CK #27 - You Don't Have to Get on the Train

December 30, 2021

Remember this simple fact if you want to experience more peace in life.

What’s a Rich Text element?

The rich text element allows you to create and format headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, images, and video all in one place instead of having to add and format them individually. Just double-click and easily create content.

Static and dynamic content editing

A rich text element can be used with static or dynamic content. For static content, just drop it into any page and begin editing. For dynamic content, add a rich text field to any collection and then connect a rich text element to that field in the settings panel. Voila!

How to customize formatting for each rich text

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

Animated subtitles will appear when you press 'play'
You must be a community member to see the complete animated transcript.
Already a member? Log in
Key Vocabulary & Grammar Guide
Download the VIP
Key Vocabulary Guide

Transcript

[00:00:00] What's up, my friend? This is coffee with Kaizen number 27. And if you're listening to this episode, that means you've become a VIP member of the Life in English community. So first of all, I want to thank you for joining the community because, without you, this podcast would not be possible. So I greatly appreciate your support.

[00:00:17] But now let me tell you about today's episode. We're going to take a trip across the pond to the U.K and listen to a short audio clip about mental health. Now, as always, I'm going to play the clip, then explain what was said and leave you with something to think about. All right, so let's not waste any more time, and let's get started. I'm going to play the clip now.[00:00:41] Sometimes we get to the train station, which is your brain, and a thought or a train comes through and you jump on it and you don't care where it's going. Take it all the way. You don't get off. You got all the way to Aberystwyth, and you sit in Aberystwyth and went, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh".

[00:00:55] You can't stop the train's coming. The thoughts are going to come. You know, "Am I going to cope with my exams? How am I going to be able to... (inaudible)? They're all come, but you don't have to jump on them each time. Thoughts are really powerful, but they're only as powerful as we let them be.

[00:01:11] All right, y'all, don't feel bad or concerned if you could not understand everything this man was saying. You know, it's an accent that's very different from mine, right? He's from somewhere in the UK, I'm not sure exactly where. And he was speaking quite fast. He wasn't enunciating as much as I do, for example. So don't feel bad if it was difficult to understand, especially, you know, just hearing it for the first time and all that type of stuff.

[00:01:35] So what I'm going to do now is just explain some of the words and phrases that he used during that clip that I think maybe could be confusing or hard to understand if you're hearing them for the first time. And I'll try to play some pieces of the clip again so you can hear those words and expressions again. Then I'll play the whole clip one more time. Then I'll leave you with something to think about and we'll get out of here. So let's start with the explanations.

[00:01:59] The first thing I wanted to explain was "to get to the train station". And the point I want to talk about is "get to", to get to the train station is just another way of saying arrive at the train station. Here in the U.S, I think it's more common, maybe more natural to say "get to the train station". Right? I just got to the airport. Or what time are we going to get to the train station? What time are you going to get home? In that context what we're saying is arrive. Alright?

[00:02:27] So the next thing I wanted to explain was "comes through" because he said, "a train comes through and you just jump on it". So in this case, to come through, the best way I can explain this is "to pass internally from one side to the other". And in this case, it would be the train station. So the train enters the station on one side and it passes all the way to the other side of the train station and leaves. So it goes through or passes through or comes through that station. All right?

[00:02:56] It would be much easier, I think, to show you visually, but hopefully, just me explaining it verbally you could get the idea. All right? So the next phrase is "jump on it" because the train comes through and you just jump on it. Now "to jump on" is an expression that means to get on it. All right? And this is a completely different way of using the word 'get' because at first, I said "get to the train station", which means arrive at the train station. But in this case, to get on the train means to board the train, right? To enter the train.

[00:03:27] So, when I say "just jump on the train", it's an informal way of saying to get on the train, and it's often used when we're speaking about public transportation. Like, I wouldn't say "jump on the car". You see what I'm saying? I could jump on a motorcycle. I could jump on the train. I could jump on a plane. I could jump on the bus, jump on a boat, or something like that. And it just, it's an informal way of saying to get on this mode of transportation. Okay?

[00:03:53] Now, the next thing I wanted to explain is "take it all the way" because you just jump on the train and you take it all the way. Which just means to stay on it until the end of the trip or the end of the journey. So, if this train goes from Los Angeles to San Francisco, I can take the train all the way to San Francisco. Right? I can take it from the very beginning of its, let's say, its journey or whatever to the completion all the way to the end.

[00:04:21] It's kind of hard to explain why we say "all the way", but we're just saying the whole way, the whole trip, the whole distance, the whole journey. We're not going to stop somewhere in the middle. We're not going to get off early. We're taking it all the way to the end. I hope that makes sense.

[00:04:38] So the next thing I wanted to explain is "you don't get off". Right? Because we talked about jumping on the train and the opposite would be hop off or jump off or get off. So, get on the train and get off the train. To board and unboard. Is it unboard or deboard? But I think it's unboard. Yeah, it's unboarding. Right? To unboard the plane means to get off the plane. Anyway, I don't want to confuse you. Let's get back to these explanations.

[00:05:05] So, The next one is "you don't get off". No, that's not next. I just explain that one. The next one is "and went". So let me go back to the actual line where he said that. One second. All right, here we go. I'm going to play it so we can be on the same page and you can know exactly what I'm talking about. Here we go.

[00:05:29] You go all the way to Aberystwyth, and you sit in Aberystwyth and went, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh."

[00:05:34] I don't know if you caught it, but he said "you go all the way to Aberystwyth". I can't pronounce the name of that city. So you go all the way to this place and then you sit in this place and went, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh". So this is kind of difficult to explain because the words that we're focusing on is "and went". So you go all the way to this place, you sit in this place and then you say or and then you go. I'm trying to think of a good way to explain this, because he's saying "and went, I wanted to go to Edinburgh".

[00:06:08] So let me, let me give you a different example to try to show you what I mean. So you know how when we're telling a story and we're talking about something that someone else said, normally what we would say is he said, blah blah blah or and then she said, blah blah blah. Or you said, blah blah blah. You see what I'm saying? That's how we express what somebody else has said, or that's how we quote people when telling stories, right?

[00:06:35] So you go all the way to this place and you sit in this place and then you say, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh". That's really the idea he's trying to express. He just didn't say it that way. You go all the way to this place and then you sit in this place and then you go, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh".

[00:06:51] So there's a couple of different ways of quoting people when telling a story. The most common, I think, is and then you say or said, and then he says or said, and then she said or said. But a very informal but also very common way to do the same thing is to say, and then you go or and then you went, depending on if you're referring to the present or the past. So let me use the same examples.

[00:07:17] So you go all the way to this place and then you sit in this place and you go, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh", which is a different city. Or you go all the way to this place and you sit in this place and then you went, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh". Now, I'm not sure if this explanation is making sense, but you have three options. So you go to this place, you sit in this place and then you say, "I wanted to go to a different place". It's option number one

[00:07:43] Number two, you go all the way to this place and you sit in this place and then you go, "I wanted to go to a different place". So the option number two, when I say "then you go". It's a very informal way of saying "then you say". I don't know why we say that, but if somebody is telling a story and they're quoting somebody else, if they're referring to what somebody else said or is saying they'll use the verb 'go' instead of 'say'.

[00:08:10] Another way now that I think about it, another way to express the same thing that you will hear a lot is using the word like. For example, she went all the way to the store and was like, "I wanted to go to a different store". So when I use those words "was like", really what I'm saying is, "she said". And if you pay attention to people having conversations, telling stories to each other, you're going to notice this

[00:08:35] So I'm talking to my friend and I'll say, "Man, she was like, get out of my face" and I was like, "I'm not going anywhere". And she was like, "I'm going to call the cops". And I was like, "Go ahead and call them". See what I'm saying? So what I'm saying, I was like, or she was like, really what I'm saying is I said, or she said.

[00:08:53] I really hope I'm not confusing you because now we've gotten pretty far from the actual episode. But it's something important that, you know, it just came to my mind just now. It's something that we do and say all the time, you know. So I think I'm going to make another episode kind of just explaining that in more detail, just so I can stay on topic and on track in this episode.

[00:09:14] But if you're listening to this right now, send me a message on the Discord chat or something like that. Let me know if this explanation is making any sense because I feel like I just took five minutes trying to explain it. And I don't even know if it made sense. So let's get back on track.

[00:09:29] So we just talked about "and went". The next phrase that I wanted to explain was "cope with", C O P E W I T H. To cope with something just means to overcome something. I mean, emotionally or, you know, psychologically to overcome something. So you might be coping with the loss of your grandmother, you might be coping with the fact that you failed your entrance exam or something like that. These are very emotionally difficult things to deal with, right? So to cope with them means to overcome those emotional difficulties and move forward. That's basically the idea.

[00:10:08] Now, the last phrase I wanted to explain was "as powerful as" because he said, "thoughts are only as powerful as we let them be". So in a case where you see the word as and then an adjective and then the word as again, as powerful as or as strong as, as intelligent as. You see what I'm saying? This is a way of comparing two things and what we're saying is, you know, equal to. So, for example, thoughts are as powerful as we let them be.

[00:10:37] So when I say thoughts are only as powerful as we let them be, I'm saying thoughts only have the amount of power that we give them. You see what I'm saying? Thoughts have no more power than the amount of power that we give them. So the amount of power that thoughts have is equal to the amount of power that we give them because thoughts are only as powerful as we let them be.

[00:11:01] So you can see we're comparing the power that thoughts have to the power that we give them. And we do that by saying they're only as powerful as the power that we give them, or only as powerful as we let them be, no more. Okay? No more powerful than that. Hopefully that makes sense.

[00:11:20] And I definitely plan on focusing on it and explaining these type of phrases, you know, that go in the middle of sentences and express or form more complex sentences, you know, and express more specific detailed ideas. I'm trying to find a good way to do that. All right.

[00:11:39] But anyway, anyway, this episode has fallen off the rails. It was only like eight or nine explanations, but it took like eight or nine minutes, bro. Shit is crazy. So let me play the clip one more time and then just give you something to think about and we'll get out of here. All right? Let's do it.

[00:12:01] Sometimes we get to the train station, which is your brain, and a thought or a train comes through and you jump on it and you don't care where it's going. Take it all the way. You don't get off. You got all the way to Aberystwyth, and you sit in Aberystwyth and went, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh".

[00:12:15] You can't stop the train's coming. The thoughts are going to come. You know, "Am I going to cope with my exams? How am I going to be able to... (inaudible)? They're all come, but you don't have to jump on them each time. Thoughts are really powerful, but they're only as powerful as we let them be.

[00:12:32] All right! Now, I'm sure I'm not the only one who can relate to this. I don't know if it's because I'm a relatively creative person or if it's anxiety-related or if it's something completely different all together. But there are times when it feels like I'm having a thousand thoughts a minute. Thought after thought, after thought. And to make things worse, I entertain each and every one of those thoughts that pops into my head.

[00:12:56] This random idea pops into my head, it catches my attention and then I pursue it. Before I know it, I'm out in the middle of nowhere with this useless thought that I decided to pursue. I'm so far away from where I started that I can't even remember what I was thinking about or doing before I started chasing this random thought. And then another thought pops into my head and I'm going again.

[00:13:17] Now, overthinking could be considered something like a sickness, don't you think? I mean, sickness in the sense that it never feels good mentally or physically to overthink, at least to me, it's not a pleasant experience. It's not something I wish would happen more. You know what I'm saying? It's something that only causes exhaustion, anxiety, and frustration.

[00:13:39] I think that's why many meditation practitioners speak about the act of calming your mind down and reducing the number of thoughts and ideas you entertain. When your mind is the one that's in control, it will put you in a car and take you wherever it wants to go and you're paying for the gas. You feel me? What I mean is that you're the one that's spending the mental and sometimes physical energy to entertain and focus on these thoughts. Now, a few months ago, a friend of mine told me something that I'll probably never forget.

[00:14:07] He said, "you spend the same amount of energy thinking about something as you spend actually doing something". In other words, you spend the same amount of energy imagining a disaster as you spend actually experiencing the disaster. And it's so true, man. Your body can be in perfect condition, and at the same time, your mind can be completely exhausted. Thinking requires like, real energy. And as humans, we have a finite amount of energy to work with each day.

[00:14:39] I've noticed in my own life that making a conscious effort to stop entertaining thoughts that don't serve me at the moment was one of the best decisions I've ever made. I used to overthink and analyze all kinds of things that had nothing to do with whatever I was doing in the present moment. Not even knowing that I was robbing myself of peace, focus, and precious mental energy.

[00:15:01] I've talked quite a bit about self-awareness in previous episodes, and I'd like to speak about it again because it really is the key to so many things in life. In this case, self-awareness is the key to overcoming the annoying habit of overthinking. It's the key to gaining control of your mind and realizing that the one and only person that can entertain the thoughts that pass through your mind is you.

[00:15:23] Now, as my man said in the clip, you can't stop the thoughts from coming, but you can always choose how you react to them. You can always choose whether or not to give it your attention. And life really becomes much more simple and enjoyable when you limit the amount of things that get your attention. I wouldn't consider myself a minimalist, but I would say that the minimalist approach is very effective in many aspects of our lives. Less is often more.
[00:15:54] So if you can just reach a level of self-awareness that allows you to stop and say, "that thought doesn't need my attention right now", or "that's bullshit" or even better, say nothing at all. Then I think you'll experience a different level of internal peace. Now this, of course, takes a lot of time and discipline to achieve. You have to be incredibly self-aware and have a good amount of self-knowledge as well. It's hard to recognize which thoughts are useless or bad habits or relevant or important if you haven't been paying attention to yourself and learning about yourself up until this point.

[00:16:31] So it's definitely a difficult process, but it's definitely worth it. So just remember, the thoughts are going to come, there's no stopping them. But you always have control over how you react, not just to your thoughts, but also your emotions, your urges, and your impulses.
[00:16:49] So I sincerely hope this gave you something to think about, I hope you enjoyed the episode. I hope you learned some things. But that's it for now, man. So I'm going to get out of here. This is Coffee with Kaizen number 27 in the books. And I will talk to you soon. Peace!

[END OF EPISODE]

Continue learning

Become a member and get access to the complete transcript, vocabulary guide, and writing prompts.

Become a member

Already a member? Log in

[00:00:00] What's up, my friend? This is coffee with Kaizen number 27. And if you're listening to this episode, that means you've become a VIP member of the Life in English community. So first of all, I want to thank you for joining the community because, without you, this podcast would not be possible. So I greatly appreciate your support.

[00:00:17] But now let me tell you about today's episode. We're going to take a trip across the pond to the U.K and listen to a short audio clip about mental health. Now, as always, I'm going to play the clip, then explain what was said and leave you with something to think about. All right, so let's not waste any more time, and let's get started. I'm going to play the clip now.[00:00:41] Sometimes we get to the train station, which is your brain, and a thought or a train comes through and you jump on it and you don't care where it's going. Take it all the way. You don't get off. You got all the way to Aberystwyth, and you sit in Aberystwyth and went, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh".

[00:00:55] You can't stop the train's coming. The thoughts are going to come. You know, "Am I going to cope with my exams? How am I going to be able to... (inaudible)? They're all come, but you don't have to jump on them each time. Thoughts are really powerful, but they're only as powerful as we let them be.

[00:01:11] All right, y'all, don't feel bad or concerned if you could not understand everything this man was saying. You know, it's an accent that's very different from mine, right? He's from somewhere in the UK, I'm not sure exactly where. And he was speaking quite fast. He wasn't enunciating as much as I do, for example. So don't feel bad if it was difficult to understand, especially, you know, just hearing it for the first time and all that type of stuff.

[00:01:35] So what I'm going to do now is just explain some of the words and phrases that he used during that clip that I think maybe could be confusing or hard to understand if you're hearing them for the first time. And I'll try to play some pieces of the clip again so you can hear those words and expressions again. Then I'll play the whole clip one more time. Then I'll leave you with something to think about and we'll get out of here. So let's start with the explanations.

[00:01:59] The first thing I wanted to explain was "to get to the train station". And the point I want to talk about is "get to", to get to the train station is just another way of saying arrive at the train station. Here in the U.S, I think it's more common, maybe more natural to say "get to the train station". Right? I just got to the airport. Or what time are we going to get to the train station? What time are you going to get home? In that context what we're saying is arrive. Alright?

[00:02:27] So the next thing I wanted to explain was "comes through" because he said, "a train comes through and you just jump on it". So in this case, to come through, the best way I can explain this is "to pass internally from one side to the other". And in this case, it would be the train station. So the train enters the station on one side and it passes all the way to the other side of the train station and leaves. So it goes through or passes through or comes through that station. All right?

[00:02:56] It would be much easier, I think, to show you visually, but hopefully, just me explaining it verbally you could get the idea. All right? So the next phrase is "jump on it" because the train comes through and you just jump on it. Now "to jump on" is an expression that means to get on it. All right? And this is a completely different way of using the word 'get' because at first, I said "get to the train station", which means arrive at the train station. But in this case, to get on the train means to board the train, right? To enter the train.

[00:03:27] So, when I say "just jump on the train", it's an informal way of saying to get on the train, and it's often used when we're speaking about public transportation. Like, I wouldn't say "jump on the car". You see what I'm saying? I could jump on a motorcycle. I could jump on the train. I could jump on a plane. I could jump on the bus, jump on a boat, or something like that. And it just, it's an informal way of saying to get on this mode of transportation. Okay?

[00:03:53] Now, the next thing I wanted to explain is "take it all the way" because you just jump on the train and you take it all the way. Which just means to stay on it until the end of the trip or the end of the journey. So, if this train goes from Los Angeles to San Francisco, I can take the train all the way to San Francisco. Right? I can take it from the very beginning of its, let's say, its journey or whatever to the completion all the way to the end.

[00:04:21] It's kind of hard to explain why we say "all the way", but we're just saying the whole way, the whole trip, the whole distance, the whole journey. We're not going to stop somewhere in the middle. We're not going to get off early. We're taking it all the way to the end. I hope that makes sense.

[00:04:38] So the next thing I wanted to explain is "you don't get off". Right? Because we talked about jumping on the train and the opposite would be hop off or jump off or get off. So, get on the train and get off the train. To board and unboard. Is it unboard or deboard? But I think it's unboard. Yeah, it's unboarding. Right? To unboard the plane means to get off the plane. Anyway, I don't want to confuse you. Let's get back to these explanations.

[00:05:05] So, The next one is "you don't get off". No, that's not next. I just explain that one. The next one is "and went". So let me go back to the actual line where he said that. One second. All right, here we go. I'm going to play it so we can be on the same page and you can know exactly what I'm talking about. Here we go.

[00:05:29] You go all the way to Aberystwyth, and you sit in Aberystwyth and went, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh."

[00:05:34] I don't know if you caught it, but he said "you go all the way to Aberystwyth". I can't pronounce the name of that city. So you go all the way to this place and then you sit in this place and went, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh". So this is kind of difficult to explain because the words that we're focusing on is "and went". So you go all the way to this place, you sit in this place and then you say or and then you go. I'm trying to think of a good way to explain this, because he's saying "and went, I wanted to go to Edinburgh".

[00:06:08] So let me, let me give you a different example to try to show you what I mean. So you know how when we're telling a story and we're talking about something that someone else said, normally what we would say is he said, blah blah blah or and then she said, blah blah blah. Or you said, blah blah blah. You see what I'm saying? That's how we express what somebody else has said, or that's how we quote people when telling stories, right?

[00:06:35] So you go all the way to this place and you sit in this place and then you say, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh". That's really the idea he's trying to express. He just didn't say it that way. You go all the way to this place and then you sit in this place and then you go, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh".

[00:06:51] So there's a couple of different ways of quoting people when telling a story. The most common, I think, is and then you say or said, and then he says or said, and then she said or said. But a very informal but also very common way to do the same thing is to say, and then you go or and then you went, depending on if you're referring to the present or the past. So let me use the same examples.

[00:07:17] So you go all the way to this place and then you sit in this place and you go, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh", which is a different city. Or you go all the way to this place and you sit in this place and then you went, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh". Now, I'm not sure if this explanation is making sense, but you have three options. So you go to this place, you sit in this place and then you say, "I wanted to go to a different place". It's option number one

[00:07:43] Number two, you go all the way to this place and you sit in this place and then you go, "I wanted to go to a different place". So the option number two, when I say "then you go". It's a very informal way of saying "then you say". I don't know why we say that, but if somebody is telling a story and they're quoting somebody else, if they're referring to what somebody else said or is saying they'll use the verb 'go' instead of 'say'.

[00:08:10] Another way now that I think about it, another way to express the same thing that you will hear a lot is using the word like. For example, she went all the way to the store and was like, "I wanted to go to a different store". So when I use those words "was like", really what I'm saying is, "she said". And if you pay attention to people having conversations, telling stories to each other, you're going to notice this

[00:08:35] So I'm talking to my friend and I'll say, "Man, she was like, get out of my face" and I was like, "I'm not going anywhere". And she was like, "I'm going to call the cops". And I was like, "Go ahead and call them". See what I'm saying? So what I'm saying, I was like, or she was like, really what I'm saying is I said, or she said.

[00:08:53] I really hope I'm not confusing you because now we've gotten pretty far from the actual episode. But it's something important that, you know, it just came to my mind just now. It's something that we do and say all the time, you know. So I think I'm going to make another episode kind of just explaining that in more detail, just so I can stay on topic and on track in this episode.

[00:09:14] But if you're listening to this right now, send me a message on the Discord chat or something like that. Let me know if this explanation is making any sense because I feel like I just took five minutes trying to explain it. And I don't even know if it made sense. So let's get back on track.

[00:09:29] So we just talked about "and went". The next phrase that I wanted to explain was "cope with", C O P E W I T H. To cope with something just means to overcome something. I mean, emotionally or, you know, psychologically to overcome something. So you might be coping with the loss of your grandmother, you might be coping with the fact that you failed your entrance exam or something like that. These are very emotionally difficult things to deal with, right? So to cope with them means to overcome those emotional difficulties and move forward. That's basically the idea.

[00:10:08] Now, the last phrase I wanted to explain was "as powerful as" because he said, "thoughts are only as powerful as we let them be". So in a case where you see the word as and then an adjective and then the word as again, as powerful as or as strong as, as intelligent as. You see what I'm saying? This is a way of comparing two things and what we're saying is, you know, equal to. So, for example, thoughts are as powerful as we let them be.

[00:10:37] So when I say thoughts are only as powerful as we let them be, I'm saying thoughts only have the amount of power that we give them. You see what I'm saying? Thoughts have no more power than the amount of power that we give them. So the amount of power that thoughts have is equal to the amount of power that we give them because thoughts are only as powerful as we let them be.

[00:11:01] So you can see we're comparing the power that thoughts have to the power that we give them. And we do that by saying they're only as powerful as the power that we give them, or only as powerful as we let them be, no more. Okay? No more powerful than that. Hopefully that makes sense.

[00:11:20] And I definitely plan on focusing on it and explaining these type of phrases, you know, that go in the middle of sentences and express or form more complex sentences, you know, and express more specific detailed ideas. I'm trying to find a good way to do that. All right.

[00:11:39] But anyway, anyway, this episode has fallen off the rails. It was only like eight or nine explanations, but it took like eight or nine minutes, bro. Shit is crazy. So let me play the clip one more time and then just give you something to think about and we'll get out of here. All right? Let's do it.

[00:12:01] Sometimes we get to the train station, which is your brain, and a thought or a train comes through and you jump on it and you don't care where it's going. Take it all the way. You don't get off. You got all the way to Aberystwyth, and you sit in Aberystwyth and went, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh".

[00:12:15] You can't stop the train's coming. The thoughts are going to come. You know, "Am I going to cope with my exams? How am I going to be able to... (inaudible)? They're all come, but you don't have to jump on them each time. Thoughts are really powerful, but they're only as powerful as we let them be.

[00:12:32] All right! Now, I'm sure I'm not the only one who can relate to this. I don't know if it's because I'm a relatively creative person or if it's anxiety-related or if it's something completely different all together. But there are times when it feels like I'm having a thousand thoughts a minute. Thought after thought, after thought. And to make things worse, I entertain each and every one of those thoughts that pops into my head.

[00:12:56] This random idea pops into my head, it catches my attention and then I pursue it. Before I know it, I'm out in the middle of nowhere with this useless thought that I decided to pursue. I'm so far away from where I started that I can't even remember what I was thinking about or doing before I started chasing this random thought. And then another thought pops into my head and I'm going again.

[00:13:17] Now, overthinking could be considered something like a sickness, don't you think? I mean, sickness in the sense that it never feels good mentally or physically to overthink, at least to me, it's not a pleasant experience. It's not something I wish would happen more. You know what I'm saying? It's something that only causes exhaustion, anxiety, and frustration.

[00:13:39] I think that's why many meditation practitioners speak about the act of calming your mind down and reducing the number of thoughts and ideas you entertain. When your mind is the one that's in control, it will put you in a car and take you wherever it wants to go and you're paying for the gas. You feel me? What I mean is that you're the one that's spending the mental and sometimes physical energy to entertain and focus on these thoughts. Now, a few months ago, a friend of mine told me something that I'll probably never forget.

[00:14:07] He said, "you spend the same amount of energy thinking about something as you spend actually doing something". In other words, you spend the same amount of energy imagining a disaster as you spend actually experiencing the disaster. And it's so true, man. Your body can be in perfect condition, and at the same time, your mind can be completely exhausted. Thinking requires like, real energy. And as humans, we have a finite amount of energy to work with each day.

[00:14:39] I've noticed in my own life that making a conscious effort to stop entertaining thoughts that don't serve me at the moment was one of the best decisions I've ever made. I used to overthink and analyze all kinds of things that had nothing to do with whatever I was doing in the present moment. Not even knowing that I was robbing myself of peace, focus, and precious mental energy.

[00:15:01] I've talked quite a bit about self-awareness in previous episodes, and I'd like to speak about it again because it really is the key to so many things in life. In this case, self-awareness is the key to overcoming the annoying habit of overthinking. It's the key to gaining control of your mind and realizing that the one and only person that can entertain the thoughts that pass through your mind is you.

[00:15:23] Now, as my man said in the clip, you can't stop the thoughts from coming, but you can always choose how you react to them. You can always choose whether or not to give it your attention. And life really becomes much more simple and enjoyable when you limit the amount of things that get your attention. I wouldn't consider myself a minimalist, but I would say that the minimalist approach is very effective in many aspects of our lives. Less is often more.
[00:15:54] So if you can just reach a level of self-awareness that allows you to stop and say, "that thought doesn't need my attention right now", or "that's bullshit" or even better, say nothing at all. Then I think you'll experience a different level of internal peace. Now this, of course, takes a lot of time and discipline to achieve. You have to be incredibly self-aware and have a good amount of self-knowledge as well. It's hard to recognize which thoughts are useless or bad habits or relevant or important if you haven't been paying attention to yourself and learning about yourself up until this point.

[00:16:31] So it's definitely a difficult process, but it's definitely worth it. So just remember, the thoughts are going to come, there's no stopping them. But you always have control over how you react, not just to your thoughts, but also your emotions, your urges, and your impulses.
[00:16:49] So I sincerely hope this gave you something to think about, I hope you enjoyed the episode. I hope you learned some things. But that's it for now, man. So I'm going to get out of here. This is Coffee with Kaizen number 27 in the books. And I will talk to you soon. Peace!

[END OF EPISODE]

Writing prompts

Key Vocabulary & Grammar Guide
Download the VIP
Key Vocabulary Guide

Transcript

[00:00:00] What's up, my friend? This is coffee with Kaizen number 27. And if you're listening to this episode, that means you've become a VIP member of the Life in English community. So first of all, I want to thank you for joining the community because, without you, this podcast would not be possible. So I greatly appreciate your support.

[00:00:17] But now let me tell you about today's episode. We're going to take a trip across the pond to the U.K and listen to a short audio clip about mental health. Now, as always, I'm going to play the clip, then explain what was said and leave you with something to think about. All right, so let's not waste any more time, and let's get started. I'm going to play the clip now.[00:00:41] Sometimes we get to the train station, which is your brain, and a thought or a train comes through and you jump on it and you don't care where it's going. Take it all the way. You don't get off. You got all the way to Aberystwyth, and you sit in Aberystwyth and went, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh".

[00:00:55] You can't stop the train's coming. The thoughts are going to come. You know, "Am I going to cope with my exams? How am I going to be able to... (inaudible)? They're all come, but you don't have to jump on them each time. Thoughts are really powerful, but they're only as powerful as we let them be.

[00:01:11] All right, y'all, don't feel bad or concerned if you could not understand everything this man was saying. You know, it's an accent that's very different from mine, right? He's from somewhere in the UK, I'm not sure exactly where. And he was speaking quite fast. He wasn't enunciating as much as I do, for example. So don't feel bad if it was difficult to understand, especially, you know, just hearing it for the first time and all that type of stuff.

[00:01:35] So what I'm going to do now is just explain some of the words and phrases that he used during that clip that I think maybe could be confusing or hard to understand if you're hearing them for the first time. And I'll try to play some pieces of the clip again so you can hear those words and expressions again. Then I'll play the whole clip one more time. Then I'll leave you with something to think about and we'll get out of here. So let's start with the explanations.

[00:01:59] The first thing I wanted to explain was "to get to the train station". And the point I want to talk about is "get to", to get to the train station is just another way of saying arrive at the train station. Here in the U.S, I think it's more common, maybe more natural to say "get to the train station". Right? I just got to the airport. Or what time are we going to get to the train station? What time are you going to get home? In that context what we're saying is arrive. Alright?

[00:02:27] So the next thing I wanted to explain was "comes through" because he said, "a train comes through and you just jump on it". So in this case, to come through, the best way I can explain this is "to pass internally from one side to the other". And in this case, it would be the train station. So the train enters the station on one side and it passes all the way to the other side of the train station and leaves. So it goes through or passes through or comes through that station. All right?

[00:02:56] It would be much easier, I think, to show you visually, but hopefully, just me explaining it verbally you could get the idea. All right? So the next phrase is "jump on it" because the train comes through and you just jump on it. Now "to jump on" is an expression that means to get on it. All right? And this is a completely different way of using the word 'get' because at first, I said "get to the train station", which means arrive at the train station. But in this case, to get on the train means to board the train, right? To enter the train.

[00:03:27] So, when I say "just jump on the train", it's an informal way of saying to get on the train, and it's often used when we're speaking about public transportation. Like, I wouldn't say "jump on the car". You see what I'm saying? I could jump on a motorcycle. I could jump on the train. I could jump on a plane. I could jump on the bus, jump on a boat, or something like that. And it just, it's an informal way of saying to get on this mode of transportation. Okay?

[00:03:53] Now, the next thing I wanted to explain is "take it all the way" because you just jump on the train and you take it all the way. Which just means to stay on it until the end of the trip or the end of the journey. So, if this train goes from Los Angeles to San Francisco, I can take the train all the way to San Francisco. Right? I can take it from the very beginning of its, let's say, its journey or whatever to the completion all the way to the end.

[00:04:21] It's kind of hard to explain why we say "all the way", but we're just saying the whole way, the whole trip, the whole distance, the whole journey. We're not going to stop somewhere in the middle. We're not going to get off early. We're taking it all the way to the end. I hope that makes sense.

[00:04:38] So the next thing I wanted to explain is "you don't get off". Right? Because we talked about jumping on the train and the opposite would be hop off or jump off or get off. So, get on the train and get off the train. To board and unboard. Is it unboard or deboard? But I think it's unboard. Yeah, it's unboarding. Right? To unboard the plane means to get off the plane. Anyway, I don't want to confuse you. Let's get back to these explanations.

[00:05:05] So, The next one is "you don't get off". No, that's not next. I just explain that one. The next one is "and went". So let me go back to the actual line where he said that. One second. All right, here we go. I'm going to play it so we can be on the same page and you can know exactly what I'm talking about. Here we go.

[00:05:29] You go all the way to Aberystwyth, and you sit in Aberystwyth and went, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh."

[00:05:34] I don't know if you caught it, but he said "you go all the way to Aberystwyth". I can't pronounce the name of that city. So you go all the way to this place and then you sit in this place and went, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh". So this is kind of difficult to explain because the words that we're focusing on is "and went". So you go all the way to this place, you sit in this place and then you say or and then you go. I'm trying to think of a good way to explain this, because he's saying "and went, I wanted to go to Edinburgh".

[00:06:08] So let me, let me give you a different example to try to show you what I mean. So you know how when we're telling a story and we're talking about something that someone else said, normally what we would say is he said, blah blah blah or and then she said, blah blah blah. Or you said, blah blah blah. You see what I'm saying? That's how we express what somebody else has said, or that's how we quote people when telling stories, right?

[00:06:35] So you go all the way to this place and you sit in this place and then you say, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh". That's really the idea he's trying to express. He just didn't say it that way. You go all the way to this place and then you sit in this place and then you go, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh".

[00:06:51] So there's a couple of different ways of quoting people when telling a story. The most common, I think, is and then you say or said, and then he says or said, and then she said or said. But a very informal but also very common way to do the same thing is to say, and then you go or and then you went, depending on if you're referring to the present or the past. So let me use the same examples.

[00:07:17] So you go all the way to this place and then you sit in this place and you go, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh", which is a different city. Or you go all the way to this place and you sit in this place and then you went, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh". Now, I'm not sure if this explanation is making sense, but you have three options. So you go to this place, you sit in this place and then you say, "I wanted to go to a different place". It's option number one

[00:07:43] Number two, you go all the way to this place and you sit in this place and then you go, "I wanted to go to a different place". So the option number two, when I say "then you go". It's a very informal way of saying "then you say". I don't know why we say that, but if somebody is telling a story and they're quoting somebody else, if they're referring to what somebody else said or is saying they'll use the verb 'go' instead of 'say'.

[00:08:10] Another way now that I think about it, another way to express the same thing that you will hear a lot is using the word like. For example, she went all the way to the store and was like, "I wanted to go to a different store". So when I use those words "was like", really what I'm saying is, "she said". And if you pay attention to people having conversations, telling stories to each other, you're going to notice this

[00:08:35] So I'm talking to my friend and I'll say, "Man, she was like, get out of my face" and I was like, "I'm not going anywhere". And she was like, "I'm going to call the cops". And I was like, "Go ahead and call them". See what I'm saying? So what I'm saying, I was like, or she was like, really what I'm saying is I said, or she said.

[00:08:53] I really hope I'm not confusing you because now we've gotten pretty far from the actual episode. But it's something important that, you know, it just came to my mind just now. It's something that we do and say all the time, you know. So I think I'm going to make another episode kind of just explaining that in more detail, just so I can stay on topic and on track in this episode.

[00:09:14] But if you're listening to this right now, send me a message on the Discord chat or something like that. Let me know if this explanation is making any sense because I feel like I just took five minutes trying to explain it. And I don't even know if it made sense. So let's get back on track.

[00:09:29] So we just talked about "and went". The next phrase that I wanted to explain was "cope with", C O P E W I T H. To cope with something just means to overcome something. I mean, emotionally or, you know, psychologically to overcome something. So you might be coping with the loss of your grandmother, you might be coping with the fact that you failed your entrance exam or something like that. These are very emotionally difficult things to deal with, right? So to cope with them means to overcome those emotional difficulties and move forward. That's basically the idea.

[00:10:08] Now, the last phrase I wanted to explain was "as powerful as" because he said, "thoughts are only as powerful as we let them be". So in a case where you see the word as and then an adjective and then the word as again, as powerful as or as strong as, as intelligent as. You see what I'm saying? This is a way of comparing two things and what we're saying is, you know, equal to. So, for example, thoughts are as powerful as we let them be.

[00:10:37] So when I say thoughts are only as powerful as we let them be, I'm saying thoughts only have the amount of power that we give them. You see what I'm saying? Thoughts have no more power than the amount of power that we give them. So the amount of power that thoughts have is equal to the amount of power that we give them because thoughts are only as powerful as we let them be.

[00:11:01] So you can see we're comparing the power that thoughts have to the power that we give them. And we do that by saying they're only as powerful as the power that we give them, or only as powerful as we let them be, no more. Okay? No more powerful than that. Hopefully that makes sense.

[00:11:20] And I definitely plan on focusing on it and explaining these type of phrases, you know, that go in the middle of sentences and express or form more complex sentences, you know, and express more specific detailed ideas. I'm trying to find a good way to do that. All right.

[00:11:39] But anyway, anyway, this episode has fallen off the rails. It was only like eight or nine explanations, but it took like eight or nine minutes, bro. Shit is crazy. So let me play the clip one more time and then just give you something to think about and we'll get out of here. All right? Let's do it.

[00:12:01] Sometimes we get to the train station, which is your brain, and a thought or a train comes through and you jump on it and you don't care where it's going. Take it all the way. You don't get off. You got all the way to Aberystwyth, and you sit in Aberystwyth and went, "I wanted to go to Edinburgh".

[00:12:15] You can't stop the train's coming. The thoughts are going to come. You know, "Am I going to cope with my exams? How am I going to be able to... (inaudible)? They're all come, but you don't have to jump on them each time. Thoughts are really powerful, but they're only as powerful as we let them be.

[00:12:32] All right! Now, I'm sure I'm not the only one who can relate to this. I don't know if it's because I'm a relatively creative person or if it's anxiety-related or if it's something completely different all together. But there are times when it feels like I'm having a thousand thoughts a minute. Thought after thought, after thought. And to make things worse, I entertain each and every one of those thoughts that pops into my head.

[00:12:56] This random idea pops into my head, it catches my attention and then I pursue it. Before I know it, I'm out in the middle of nowhere with this useless thought that I decided to pursue. I'm so far away from where I started that I can't even remember what I was thinking about or doing before I started chasing this random thought. And then another thought pops into my head and I'm going again.

[00:13:17] Now, overthinking could be considered something like a sickness, don't you think? I mean, sickness in the sense that it never feels good mentally or physically to overthink, at least to me, it's not a pleasant experience. It's not something I wish would happen more. You know what I'm saying? It's something that only causes exhaustion, anxiety, and frustration.

[00:13:39] I think that's why many meditation practitioners speak about the act of calming your mind down and reducing the number of thoughts and ideas you entertain. When your mind is the one that's in control, it will put you in a car and take you wherever it wants to go and you're paying for the gas. You feel me? What I mean is that you're the one that's spending the mental and sometimes physical energy to entertain and focus on these thoughts. Now, a few months ago, a friend of mine told me something that I'll probably never forget.

[00:14:07] He said, "you spend the same amount of energy thinking about something as you spend actually doing something". In other words, you spend the same amount of energy imagining a disaster as you spend actually experiencing the disaster. And it's so true, man. Your body can be in perfect condition, and at the same time, your mind can be completely exhausted. Thinking requires like, real energy. And as humans, we have a finite amount of energy to work with each day.

[00:14:39] I've noticed in my own life that making a conscious effort to stop entertaining thoughts that don't serve me at the moment was one of the best decisions I've ever made. I used to overthink and analyze all kinds of things that had nothing to do with whatever I was doing in the present moment. Not even knowing that I was robbing myself of peace, focus, and precious mental energy.

[00:15:01] I've talked quite a bit about self-awareness in previous episodes, and I'd like to speak about it again because it really is the key to so many things in life. In this case, self-awareness is the key to overcoming the annoying habit of overthinking. It's the key to gaining control of your mind and realizing that the one and only person that can entertain the thoughts that pass through your mind is you.

[00:15:23] Now, as my man said in the clip, you can't stop the thoughts from coming, but you can always choose how you react to them. You can always choose whether or not to give it your attention. And life really becomes much more simple and enjoyable when you limit the amount of things that get your attention. I wouldn't consider myself a minimalist, but I would say that the minimalist approach is very effective in many aspects of our lives. Less is often more.
[00:15:54] So if you can just reach a level of self-awareness that allows you to stop and say, "that thought doesn't need my attention right now", or "that's bullshit" or even better, say nothing at all. Then I think you'll experience a different level of internal peace. Now this, of course, takes a lot of time and discipline to achieve. You have to be incredibly self-aware and have a good amount of self-knowledge as well. It's hard to recognize which thoughts are useless or bad habits or relevant or important if you haven't been paying attention to yourself and learning about yourself up until this point.

[00:16:31] So it's definitely a difficult process, but it's definitely worth it. So just remember, the thoughts are going to come, there's no stopping them. But you always have control over how you react, not just to your thoughts, but also your emotions, your urges, and your impulses.
[00:16:49] So I sincerely hope this gave you something to think about, I hope you enjoyed the episode. I hope you learned some things. But that's it for now, man. So I'm going to get out of here. This is Coffee with Kaizen number 27 in the books. And I will talk to you soon. Peace!

[END OF EPISODE]

Scroll to top