doing and feeling and saying and what they're doing and feeling and saying, you can only do one at a time, so focus on them. All right.


[00:42:15] Yo, it's about to be 5. I've been here for 2 and a half motherfucking hours. It didn't feel like it though, right? I didn't feel 2 and a half hours pass, but I'm about to go, y'all. So what's today? Friday? I don't know when this episode is coming out for those of you that are not here, live with me right now. I mean, just transcribing this fucking thing.. Jesus Christ! We're going to see how that goes. But anyway, I just wanted to come say, what's up, y'all, talk about nothing for a little bit and get on out of here. It was supposed to be a 30-minute episode. It turned out to be 2 and a half hours.


[00:42:51] But some quick updates, man. I got more videos coming on TikTok next week, for sure. Definitely, more podcast episodes coming out. I believe, I don't know, I haven't decided yet, in the next podcast episode, we're going to be talking about Ebonics, Black English, African-American Vernacular English. It's known by many different names, but I think it's time to talk about that. It's just going to take some time to do, like, all the research and prepare the episode and then record it and edit it and all those things. But I think that's what's next on the Life in English podcast. And then after doing a couple of polls and asking a few people some questions, getting back to more English lessons on the YouTube channel as well. So if you follow or listen or watch on YouTube, you might have noticed that recently all I've been posting there is the podcast episodes, but I plan to get back to more lessons about English and just American culture and stuff like that. So a little bit of everything until I figure out what you guys need the most, what you guys like the most, and what's the most fun to make, I guess.


[00:43:50] But that's it, man. I don't know when the next live stream is going to be, probably next Friday, probably. I can't say for sure, but most likely next Friday. I'm gonna try to figure out how to, like, do the.. How to schedule it so that when you come to my profile, you can see when the next one is going to be. I might try to figure that out right now, but if I don't just know that most likely next Friday afternoon, around 1:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, most likely. I gotta keep saying that, most likely, I'll be live again and I'll come and say, what's up to y'all. 


[00:44:27] Now, if you're still with me listening at this point, I just want to say one more time. If you want to send me a message, like, don't be afraid to shoot me a message, bro, I try to respond to all of them. I don't always manage to do that. But if you have a question, you just want to say, "What's up?" You want to recommend that I talk about a certain subject, whatever it is. Don't be afraid to send your boy a message, man, and say, "what's up?" You know? I love y'all, man. I appreciate y'all. Hopefully, you're getting value from the videos and the podcast episodes and all the other stuff that's coming in the future. Hopefully, you enjoyed this episode of this live stream. You know what I'm saying. 


[00:45:01] And I'm gonna see y'all, again, most likely.. Most likely next Friday around. 1:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. But we'll see. All right, but that's it for. I didn't even do the intro, bro. What's up, everybody? You are listening to another episode of Life in English. I'm your host, Tony Kaizen. And the intro is now the outro. So hopefully you enjoyed it and I'm gonna get y'all later. Peace!


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[00:00:00] "How do I know if my English is good?"


[00:00:04] I don't think I've ever been asked that question before. How do I know if my English is good?


[00:00:13] That's a good question. Give me a second, I'm gonna think about that because that's a good question.


[00:00:22] I think there's a few ways you can know if your English is actually good. In no particular order, here they are.


[00:00:30] The first one is if you just find yourself randomly thinking in English just because... I think that's the point where, you know, like, I'm.. My brain is really starting to accept the fact that I speak more than one language, or that this new language is important and therefore it needs to be remembered. You see what I'm saying? When you just randomly find yourself having thoughts in English or saying things in English, or even when somebody in your native language is talking to you in your native language and you just naturally want to respond with an expression or a word in English because it just feels better. That's how I think you know your your your level is increasing or improving.


[00:01:08] The other one is when you don't find yourself making an effort to understand spoken English. That's how you know, like, you're really starting to understand the language, because in the beginning, as a beginner, even an intermediate speaker sometimes, you have to focus on what's being said to understand what's being said. Like, you can't be on the computer typing or reading a blog article and then understand the TV in the foreign language because it's just not as normal for your brain, as your native language. But if your native language is on the TV, you can be reading a book and the words, the audio from the TV are entering your brain and you can still understand every single word that's being said without trying. It's your native language. So when you can do that in the foreign language, that's how you know, "OK, I've reached a pretty high level." Because the sound is just entering my brain and being interpreted and understood without me having to focus on it. It's just background noise, but I still understand every word. When that started happening, for me, that's how I knew I really understand this language, you know? So I think that's a good sign.


[00:02:15] Also, I think when. You don't necessarily feel a difference between the way that you... How can I say that accurately? You know how when you're learning the foreign language, especially in the beginning, you feel like a different person when you're speaking the foreign language because it's a completely different way of expressing yourself. Like, the intonation, the word choice, the grammar, everything is just fucking different. So you don't even have, like, the mental capacity to focus on being yourself and expressing yourself. I don't know if that makes sense. But there comes a point where you reach a good enough level to where you don't have to think about the actual words that you're choosing or the way you're expressing yourself or how it sounds when it comes out of your mouth, you're just talking because you're so comfortable with the language. So when you get to that point, you can just be yourself, you know? 


[00:03:12] Which is interesting to think about, too, because there's an idea that we have different personalities when we speak different languages. And people have told me before, like, "You sound different, you act different when you speak Portuguese or Spanish or English. Your voice changes." and stuff like that. And I never really thought about it. But there might be some truth to that. Let me know if you're watching this live on TikTok, let me know in the comments. Do you feel different? Do you feel like your personality or your voice changes when you speak a foreign language? Because I think when you get to that point where maybe you act different or your mannerisms or your voice changes when you're speaking that foreign language, but you feel like you can be yourself 100 percent because you don't have to think about the language. I think that's when, you know, "I've gotten to a good level where I'm not even thinking about the words I'm saying, I'm just saying them."


[00:04:01] Because that's what you do with your native language, right? Like, you might think before you speak in your native language, but you're thinking about what you want to say or how you want to say it and not the actual individual words, like, "Where does 'the' go in the sentence? Where does the adverb go? Does the grammar.. or does the verb go at the beginning or the end of the sentence in this language?" You're not thinking about shit like that. So I think when you get to that point, it's like, "OK, I'm doing pretty good."


[00:04:32] I think also when you consistently have positive interactions with other people. And I don't mean, like, people just like you or, like, you're a more likable person. But I mean, when you're trying to communicate with somebody, you have an objective to either receive or transmit a message. And when you can consistently receive and transmit messages with multiple people, Without having any, like, major problems, then, you know, "I'm doing good." Because a lot of times in the beginning, like, there's a whole bunch of misunderstandings or you get lost all the time, there's a bunch of words you don't understand that this person is saying or you can't express basic ideas, or you can't talk about a bunch of different subjects, right? And for that reason, you don't have consistently positive experiences trying to express yourself in this language. But when time, after time, after time, it's positive, like, "I said what I wanted to say, I could express myself. I understood, you know, 75, 80, 90 percent of what they said." Doing pretty good.


[00:05:36] Other people say, like, once you start dreaming in the language, then, you know, like, "I've reached this really high level." But I've never had a dream in Spanish or Portuguese. I actually don't have dreams. It's not.. That's not a fair thing to say because I actually don't really have dreams like that. That might sound like a weird thing to say. But I have probably, like, six or seven dreams every year. Like, I'm one of those people that goes to sleep and it's just darkness. From the time I go to sleep to the time I wake up, there's no dream. Like, since I was a kid, like, a really young age. I don't even remember as a kid having a bunch of dreams. I know I had them, but I would say since like 12 or 13 years old, nothing. For sure since, like, 14 or 15. No dreams. I go to sleep and it's just darkness. Nothing. So I don't even have dreams in English, getting back to the point, I don't even have dreams in English. So I'm probably not the best person to say whether or not dreams in a foreign language is an indicator that you've reached a high level because I've reached a high level in Spanish and Portuguese, but I don't dream in those languages.


[00:06:47] The only time I know for sure I'm going to have a dream is if I get drunk before I go to sleep. I don't know why, but I know, like, I've noticed if I drink a lot of alcohol before I go to sleep, I'm gonna have a dream that night and it's going to be some wild, fucking crazy dream. Just... like, all dreams can be random and wild and crazy, but when I drink before I go to sleep, they're just the weirdest, most random dreams. But that's the only time. Every other night, for years now, just darkness.


[00:07:23] "Yes, I also feel like I'm acting when I speak in English."


[00:07:28] Actually, that's a really interesting comment. What's your name? Dominic? Dominic, that's what we're going to call you. That's the first half of your screen name. So, Dominic, that's an interesting comment. You feel like you're acting when you're speaking English. I think.. This is something I've thought about for a long time, but never really formulated my actual idea. But I think some particular people that will have a lot of success learning foreign languages are people that know how to act. And what I mean when I say that is learning a language isn't just about learning new words. That's, like, half the battle. That might not even be half the battle. Because obviously, it's important, but language is so much more than just words and letters. Hopefully, we can agree on that. It's, like, energy. It's emotion being communicated. There's physical gestures that we do based on the language that we speak and the country we grew up in. That's also language, like, it's just one part of communication. 


[00:08:29] But anyway, people that know how to act, I think, do really good because.. And this is just my opinion, I don't know what the fuck I'm talking about. But I think people that are great actors or people that are just hyper-vigilant, they're very observant people, (they) pick up on or notice, like, somebody's mannerisms, their gestures, the way their eyes move when they're speaking, their tone of voice when they say certain things, like, the way they connect their words together and how it's different from somebody of a different region who speaks the same language. People that naturally notice stuff like that, like myself, just naturally are better at sounding like a native when they speak or just understanding natives when they speak, you know? Which is why it's so weird that that's something that's not taught in, like, English schools or most courses. A lot of people don't talk about communication. They just talk about language, which is just a part of communication. Like, language shouldn't be the focus, I think. It's part of it, but language is the tool that you use to complete, like a bigger.. To achieve a bigger objective, right, which is (to) communicate. 


[00:09:34] So, getting back to the acting part, people that know how to act and imitate the voices that they hear or the sounds that they hear, or the mannerisms and gestures and things like that, I think (they) have an unfair advantage over everybody else trying to learn not just how to speak the language, but how to speak it like a native and understand the natives and stuff like that. People who are just naturally interested in culture and history and want to know why people say that thing or why they say it that way, or why that's offensive or why that's funny or whatever it is. People were just naturally interested in those things, I think, do a lot better when trying to learn a language. Because all of that influences how we use the language. Who says certain things and why other people don't. Stuff like that, you know? So I look at it that way. 


[00:10:24] And that's another thing. I think I'm going to make a podcast episode about this in the future is having a language role model. That comment about you feeling like an actor ties directly into this other idea. Which is, anybody, listening right now, I strongly recommend that you find what I like to call a language role model. And what that is.. First of all, a role model.. I don't have the textbook definition, but a role model is somebody that you look up to, so to speak, somebody you admire and you try to emulate. So let's say you're a soccer player, that's a universal idea. Your role model could be Messi, for example. That's your favorite player, you love not just the way he plays, but his character, his style, his vision. Something about him makes you want to play like him, right? You identify with him in some way.


[00:11:12] So a language role model, I think, is the same idea. If you're going to learn a language that's quite diverse, like English, for example, I would say.. I would recommend finding one person or one group of people, one accent, one dialect, one region, and focus solely, completely on that. Like, you don't really need to be focused on, like, the Australian dialect, the American dialect, the British dialect, and try to learn and get exposed to all these things. Like, over time, that's cool. You can do that. But in the beginning, pick somebody that speaks in a way that you really appreciate. It could be the president. It could be your favorite actor, could be an athlete, one of your friends. It really doesn't matter who it is. But you like their voice, you like their accent, you like the way in which they speak and all that type of stuff, their vocabulary or whatever it is. Pick that person and try to copy them specifically. Pay much more attention to the way they express themselves, the words that they choose, the way that they pronounce their words and stuff like that. Because it's probably going to be completely different from somebody that's from the other side of that country or the other side of the world.


[00:12:24] So when you do that, when you have a language role model, now you can focus on one way of speaking and just try to copy that. Because when you're listening to a bunch of different kinds of English, you never really know what you're listening to because you don't have the cultural understanding that a native does. So you might think this one way of speaking is very cool, and you just don't know that if you speak that way in this particular setting, people are going to judge you for it or have a particular impression of you. You don't have that cultural understanding yet. So by picking one person, you can learn how is it that they communicate? Is this person formal or informal? Is this person vulgar or not? Do they use a lot of curse words or they use a lot of slang and stuff like that? And then you can decide, "Do I want to speak like that or not?" If the answer is yes, focus on that person. If the answer is no, go find somebody else who speaks in the way you would like to speak and only listen to people that speak that way so that you're constantly hearing what you want to sound like. And then you start to imitate it and you just practice and naturally, you grow like that. Let me know if that makes sense. I don't even know if that idea makes sense when I explain it. I've never explained that to somebody before.


[00:13:33] "Why do some people use them instead of those? Example, 'wash them dishes'." 


[00:13:39] That's an excellent question. And I say that because I'm actually preparing an episode right now about that specifically. So the reason some people say, "Wash them dishes." instead of, "Wash those dishes." is just a question of culture. It's a different dialect of English, formerly known as 'Ebonics', which is the word I prefer. But it's also known as 'Black English', it's also known as 'African-American vernacular English'. So that's the reason. It's just a different dialect of English. Now, why it's said that way in that dialect, I don't know. I have no idea. But that's the reason some people say, "them dishes," some people say, "those dishes." Some people say, "I don't like them people." Some people say, "I don't like those people." You know? Just a different dialect. So there you go.


[00:14:29] You know something else I wanted to talk about, bro? I'm curious to know your opinion on this is. Um, self-flying drones, I cannot wait. A lot of people are afraid of technological advancements and are afraid of just technology in general and artificial intelligence and robots taking jobs and eventually, like, hurting humanity and shit like that. That's possible. But I can tell you one thing I'm super excited for is self-flying drones. Just like they have self-flying, self-flying cars, self-driving cars. We already got those. I think they have self-flying planes, too, bro. I can't confirm that so don't quote me on that. But I think we got self-flying planes. 


[00:15:10] But anyway, a drone, just in case you don't know, D R O N E, a drone is essentially, like, what would you call it? Like, a mini helicopter, a remote control helicopter/plane? I don't fucking know.


[00:15:26] But anyway, the remote-controlled or the self-flying drones, that's what I was talking about. I have a lot of, like, video ideas and content and things I want to make, but I need a cameraman and I don't have one. So when self-flying drones come around... Imagine that. Because drones typically already come with the camera on the bottom. So imagine a world, and this is going to happen, I really believe this, imagine a world in which people are just walking around with, like, this little drone, probably no bigger than my hand, just flying around above them, hovering around over their heads, recording their daily life or recording whatever they want to record. It's like the ultimate vlogging tool at that point.


[00:16:08] Because a lot of people.. What we have now is just, like, the obnoxious scene of, like, somebody walking with a selfie stick. You guys remember those things? The fucking stick that would extend and you put the phone on the end and you're walking around with, like, just this stick in front of you. When you stop and think about how fucking ridiculous selfie sticks actually are... You look fucking ridiculous holding the stick out in front of you, like "Cheese!", you know? Effective, but they look ridiculous. And then you just have people that decided I'm just going to walk with my arm out in front of me, right? Your arm became the selfie stick. At some point, they're going to create a way where you can just throw the device up into the air and it just floats around you. That's going to happen, wouldn't you agree? Would you agree? I think so.


[00:16:55] And I can't wait, because then you can go record.. Imagine the fucking videos that could be made, the vlogs, the documentaries that could be made if there was a piece of technology that was smart enough, like, you'd probably have to wear some type of chip or something that sends off a signal to let the camera know that it's supposed to record you, right, it's always facing you. But then you could just walk around your daily life and the camera always just knows where to be. You click a button and you can say, "Stay at a 45-degree angle, stay at a 90-degree angle.", or whatever, and it just knows to stay there and record you from that angle. You could press a button or do a hand gesture, and it moves to a different angle. That's going to happen, don't you think? They're probably working on that right now, and I will be one of the first customers, you know? You could make so much more dope stuff if I just had my own personal cameraman. And with a drone, it's, like, it's just always there. You don't got to call them and be like, "Hey, can you record today?", you just charge it and turn it on. 


[00:17:55] I don't know, but you know, where else I think technology is going to be very useful and somebody's going to figure out a way to do this, I think in the near future, is by using artificially intelligent robots to teach language. Because we already have virtual reality, augmented reality, artificially intelligent robots that can have conversations with humans. So imagine a robot that speaks all languages, right. Basically, Google Translate, but, like, in one place, speaks and understands all languages and has, like, an authentic voice. So if you switch it to Mandarin, for example, you'll hear an authentic voice of somebody that speaks Mandarin or English or Russian or Japanese, whatever the language is. It'll have all of them on their preloaded. And you can put on the fucking headphones and the goggles and sit there with a microphone and practice your speaking and listening skills.


[00:18:52] You can, like, change the level of intensity. So, like, basic English, the robot will speak to you in basic English, then intermediate, then advanced, and you can change that kind of like a video game. And then it'll have, like, speaking exercises where it will judge your speech. And tell you, "You need to improve in this area or that area or try saying it this way or saying it that way." 150 percent guaranteed, somebody's going to figure out how to do that to where you don't even need some guy like me to teach you these things. You can just go on there and practice with the fucking robot. Obviously, it won't be the same, but it'll be close enough. It'll be close enough. I think we need a few more years for virtual reality to become, let's say, part of a larger consumer base. Like, more people have to have virtual reality in their homes. It has to be more trendy for there to be a business behind it, but somebody is going to figure that out, right? I would think so.


[00:19:51] Going back to what I was talking about in the beginning, like, 20 minutes ago, which is studying the art of communication and not just language. Because you could speak fucking 10 languages and still not know how to have good conversations. Nobody gives a fuck how many languages you speak, it's how you use them that's really important. And language is just as much, just as much about listening as it is about talking. I think it's more about listening. I think communication is much more about listening, for sure. So give it a try, man. Improve your listening skills and you'll start to hear more interesting things. Ain't that some shit? When you listen more attentively, you could be talking to the same person or hear the same type of thing and find something interesting in what was said that you wouldn't be able to find or notice if you weren't actually paying attention or listening. Like, people communicate deep feelings and emotions or, like, give you hints of very interesting stories all the time in casual conversation, and most people never get to dive into those stories or feelings or thoughts or opinions because they're just not paying attention. They're not listening, you know? I don't know if this is making any sense. Again, this is talking about nothing, I'm just sitting here talking. Somebody let me know if it makes sense.


[00:21:17] Who said that? Zach says, "One thing that's missing is opportunities to practice your English." 


[00:21:25] And I agree with that. The only thing is that it can be very difficult to solve that problem because, for example, I'll use what I'm doing as an example. The Life in English VIP membership. And if you're not familiar with what that is, the Life in English VIP membership is essentially a situation in which you can practice or you have the opportunity to practice all aspects of your language, so if you're a Life English VIP, you can read the vocabulary guides and transcripts of every podcast episode so you're improving your reading skills, your comprehension, your listening skills. You can hear what's being said in the podcast and learn new words and expressions and focus on the grammar and stuff like that. So you're listening and you're reading, and then you can join our private conversation group on Discord, which is a place where you get to speak and listen to other real people. So I tried to create an environment in which you can practice all aspects of the language for a relatively low price with real people.


[00:22:24] Now, the challenge that I've noticed since we launched, maybe a month ago, is that even in situations in which people have opportunities to practice their language skills, they don't take advantage of the opportunities. It's the weirdest thing. It's the weirdest thing. There could be 15 people in a group chat and nobody ever says anything. If somebody sends a message there for somebody to respond, nobody responds. It's the weirdest thing. Even when people like, in our case, people are paying money for the membership to be a part of this community and they don't practice. They have access to me. They could send me a direct message. They could call me on the phone any time and they don't.


[00:23:06] So I agree, what most people don't have is an opportunity to practice their English, but what I think is an even bigger problem is that even when people get the opportunity, they don't take advantage of it for whatever reason. Maybe they don't have time, they're afraid, they're nervous they don't care enough, whatever it is. So yes, I think opportunities to practice are lacking across the world, but I also think that it's two other things. 


[00:23:32] One, the lack of incentivization by the teachers for the students to step outside their comfort zone and start communicating and practicing. You know, and that's.. It's arguable if that's the teacher's responsibility or not. Right? But the second thing is just students making a conscious choice not to practice when they have the opportunity and then complaining about it later. And I'm not saying you, specifically, that made the comment. I'm just saying that's one thing I've noticed. Is that.. You know, you can lead a horse.. Here's an idiom for you in the English idiom, and you probably say this in other languages, you can lead a horse to water, but you cannot make the horse drink. In other words, like, you can teach a student the language, but you can't make them talk. That's probably the equivalent expression or idiom in this case. So I can teach you everything you need to know, but if you're not willing to take the risk and express yourself or be corrected or whatever it is, then it's all meaningless. At the end of the day, it's on you.


[00:24:41] "I understand all the ideas, but I have problems to talk or express my ideas."


[00:24:46] Yeah, this is the problem of most people, man. I hear that, like, on a daily basis where you can understand everything you hear, but you can't respond the way you would like to. And a lot of people don't like to hear this, but it really is just because you're not speaking enough. Just like everything else in life. It literally is like everything else in life, everything else that you have to learn in life. Like, you weren't a master shoe-tier when you were a kid, but eventually, you learned how to tie your shoes and now you don't think about it. It's just second nature. You didn't brush your teeth perfectly the first time, (but) you did it. Then you just do it every day, hopefully, right? Taking a bath or learning how to write, your handwriting at 7 years old (is) probably, hopefully, different from your handwriting at 27 or 37. The words that you choose are different from the words you chose when you were 7 years old. You know, if you've been learning how to play an instrument, you were probably trash in the beginning.. And probably still trash now. No, I'm just kidding. 


[00:25:49] But, it takes time, is the point. Any skill. And learning how to express yourself in any language is a skill. So it takes time. And listening always comes before the speaking because it's something that.. It's input, not output, it's easier to consume than it is to produce, I think. So, I think that's why the listening part comes first, and that gets easier before the speaking does. because when you're speaking, you have to try again and again and again and again and again. It's something that you have to do and make the effort to do. And a lot of people are comfortable, just like sitting back and listening, and they feel good that they can listen. And then it's just this constant cycle where every time they try to express themselves, it's difficult and they feel like shit or they feel like it's just taking too long. Well, it's because you don't do it enough. If you only go to the gym once a month, you're never going to lose those 30 pounds, bro. Good luck. You know, you telling.. "Yeah, I'm going to the gym, I'm in the gym, I'm working out, I'm getting her done!" And they don't know you're in there once every 30 fucking days, bro. And that's, that's most of you. Most of you. "Yeah. I'm learning English, I'm trying hard, watching Netflix every night. 7 O'Clock, baby! My favorite program!" But you're not talking to anybody, ever... Ever. So that's my, that's my recommendation to you and you and anybody else, is just practice more, bro. 


[00:27:17] Like, I do these lives, they're fun. I like teaching. I try to give away the tips, I try to do the podcast and stuff like that, stuff that you can't do on your own. But at the end of the day, like, the talking part, that's what's missing for most people. And it's the one thing that a teacher can't influence or control or improve without somebody who's willing to do it. Like, you, you know, I can teach you it all, but if you're not willing to take the risk and practice and be consistent, then I don't know what to tell you, bro. Just wasting time. You know? 


[00:27:55] "How did you learn to speak both Spanish and English so well?"


[00:28:00] Well, English is my first language, so that's not really fair. I had no choice. Spanish, I wouldn't say I speak it very well, but I learned to speak Spanish doing everything that I tell people to do every fucking day on this TikTok app, on YouTube, on my podcast, I did exactly what I'm telling you to do, which is practice every fucking day. That's it. Like, and everything else that everybody does, bro. Like, I watched novelas every day after class. They were an hour long. I would watch at least one every day. Listening to music and translating the song lyrics. I would go to the Mexican grocery store instead of the American one, and I would try to talk to people in the Mexican grocery store in Spanish as opposed to going to the American one and speaking English. Shit like that. 


[00:28:47] Whenever... And I lived in.. It wasn't really.. How can I say this? At that time, I was living in San Diego and there's hundreds, thousands, maybe millions of Mexicans and other Latinos in that city. So every time I'm in the street, there's somebody near me that speaks Spanish. So every time I heard somebody speaking Spanish, I would walk over to them and try to start a conversation, stuff like that. I would just try to live my life in Spanish. I would only speak Spanish with my Mexican friends. Then I went to Mexico for six weeks. So I was just trying every way I could to force Spanish into my life. And then I learned how to speak it. That was it. Same thing with Portuguese. 


[00:29:26] So I'm not saying all this, like, "Oh, just live your life in English, just practice more, just talk more.", because it sounds good because it sounds cool or it's, you know, like different from what everybody else is saying. This is just like common sense. And I don't.. I don't say that to like sound arrogant or like I'm looking down at you, like, "How do you not know this?", because I didn't know either. When I learned my first foreign language, I didn't know how to do it. I just did what made sense and kind of figured it out. And it seems like people all around the world, even right now, don't understand the basic concept, which is, language gets learned the same way every single time. So the same way you learn the first one, just learn the second one. You know what I mean? Don't have to overcomplicate the process. Just live your life in English, you see what I did there? Yeah.


[00:30:16] "Do you like camping? And what do you think about IT?"


[00:30:25] Or "What do you think about IT?" I don't know if you're asking me, what do I think about camping or what do I think about IT because IT is capitalized, but anyway, I'll answer the first half of your question. Do I like camping? I've never been camping for real. Like, I've.. I remember when I was in fifth grade, which was.. I was probably, like, ten years old. My school organized, like, this field trip to where all the fifth graders were going to go to camp, but it wasn't really camp. Like, we all got in these buses and they took us out to the woods, but we stayed in, like, cabins on bunk beds, and that's not really camping. That's just like a hotel in the middle of the forest. You feel me? So it wasn't really camping, like for real, for real, where you go out there by yourself with a tent, catch and cook your own food type of shit. I've never done that.


[00:31:18] Would I enjoy it? I think I could, depending on who I was with. Because be honest with you.. And also how long we're going to be out there, like, if it's, you know, three or four days, cool. Let's do it and see what happens. But somebody who's out there for like a month just surviving in the fucking forest, I'm like, "Nah, I'm good. I'm cool" So it depends on what you mean by camping, if you mean literally like pitching a tent and sleeping outside for the next, you know, 14 to 30 days, the answer is no, I don't like how that sounds. You know, I could do it, but it's not like my idea of a good time. You feel me? Like, I like being in nature for sure. I like being in the woods for sure, but for, like, some extended period of time... Nah.


[00:32:11] "Our teacher saying to us that he hates school."


[00:32:14] Yeah, man, fuck school, bro. I didn't say fuck education. I said fuck school because traditional school is, like, so painfully outdated on purpose... On purpose, in my opinion. It's so painfully outdated, the way they do things is fucking stupid. It is not an environment that encourages what I think learning and education is about. It's not an environment that encourages being open-minded, challenging, like, the norm or standards, thinking critically, healthy debate, studying things you're actually interested in, studying shit that you actually need to know to survive after you leave this place. Public school doesn't really focus on or teach any of that shit. And yet they still expect you to be there from 8 a.m. to fucking 3 p.m., at least in the U.S. I don't know how you do it in your country. But when I was in school, every day, for 13 years, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. That's 7 out of 24 hours. Like.. Almost a third of your day, which is.. Means almost a third of your life from Monday to Friday, you're sitting in a fucking classroom, listening to somebody trying to convince you that you need to know what year fucking Abraham Lincoln died. Fuck school.


[00:33:49] All right, another question, "How do I think in English?" 


[00:33:52] There's been a lot of videos and podcast episodes made about this subject. I don't know if I've ever given my opinion. I probably have, because I always say the same shit. It's very simple. I think the way you learn to think in English is by thinking in English. Like... That's it and what I mean.. Let me not be an asshole. What I mean when I say that is I think writing probably is the best way to learn how to think in English. Now, I have made a podcast episode about that. I don't remember what number it is, but if you go to lifeinenglish.net/episodes, it's somewhere in there. You'll find it the title. I think it's called How Writing Can Make You A Better Speaker. And the basic idea that I'm going to condense and give to you right now is that there's very, very little difference between writing and thinking. The only difference is that when you're writing, you have more time to organize your thoughts before you record them. That's it.


[00:34:45] But in order to write something on the paper, you have to think it with your brain first, right? You can't write without thinking about what you're.. I mean, I guess you could, but you couldn't write a sentence, a clear and logical sentence without thinking about it first. So if you're writing in English, you're thinking in English, and the benefit, again, of writing is that you have as much time as you.. As you want or as you need. You can open up a Google document, which is free. You clearly have access to the internet because you're listening to or watching this right now. So it's fucking free. You can open Google Docs pick a subject. "What did I do today?" And start writing about what you did today, which means you're literally thinking about what you did today and you're doing it in English. And then what's going to happen when you start doing that is eventually you're going to get to a word or a phrase or an expression or an idea that you do not know how to express.


[00:35:37] "Fuck, what do I do now?" Then you go to Google Translate. You translate the word or the phrase or the expression, and then you keep going. Or you call up your friend, your language exchange partner, or your teacher if you have one. If you don't have one, you should get one. And you ask them, "How do I say this? How do I say that? Does this sound natural? Is there another way to say that? Is this formal or informal?" That's when you start to do those things, but then you always come back to the writing, which is the same thing as thinking. If you're just doing it every day again, all the solutions that I have to all your problems.. The problem is it takes time. So you just got to be patient and consistent, but that's literally it. So by writing every day training your brain to produce thoughts in English because that's all you're doing is producing thoughts and then writing them down.


[00:36:21] You just.. It's like going to the gym. Every day you're lifting the same weight. As long as you keep eating and going to the gym, drinking water, resting when necessary, you're going to get bigger muscles. It's the same thing with learning how to do everything else. So if you want to learn how to think in English, go to the mental gym and just think every day. Produce thoughts every day. Writing is the easiest way to do that because the piece of paper is not waiting for you to respond or be interesting or be perfect like you think a human being is doing. The piece of paper is just like, "Fucking write, something on me, bro. Take your time. Take as long as you want. I'm not going anywhere. I'm not going to say anything. I'm not going to judge you."


[00:37:01] So if you want to learn how to think in English, learn how to write in English because writing is the same thing as thinking. And there's less pressure. And if you're doing it online, then you have Google Translate. So... And just do that consistently over months or years and you just wake up one day and you realize, like, "Shit, I'm not even trying." You just start producing these thoughts in the foreign language without even trying because you've just been doing it so long. Just like your native language, bro, that's like the same thing, the same thing. With your native language, you just have these thoughts. Sometimes you're not even trying. These thoughts just enter your mind in a language that's familiar to you because you've been producing thoughts in that language for so long. You just do it. You just do it. Like everything else. 


[00:37:54] Like, once you learn how to drive a car after a few years, you just get in the car, turn the key, start the car, and you just go. You don't think, like, "What do I do with this hand? And where did I put this foot?" You don't think like that because you've done it so many times. You've driven a car every single day. It's second nature. So literally any skill that you want to learn. That's how you do it. Just do it every day over a long period of time, obviously trying to get better. Don't practice bad shit or incorrect shit. But that's it, man. That's it. Patience, persistence, repetition, like, that's it.


[00:38:33] You know, I'm a ready, fire, aim type of guy, you know? I don't know if you know about this concept, but like, imagine in the military where everyone has weapons, you got an assault rifle and we're at fucking target practice and the instructor will say, "Ready!" So you get your gun ready. Then he says, "Aim!", which means point your gun at the target you want to hit. And then he says, "Fire!", which is when you squeeze the trigger and you shoot the gun. So, ready, aim, fire. 


[00:38:58] But me, I'm like a ready, fire, aim kind of guy. Like, ready, and then bam, and then we aim, you know. Shoot first, ask questions later. Yeah. I feel like you get more done that way. Make more mistakes, but you learn more as well, right? You don't learn from thinking, you learn from doing. Sometimes you just gotta fucking do it and see what happens. In life in general, but also in English, trying to make this relevant to you. You know, maybe you do have opportunities to practice your English like we were talking about earlier in this actual episode, and you're just too afraid to take advantage of the opportunities. Sometimes you just gotta fucking go for it. Worry about the consequences when they come, you know, cross the bridges when you get to them, not before.


[00:39:51] All right. That's another English idiom for you. A lot of times in English, when we're worried about something that might happen in the future. We get all stressed and anxious, even though it's in the future, it's not real, it doesn't exist yet. It's just this imaginary idea that we believe is going to happen at some point. And a lot of times you can say, "I'm going to cross that bridge when I get to it." What that means is I will worry about that problem when the time is right. Because if the problem isn't affecting my present life, if it's something that hasn't even happened yet, it's only possible that it happens in the future, there's no reason for me to worry about it or do anything about it. Right? 


[00:40:31] So if the bridge is 5 miles down the road, I can't cross it right now, so why am I thinking about the bridge? I'll cross that bridge when I get to it or when I arrive at the bridge, then it's time to think about how we're going to cross this bridge or how we're going to deal with this problem. So I'll cross that bridge when I get to it. If you didn't know now, you know.


[00:40:52] You only have trouble doing something when you're nervous because you're focused on the fact that you're nervous. Like, being nervous is a normal thing, and a lot of times we confuse anxiety with excitement. So sometimes you just might be excited and you think that you're nervous or anxious, but that's beside the point. What I'm trying to say is in those moments, stop focusing on the fact that you're nervous, stop focusing on how you feel and focus on the person in front of you. A lot of times people, like, lock up and get frozen and don't know what to do or what to say because they're so focused on the fact that they're locked up and frozen and they don't know what to do or what to say. That's all they can think about, and they just let that negative feedback loop continue forever.


[00:41:37] But if you notice that you're nervous or you're anxious or whatever it is, there's a bunch of stuff you could do, breathing techniques and mindfulness exercises and all that shit. But it's just having the presence of mind to realize, "Maybe I'm nervous and that's OK. But this is just another person." And by focusing on what that person is doing or thinking or saying or how they're behaving instead of focusing on yourself, you don't have time to be nervous. You don't have time, you don't have the mental capacity to be thinking and focusing on what you're doing and feeling and saying and what they're doing and feeling and saying, you can only do one at a time, so focus on them. All right.


[00:42:15] Yo, it's about to be 5. I've been here for 2 and a half motherfucking hours. It didn't feel like it though, right? I didn't feel 2 and a half hours pass, but I'm about to go, y'all. So what's today? Friday? I don't know when this episode is coming out for those of you that are not here, live with me right now. I mean, just transcribing this fucking thing.. Jesus Christ! We're going to see how that goes. But anyway, I just wanted to come say, what's up, y'all, talk about nothing for a little bit and get on out of here. It was supposed to be a 30-minute episode. It turned out to be 2 and a half hours.


[00:42:51] But some quick updates, man. I got more videos coming on TikTok next week, for sure. Definitely, more podcast episodes coming out. I believe, I don't know, I haven't decided yet, in the next podcast episode, we're going to be talking about Ebonics, Black English, African-American Vernacular English. It's known by many different names, but I think it's time to talk about that. It's just going to take some time to do, like, all the research and prepare the episode and then record it and edit it and all those things. But I think that's what's next on the Life in English podcast. And then after doing a couple of polls and asking a few people some questions, getting back to more English lessons on the YouTube channel as well. So if you follow or listen or watch on YouTube, you might have noticed that recently all I've been posting there is the podcast episodes, but I plan to get back to more lessons about English and just American culture and stuff like that. So a little bit of everything until I figure out what you guys need the most, what you guys like the most, and what's the most fun to make, I guess.


[00:43:50] But that's it, man. I don't know when the next live stream is going to be, probably next Friday, probably. I can't say for sure, but most likely next Friday. I'm gonna try to figure out how to, like, do the.. How to schedule it so that when you come to my profile, you can see when the next one is going to be. I might try to figure that out right now, but if I don't just know that most likely next Friday afternoon, around 1:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, most likely. I gotta keep saying that, most likely, I'll be live again and I'll come and say, what's up to y'all. 


[00:44:27] Now, if you're still with me listening at this point, I just want to say one more time. If you want to send me a message, like, don't be afraid to shoot me a message, bro, I try to respond to all of them. I don't always manage to do that. But if you have a question, you just want to say, "What's up?" You want to recommend that I talk about a certain subject, whatever it is. Don't be afraid to send your boy a message, man, and say, "what's up?" You know? I love y'all, man. I appreciate y'all. Hopefully, you're getting value from the videos and the podcast episodes and all the other stuff that's coming in the future. Hopefully, you enjoyed this episode of this live stream. You know what I'm saying. 


[00:45:01] And I'm gonna see y'all, again, most likely.. Most likely next Friday around. 1:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. But we'll see. All right, but that's it for. I didn't even do the intro, bro. What's up, everybody? You are listening to another episode of Life in English. I'm your host, Tony Kaizen. And the intro is now the outro. So hopefully you enjoyed it and I'm gonna get y'all later. Peace!


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